Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "surgery" ...

  • The Trans Train

    The number of teenage girls who are seeking transgender care, has increased with thousands of percentages over the last couple of years. Many of them suffer from other diagnoses, such as Asbergers, ADHD, and self harm behavior. We could reveal that despite this being a new group in the trans gender health care clinics, they get the same treatments as previous patients in the trans gender care sector. Their bodies are transformed with hormones and transgender corrective surgery; sometimes it’s only a matter of weeks from the first visit at the clinic until the treatment commences.
  • Kaiser Health News and USA TODAY Network: Surgery Center deaths

    Millions of Americans are having routine surgeries performed at the nation’s 5,600-plus surgery centers, the small facilities that promise to get you in and out quickly, and at a much lower cost. But some of those facilities lack the staff or training to handle emergencies, and have been taking on increasingly fragile patients. It’s a dangerous situation that has put patients’ lives at risk and even children’s lives at risk, a groundbreaking investigation by Kaiser Health News and USA Today Network discovered. Hundreds of patients, some as young as two, have died after having surgeries as simple as tonsillectomies or colonoscopies. And at least 7,000 patients a year had to be raced by ambulance to a local hospital when something went wrong.
  • Heartbroken

    Heart surgery patients at the prestigious Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital in St. Petersburg died at a stunning rate, despite warnings that the procedures were putting kids at risk.
  • Analyzing police use-of-force data

    After a yearlong open records battle, the San Antonio Express-News obtained and analyzed a use-of-force database from the San Antonio Police Department. The records showed that officers used force against black and Hispanic suspects at a rate that was up to 78 percent higher than white suspects, yet less than one percent of 5,300 force incidents resulted in any kind of policy violation. The newspaper brought those stunning numbers to life with police suspension records, video, DocumentCloud and interviews with victims -- including an innocent man who was paralyzed after he underwent surgery to treat injuries from a police beating.
  • Fatal Experiments

    Paolo Macchiarini has long been hailed as both a superstar surgeon and a revolutionizing researcher in the world of regenerative medicine. When he performed the world's first transplantation of a synthetic trachea seeded with stem cells in 2011, it seemed that modern medicine was one step closer to "the artificial man," where human organs could be produced in laboratories. But when the patients soon started dying, serious allegations of research fraud started to emerge against Macchiarini and his methods. At the same time, his operations were investigated by the police for suspected manslaughter. But Macchiarini was backed by the prestigious Karolinska Institute (home of the Nobel prize), which found that all in all he had done nothing wrong. Paolo seemed to be free of the accusations, that is until he let a team of investigative reporters into his world of the academic elite.
  • Question of risk: Medtronic's lost study

    America depends on the timely notification of injuries to protect patients from dangerous medical devices. But as a Star Tribune investigation showed, companies can break injury-reporting laws with impunity. First, the newspaper exposed a long-lost Medtronic study of a controversial bone-surgery product called Infuse. The study documented more than 1,000 serious problems that were not provided to the government during a period of heightened scrutiny of the product’s safety. When Medtronic did report the data to the FDA, more than five years late, the FDA secretly granted Medtronic permission to summarize the data in a file that would be available to the public only under a FOIA request. The Star Tribune went on to document hundreds of these “retrospective summary reports” of long-overdue unreported device reports from two dozen companies.
  • Bad Medicine Behind Bars

    The death of inmate Mario Martinez in Alameda County’s jail led 2 Investigates to uncover a web of medical negligence, gaps in oversight, and cozy connections to public officials accepting money. We analyzed hundreds of pages of medical records, coroner’s reports, and court documents, which showed that despite multiple court orders the jail’s medical provider, Corizon Healthcare, repeatedly denied surgery to Martinez before his death.
  • Secret Deaths: CNN uncovers high surgical mortality rate at a Florida hospital

    Cohen’s groundbreaking investigation on Anderson Cooper 360 told the story of how the state of Florida allowed a troubled pediatric heart surgery program in West Palm Beach to continue to operate despite a high mortality rate and against the advice of its own experts. After Cohen’s story, St. Mary’s Medical Center shuttered the program and the CEO resigned.
  • Clash in the name of care

    With “Clash in the name of care,” the Globe’s Spotlight Team exposed an open secret at American hospitals: doctors sometimes start a second operation before the first is finished, meaning that patients are, in effect, sharing their surgeon. And the Globe found one remarkably consistent pattern in its investigation: patients seldom know, depriving them of a chance to say “no” beforehand. http://apps.bostonglobe.com/spotlight/clash-in-the-name-of-care/story/?p1=Clash_Landing_to-story
  • All of a sudden there was fire

    This article reports that adoption of precautionary measures to prevent patients from being set on fire in operating rooms across the country has been slow, often implemented only after hospitals experience an accident. Advocates say it’s not clear how many hospitals have instituted the available protocols, and no national safety authority tracks the frequency of surgical fires, which are thought to injure patients in one of every three incidents. About 240 surgical fires occur every year, according to rough estimates. But fires may be underreported because of fear of litigation or bad publicity.