Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "suspended" ...

  • State Police Troopers, Supervisors Charged in Overtime Scandal

    Dozens of respected members of the Massachusetts State Police are suspended, so far ten have been criminally charged, and the investigations by federal and state prosecutors are continuing with more arrests expected in 2019. All of this is the result of a massive overtime scheme that was uncovered by 5 Investigates, the investigative team at WCVB in Boston. This is a precedent setting scandal that has unfolded in Massachusetts since our initial investigation. The work of 5 Investigates began in 2017 with dozens of public records requests and our first story in October that revealed supervisors and troopers who appeared to be earning thousands of dollars in overtime they never worked. By early 2018, we began to see significant developments -- suspensions, arrests for theft of taxpayer money, and a response from the Governor that resulted in some of the largest reforms within the State Police that Massachusetts has ever seen.
  • KLAS: Driving Ms. Rezsetar

    These stories highlight problems at the top of the Health District, including a Chief that lives out of state, and a top enforcement officer with a suspended driver's license and a bench warrant. After the stories the enforcement chief was fired and an investigation was opened into the head of the health agency.
  • L.A. Times: In the Search for Drugs, a Lopsided Dragnet

    Since 2012, deputies in a specialized narcotics unit of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department have pulled over thousands of cars on a rural stretch of the 5 Freeway, California’s major north-south artery. A Times analysis of the unit’s traffic stops found Latino drivers are stopped and searched far more frequently than other motorists – a disparity that translated into thousands of innocent people being detained by deputies acting on little more than a hunch. In several cases, federal judges ruled deputies violated people’s constitutional rights. In response to The Times’ investigation, the Sheriff’s Department recently suspended the unit’s operations.
  • Campus Undercovered

    In an investigative mini-series, the NBC News Investigative Unit undertook a deep look at an array of new and under-covered issues on college campuses. It included a first-of-its-kind investigation for a national broadcast network questioning whether on-campus sexual assault tribunals are violating due process rights, including those of alleged perpetrators. It featured a multi-month, nation-wide investigation of college mental health policies, uncovering a trend of students claiming that they have been suspended or expelled for seeking help with mental health issues. It also brought viewers a rare, frank look inside the world of prescription “smart drug” abuse. In each case, these stories triggered pointed responses from the schools involved, sometimes resulting in tangible changes in the lives of the students featured, with potentially significant implications for other students in similar situations.
  • Fugitive Fathers

    The Catholic Church has allowed priests accused of sexually abusing children in the United States and Europe to relocate to poor parishes in South America, a year-long GlobalPost investigation has found. GlobalPost Senior Correspondent Will Carless and videographer Jimmy Chalk confronted five accused priests. One who relocated to a poor parish in Peru admitted on camera to molesting a 13-year-old boy while working in the Jackson, Mississippi diocese. Another is currently under investigation in Brazil after allegations arose that he abused disadvantaged children living in an orphanage he founded there. All five were able to continue working as priests, despite criminal investigations or cash payouts to alleged victims. All enjoyed the privilege, respect and unfettered access to young people that comes with being clergy members. http://www.globalpost.com/article/6677019/2015/10/28/priest-almost-got-away http://www.globalpost.com/article/6655538/2015/09/23/could-vatican-face-racketeering-charges-harboring-abusive-clergy http://www.globalpost.com/article/6649057/2015/09/14/fugitive-fathers http://www.globalpost.com/article/6669574/2015/10/15/fugitive-fathers-two-priests-have-been-suspended-globalposts http://www.globalpost.com/article/6653949/2015/09/21/survivor-advocates-critique-pope-francis-lack-real-progress-priest-sex http://www.globalpost.com/article/6649016/2015/09/14/us-priests-accused-child-sex-abuse-find-refuge-south-american-churches http://www.globalpost.com/article/6663599/2015/10/06/explainer-how-abusive-priests-are-able-relocate-abroad http://www.globalpost.com/article/6650841/2015/09/16/us-priests-accused-sex-abusive-get-second-chance-relocating-south-america
  • Driving with suspended license top crime in Menlo Park, many lose cars

    Over 4.4 million Californians have suspended driver’s licenses simply because they can’t afford to pay a traffic ticket. We chronicled the impact on everyday people and showed how minorities are affected disproportionately, focusing on the Silicon Valley city of Menlo Park, with populations representing the very affluent and the very poor.
  • Driving with suspended license top crime in Menlo Park, many lose cars

    The story shows that the majority of drivers cited for driving with a suspended license in Menlo Park, California are Latino or African American. Most of these citations resulted in the driver's vehicle being impounded for the statutory 30 day period. Many of the drivers affected had their licenses suspended not because of safety concerns such as DUIs, but because of other reasons, such as not paying for two minor traffic tickets and failing to show up in court. More than half of the drivers, according to towers, never retrieve their cars from impound lots, which is very likely due to the steep cost of retrieving the vehicles, which sometimes is worth more than the car. The story explores whether the punishment of losing a car fits the original violation.
  • Deadly Impact

    This in-depth, nine month investigation by Chief Correspondent Brian Ross and Producer Cindy Galli was the first to disclose previously-secret company emails and documents, all pointing to an internal cover-up by guardrail manufacturer Trinity Industries. The company had modified a popular highway product without disclosing the changes to the government, as is required by law. That design change has now been blamed for injuries and deaths around the country. It also called into question the lack of oversight by the Federal Highway Administration. The first reports had an immediate impact as over a dozen states suspended purchases of the questionable guardrail end terminals in the days following the report. When we first reported our story, the Federal Highway Safety Administration said it considered the guardrail end terminals to be safe. Since our broadcast, more than 40 states have suspended the use of the devices and under growing pressure from congressional and state officials, the Federal Highway Administration has now ordered the company to conduct new safety tests which are currently ongoing .
  • Tapping into Controversial Back Surgeries

    Spinal fusion is one of the most common surgeries in America, but there are concerns that some doctors are performing it unnecessarily. The procedure joins two or more adjacent vertebrae, often with metal rods and screws, and can result in paralysis or life-threatening complications. For this six month investigation, we built a database from previously unreleased government records. It showed for the first time how many spinal fusions each surgeon in the country performed on Medicare patients, under the billing codes used most commonly for "degenerative" conditions that cause back pain. Half a dozen experts on medical billing and spine surgery told us that focusing on these codes would be the most effective way to identify abuse. We exposed that a small group of doctors performed far more of these lucrative but potentially dangerous procedures than their peers. Some of them were also banned or suspended from hospitals or settled lawsuits alleging unnecessary surgeries. Our findings were so alarming to the president of a top neurosurgery society that he called on authorities to look into these doctors. We also put the database online, made it easily searchable by patients, and provided guidance from experts on how to interpret it.
  • State's Child Care Oversight: Minimal Monitoring, Lax Enforcement

    Statistics show that nearly two-thirds of Connecticut children live in households where all parents (or providers) work. And reliance on child day care services for those families tops 80 percent. Yet, how good is Connecticut in ensuring the state’s 1,505 licensed day care centers are safe and meeting state standards? Lisa Chedekel spent three months reviewing state inspection reports for many of the state’s licensed day care centers to answer that question.