Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "supervisors" ...

  • State Police Troopers, Supervisors Charged in Overtime Scandal

    Dozens of respected members of the Massachusetts State Police are suspended, so far ten have been criminally charged, and the investigations by federal and state prosecutors are continuing with more arrests expected in 2019. All of this is the result of a massive overtime scheme that was uncovered by 5 Investigates, the investigative team at WCVB in Boston. This is a precedent setting scandal that has unfolded in Massachusetts since our initial investigation. The work of 5 Investigates began in 2017 with dozens of public records requests and our first story in October that revealed supervisors and troopers who appeared to be earning thousands of dollars in overtime they never worked. By early 2018, we began to see significant developments -- suspensions, arrests for theft of taxpayer money, and a response from the Governor that resulted in some of the largest reforms within the State Police that Massachusetts has ever seen.
  • SB Tribune/ProPublica: Criminal Justice in Elkhart, Indiana

    Reports by the South Bend Tribune and ProPublica revealed deep flaws and abuses of power in the criminal justice system in Elkhart, Indiana -- from new revelations in the wrongful convictions of two innocent men, to the promotions of police supervisors with serious disciplinary records, to the mishandling of police misconduct cases -- and led to the resignation of the police chief, an independent investigation of the department and criminal charges against two officers.
  • Boston Globe: Massachusetts State Police Turmoil

    In a series of stories throughout 2018, the Globe uncovered instances of corruption within the state’s largest law enforcement agency, revealing numerous institutional failures and costly missteps. The reporters uncovered several cases of misconduct, such as a trooper’s history of racist online posts, a trooper's failures to halt a drunk driver and stop a fatal crash, and supervisors who never questioned a trooper’s drug dealing past. In the wake of these stories, the department opened internal inquiries.
  • Prison Broke

    The Pitch's investigation revealed millions of dollars were quietly paid to Missouri prison guards who were harassed and retaliated against by supervisors and coworkers. The director resigned amid state probes.
  • The Shame of Sonoma County: Supervisors Refuse to Restore Library Funding

    For a period of three months in 2015, I investigated and authored a three part investigative series of articles about the cutback of Monday library hours in Sonoma County. The stories, published on the Sonoma Independent.org and read by thousands of concerned citizens, shed entirely new light on the budget priorities of the County during the four years since the County’s woefully underfunded library system closed its doors on Mondays for the first time in a century.
  • Shots on the Bridge: Police Violence and Cover-Up in the Wake of Katrina

    Six days after Hurricane Katrina’s landfall in New Orleans, New Orleans Police Department officers opened fire on residents crossing the Danziger Bridge. When the shooting stopped, a mentally challenged man and a seventeen-year-old boy were dead, riddled with gunshot wounds. A mother’s arm was shot off, her daughter’s stomach gouged with a bullet hole, and her husband’s head pierced by shrapnel. Her nephew was shot in the neck, jaw, stomach, and hand. All six of the victims, along with two others arrested at the scene, were black and unarmed. Before the blood dried, the shooters and their supervisors had hatched a cover-up. They would plant a gun, invent witnesses, and charge two of their victims with attempted murder. The NOPD hailed all the shooters on the bridge as heroes. Shots on the Bridge explores one of the most dramatic cases of injustice in the last decade. It reveals the fear that gripped the police of a city fallen into anarchy, the circumstances that led desperate survivors to go to the bridge, and the horror that erupted with the gunfire. It dissects the cover-up that nearly buried the truth and the legal maze that, a decade later, leaves the victims still searching for justice.
  • Children Abused: Deaths Ignored

    This is an ongoing investigation of egregious errors by Denver Human Services and other Colorado human services agencies that have contributed to multiple child deaths and injuries. The investigation has, so far, resulted in new state laws to protect children, the removal of the director of DHS, a statewide audit revealing lack of proper background checks for placement homes, the criminal prosecution of a caseworker for falsifying records, a state-mandated third party review of DHS and its supervision of caseworkers, appointment of a city wide task force to identify child abuse in schools, four separate investigations by the state child protection ombudsman, and the allocation of more than $3-million for new DHS caseworkers and supervisors.
  • New York Times: Rikers Island

    An investigation revealed routine, brutal attacks by guards on inmates, many of them mentally ill, at Rikers Island in New York City, the nation’s second-largest jail, and profound dysfunction at the city agency that oversees the jail. It exposed a flagrant cover-up of wrongdoing by ranking supervisors who, instead of being disciplined, were promoted. Though Rikers officials fought the investigation at every turn, with great patience Times reporters developed a web of confidential informants who told them the true state of affairs.
  • Who benefits from Supervisor grants?

    San Diego County supervisors have long had what many call a “slush fund,” millions of dollars they can spend in any way they wish. inewsource investigative assistant Leonardo Castaneda analyzed 16 years of records to find that while the funds are meant to help improve neighborhoods, generally through grants to nonprofits, half of the money has gone back to the county itself. Each supervisor had $1 million a year in these discretionary funds, but when Castaneda began his inquiry, the board was considering doubling that amount. In this rolling investigation, His project exposed the the loose rules for grantmaking and the fact that some supervisors take personal credit and acknowledgement for the funding — when that’s not allowed. Those practices fuel the critics who say the “slush fund” is less about improving neighborhoods and more about securing the supervisors’ re-election bids.
  • How to Call 911 at the USPS

    Call 911 in the event of a medical emergency. It’s what we have been taught and it’s what we teach our kids. But producer Liz Wagner, reporter Vicky Nguyen and photographer Felipe Escamilla uncovered that at the United States Postal Service, the rules governing what to do in an emergency are very different. And those rules may have caused critical delays in life and death situations. Through interviews with sources, internal postal service documents and public records, the NBC Bay Area Investigative Unit exposed that USPS policy instructs employees to call their supervisors and then security in the event of a medical emergency—not 911.