Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "terrorists" ...

  • Secrets of the Kingdom

    A searchlight on Saudi Arabia exposes covert support for Islamic terrorists, nagging tensions over religious strictness and the hajj pilgrimage calamity.
  • Isis Inc

    The FT’s 'Isis Inc' series is the most difficult, important and revelatory investigation the Financial Times has done in years. It exposed for the first time how the jihadis raise - and spend - their money and run their affairs. It also underlined the failure of the western air campaign to dent its organization and revenues. The power of the reporting was reinforced by a host of telling graphics and interactives. “How oil fuels terrorists” was our most read story of the year.
  • Haaretz Investigation: Israeli Corporations Gave Millions to West Bank Settlements

    In this investigative project, Blau looks into how tax-exempt dollars raised in the U.S. end up sustaining illegal Jewish settlements in the West Bank—in direct contravention of longstanding U.S. policy. He systematically analyzed the financial files and tax filings of dozens of American non-profits and their partners in Israel. In an on-going series of stories published by Haaretz, Blau reported that these U.S.-based groups funneled more than $220 million to Jewish settlements during the five-year period between 2009-2013. He found that the money is being spent on everything from new air conditioning units in settlement housing to support payments for the families of convicted Jewish terrorists. By painstakingly tracing, documenting and reporting on the fund-raising and spending of these groups, Blau’s project sheds new light on America's complicated relationship with one of its closest allies. It has stirred heated debate and thoughtful discussion in this country and Israel, including a prominent mention in The New York Times editorial pages and an op-ed (written by Blau) in The Washington Post. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BVmWgzpAXX0 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0XGsd1LreCY https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JyQ9xBbDbrw https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ACKIAMMK0OY
  • State of Terror

    In an unmatched examination of the Islamic State that began well before the attacks in Paris, The Times showed the secrets behind the group’s baffling resilience, tracking ISIS on battlefields in Syria, Libya and Iraq, and exposing its recruiting techniques, money trails and systematic policy of rape.
  • The $500,000 Green Card: The EB-5 Visa Program

    A year-long ABC News investigation focused on one of the most obscure paths to a U.S. visa and green card -- one being aggressively marketed to wealthy foreigners, and one that whistleblowers say is being exploited by criminals, spies, and possibly even terrorists. It is the story of the $500,000 Green Card -- a path to legal residency that begins with an offer by a wealthy foreign national to invest half-a-million dollars in an approved project that promises to create American jobs. http://video-cdn.abcnews.com/160106_ire_visas.mp4 http://abcnews.go.com/Nightline/fullpage/500000-green-card-eb-visa-program-28662457
  • The Narco-Terror Trap

    This project traces the Drug Enforcement Administration’s use of a little-known statute of the Patriot Act to create a role for itself in the war on terror, based largely on unsubstantiated assertions that terrorists were using the drug trade to finance attacks against the United States. The statute, adopted with broad bi-partisan support, allows the D.E.A. to pursue so-called narco-terrorists anywhere in the world, even when none of their alleged crimes occurred on American soil. Between 2002 and 2008, the agency’s budget for foreign operations increased by some 75 percent, which supported expansions into Afghanistan, Eastern Europe, and West Africa. But an examination of the D.E.A.’s narco-terrorism cases reveals that most unraveled as they proceeded through court. The cases relied heavily on sting operations, and the only evidence of any links between terrorists and traffickers was concocted by the D.E.A., which used highly-paid informants to lure targets into staged narco-terrorism conspiracies. The first piece tells the story of three small-time smugglers from Mali who were arrested in West Africa, transported to New York and accused as narco-terrorists with links to Al-Qaeda. It explains how the D.E.A.’s narco-terrorism campaign began in the arrest-first-ask-questions-later period that followed 9/11. And it details the negligible contributions that the effort, whose total cost remains unknown, has made to keeping the country safe from either terrorists or drug traffickers. Nearly three years after the Malian’s arrest, a judge found that the men were not linked to Al-Qaeda, and that they had been motivated to participate in the D.E.A.’s fake conspiracy by an informant’s offer to pay them millions of dollars. The second piece uses an interactive comic – ProPublica’s first – to bring a sharper focus to the patterns in the DEA’s cases. It uses five different narco-terrorism operations in five different parts of the world. The interactivity of the comic allows readers to see how the agency’s stings use essentially the same script in order to make disparate targets fit the designated crime. https://projects.propublica.org/graphics/narco
  • European Jihadists

    As the world's attention turned to ISIS advancing from their staging ground in Syria through to Iraq, CNN International correspondent Atika Shubert and her team focused on the phenomenon of European jihadists joining their ranks. They are primarily young Muslims, who are drawn to fight in Syria -- often leaving solid middle-class homes and relatively comfortable lives to participate in “jihad” – holy war, alongside members of ISIS, al Qaeda and other groups. It is a phenomenon that keeps western intelligence agents up at night, and as this description is being written, Atika is in Paris reporting for CNN while French authorities are on a massive man-hunt for terrorists who may have done just that – gone to fight in Syria and come back to bring their extreme beliefs and its attendant violence back home. Through their reporting, Atika and her team have tried to understand the phenomenon – even interviewing British jihadists in Idlib, Syria via Skype to find out why they are there.
  • Substation INSECURITY

    This groundbreaking investigation exposed serious and what experts called critical failures in the security at key electric substations in Northern and Central California. Many high level, informed sources have said substations in California and throughout the United States offer terrorists the opportunity to significantly impact the future of our country and our economy. The NBC Bay Area Investigative Unit working on tips from high ranking government and former government sources spent five months gathering data, identifying critical substations, locating key experts and testing the level of security at electric substations.
  • ABC News Brian Ross Investigates: Olympic Gold, Olympic Greed

    With terror threats already dampening the spirit of the games, an ABC News Brian Ross Investigation into dramatic charges of corruption exposed the organized crime figures behind Russia’s winning bid to host the 2014 Winter Olympic Games. It also exposed the internal corruption behind the multi-billion dollar construction of the Olympic venue in Sochi, a seaside resort better known for palm trees and beaches, located near a hotbed of Islamic terrorists. It is a story of bribes, suitcases filled with cash and a whistleblower who claims there’s a contract on his life because he dared to speak out.
  • Double Agent: Inside al Qaeda for the CIA

    The world’s most dangerous terrorists, espionage, betrayal, and assassination are all part of the intrigue of "Double Agent: Inside al Qaeda for the CIA," a remarkable documentary about Morten Storm, a radical-Islamist-turned-double-agent who says he was in a race against time to thwart attacks by al Qaeda. It is a spy thriller told through never-before-seen videos recorded by Storm on the job as a spy. His photos and al Qaeda encrypted emails, and never-before-heard audio from his years undercover reveal a rare glimpse of CIA missteps and the destructive rivalries between competing global intelligence agencies.