Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "suicides" ...

  • ADG: Violent Reality

    Since 1999, more than 8,000 Arkansans have died by gunfire — about half of them suicides. Although many law enforcement officials and legislators say that gun-control laws might work, they are unwilling to act. The stories explore the effect of specific laws on gun violence in other states, suicide-prevention advocates' work with gun sellers to keep weapons out of suicidal individuals' possession, and federal law enforcement's efforts to keep guns out of the hands of felons.
  • Presumed Innocent, Found Dead - Tracking Jail Deaths Since Sandra Bland

    A team of HuffPost reporters and data journalists created a first-of-its-kind database of more than 800 jail deaths in the U.S., identified problem jails and produced months of follow-ups, including a feature-length investigation that revealed that many jail suicides are preventable and occur in the first 72 hours after booking.
  • Sandra Bland jail suicide

    When Sandra Bland died in a jail cell in a rural Texas county, the Houston Chronicle was the first to report the suicide – an issue that had already been on the radar of Chronicle crime reporter St. John Barned-Smith. He’d already been writing about lesser-known suicides of inmates, who can be jailed in Texas on the whim of a traffic cop and kept there by Justices of the Peace without any law degree. Chronicle journalists were the first to report on Bland’s previous suicide attempt, they quickly requested and posted key documents and video, produced a more detailed profile of Bland and put the issue in context with the larger problem of jail suicides all across Texas.
  • Military suicides

    Canada’s Afghanistan mission officially ended in 2014, but the consequences of Canada’s longest war are still reverberating through military communities across the nation. The number of Canadian soldiers and veterans who have taken their lives after their Afghanistan deployment had been a tightly guarded military secret until exposed by The Globe and Mail. The newspaper’s series, The Unremembered, takes readers beyond the suicide toll, revealing serious flaws in the military’s mental health-care system and the devastating effects on soldiers. http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/the-unremembered-a-compilation-of-our-coverage-on-canadian-soldier-suicides/article27546298/
  • Could Financial Planning Help Stem the Rate of Military Suicides?

    Most Americans believe the hundreds of soldiers (and many more veterans) who kill themselves every year do so over lingering combat trauma. They’re likely wrong. Financial Planning senior editor Ann Marsh's investigation into military suicide turned a spotlight on an overlooked but leading factor in the epidemic: financial distress.
  • Hyderabad Debates Health Insurance Model as Public Hospitals Decay

    Andhra Pradesh province in southeast India is ground zero for a series of ambitious public health programs aimed to make affordable healthcare available to the rural poor. However, when these families travel to the city to find medical treatment, they must navigate a treacherous path through counterfeit pills, medical fraud, and hidden costs. An epidemic of farmer suicides bears witness to the heavy toll that unpayable medical bills incurred at private hospitals can take on families living hand to mouth in the Indian countryside. This tragedy has added desperation to the search for solutions. One such solution is the Aarogyasri Health Insurance Program, which uses India's ration card system to provide poor families access to healthcare. But is this program enough? The gleaming new medical equipment of private hospitals in Hyderabad may be open to poor families from the countryside thanks to programs like Aarogyasri, yet below this photogenic surface is a culture of medical fraud and ration card forgery. The changes in India's healthcare system must be more than skin-deep if farmers are to spend their earnings on food for their families rather than medical bills.
  • "School of Hate"

    In her article "School of Hate," Contributing Editor Sabrina Rubin Erdely exposes a history of institutional intolerance in the heartland that helped lead to a rash of LGBT teen suicides. The article delves into a harrowing crisis within Minnesota's largest school district, Anoka-Hennepin. Located in Michele Bachmann's congressional district, evangelicals prevailed upon the school board to squelch any mention of homosexuality in the classroom, instituting a policy which became dubbed as "No Homo Promo." The policy helped foster an extreme climate of fear and hate, which led to LGBT students being relentlessly bullied and isolated -- and in the span of two years, nine district students would take their own lives in a frightening "suicide cluster." Erdely's deeply reported look at the lives of these teens, the policies that contributed to their deaths and the efforts of some community members to fight back against the forces of ignorance and hate creates an article of stunning impact which not only haunts the reader well after finishing, but also helped bring about swift change.
  • Uncounted Casualties

    A three-day series that analyzed causes of death for 266 Texas veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan. The six-month investigation uncovered previously unknown information, pulling data from a variety of federal, state and local sources. The series, which also depended on extensive interviews with family members and fellow service members, revealed the startling number of Texas veterans dying of prescription drug overdoses, suicides and motor vehicle crashes. The newspaper's analysis was hailed by epidemiologists and former Department of Veterans Affairs researchers as an important step in understanding veteran mortality, and led to calls for better government tracking of how veterans are dying.
  • Firefighter Deaths

    Four suicides amongst Phoenix Fire Department members prompted this investigation. The stories detailed the link between first responders and suicide deaths.
  • "Coming Home: The Army's Fatal Neglect"

    Reporters expose a string of suicides and murders among soldiers returning to Fort Carson from Iraq. They explain problems with the "Army's healthcare system" and allege that the deaths are preventable with the right treatment and care.