Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "television" ...

  • Families complain of mold, lead paint, rats in military housing ahead of hearing

    In February, CBS News gained access to privatized housing at Ft. Meade, becoming the first national television network to go on to a military base to investigate issues within the U.S. military’s privatized housing program. Through our coverage, CBS News exposed problems with mold, insects and structural integrity covered up or ignored by private housing companies. This story led to a swift response from then-Secretary of the Army Mark Esper, who granted an exclusive on-camera interview with CBS News to outline how his department planned to respond.
  • Silent No More

    The Hearst Television National Investigative Unit’s year-long investigation, ‘Silent No More,’ uncovered new allegations of child sexual abuse and decades-long cover-ups inside a religious organization in the United States. We also learned investigators from Attorneys General offices in at least three states have been looking into the Jehovah’s Witnesses church – and that the number has likely grown since our four-part series aired in August and September of 2019. Perhaps most importantly, the survivors who agreed to speak on-camera for this series told us they now have a new sense of empowerment; one launched a non-profit, a few testified before state legislatures, several obtained attorneys, and all told us of the confidence they gained after being silent for so long.
  • The Trans Train

    The number of teenage girls who are seeking transgender care, has increased with thousands of percentages over the last couple of years. Many of them suffer from other diagnoses, such as Asbergers, ADHD, and self harm behavior. We could reveal that despite this being a new group in the trans gender health care clinics, they get the same treatments as previous patients in the trans gender care sector. Their bodies are transformed with hormones and transgender corrective surgery; sometimes it’s only a matter of weeks from the first visit at the clinic until the treatment commences.
  • Silenced: 1.5 Million Florida Felons Without a Vote

    “Silenced: 1.5 Million Florida Felons Without a Vote” is a television news special that raised awareness about the large amount of the state’s population that is ineligible to vote due to a prior felony conviction. The news special outlined the subjectivity in current way in which Florida restores felon’s voting rights, highlighted a proposed state amendment that would automatically restore voting rights to most Florida felons, and featured prospective voters discussing the issue after watching the special as a group.
  • APTN: Reckoning at Ste. Anne's

    Dear Judges, An investigation by the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network helped expose the ongoing injustices faced by survivors of the notorious St. Anne’s Residential School in Fort Albany, Ontario. Many of the former students of St. Anne’s have been involved in a years-long court battle with the federal government over the suppression of volumes of documents detailing decade’s worth of abuse that occurred at the school.
  • Racism in the Ranks

    The 2018 acquittal of Gerald Stanley in the death of Colten Boushie reverberated across the country. Indigenous people rallied against what they saw as an injustice. “We knew we really went back 10 years, maybe fifteen years on all the work we’ve been trying to do in this province in this country on reconciliation.” – Darlene Okemaysim-Sicotte, Advocate for Indigenous women Stanley shot and killed Boushie after the 22-year-old Cree man and friends had driven on Stanley’s farm in rural Saskatchewan. In the midst of the debate over whether the not guilty verdict was a symptom of systemic racism or support of the right to defend property, APTN Investigates video journalist Trina Roache discovered racist posts by an RCMP (ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE) officer on social media.
  • Oregonian: Pac-12 Left Out

    A four-part series that provides an in-depth look at the many issues facing the Pac-12 Conference, including extraordinarily high operating costs, a struggling TV network and a commissioner who spends lavishly.
  • LAST RESORT

    It was a difficult journey through the past for two men who were sent to a behaviour modification camp as young offenders in the 1970s. In fall 2018, Richard Yarema and Guy Dumas returned with APTN Investigates’ reporter Christopher Read to the fly-in facility operated by the Ranch Erhlo Society in northern Saskatchewan. The story chronicles the brief and violent history of “wilderness challenge” camps where the majority of campers were Indigenous.
  • Justice for Colten

    Colten Boushie, a 22-year old Cree youth was shot in the head by Saskatchewan farmer Gerald Stanley. That is undisputed. So, why the not-guilty verdict? That decision sparked protests across the country and brought race relations in Canada into sharp focus with some Indigenous people seeing a justice system steeped in colonialism and white supremacy.
  • Insight with John Ferrugia: Marijuana Murder?

    When Richard Kirk murdered his wife in 2014, the case was stunning. Recreational marijuana had been newly legalized in Colorado. Marijuana edibles were for sale and accessible. He bought one to try. And then he killed his wife, Kris. In this 35-minute podcast investigation, “Marijuana Murder?” radio producer Leigh Paterson and television reporter/producer Lori Jane Gliha worked together to obtain a long sought-after, exclusive interview with the killer and to explore new scientific research linking marijuana edibles to hallucinations and other psychiatric effects.