Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

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Search results for "texas" ...

  • Oil Empire

    As Texas' oil production has boomed and the Craddick family's oil wealth has increased, so has their political clout. When Christi Craddick assumed elected office as that industry's top regulator in 2013, it ensured the Craddick name would be one of the most powerful and widely-renowned in the state's history. KXAN discovered, since the start of 2014, Craddick voted at least 320 times on agenda items brought by companies that pay her and her family royalties or dividends, according to her personal financial disclosures. We also found she cast more than 100 votes on enforcement actions against those companies.
  • How Texas Keeps Tens of Thousands of Children Out of Special Education

    In “Denied,” the Houston Chronicle revealed that a group of Texas state officials had arbitrarily decided what percentage of students should receive special education services and had enforced the benchmark by intensely auditing school districts for “over-identification.” The effort, which began in 2004 but was never announced and remained completely unknown outside of district special education departments, saved the state billions of dollars but denied critical help to tens of thousands of children with disabilities. As a result, the Chronicle reported, Texas now provides special education services to a lower percentage of its students than any other state in the country – by far. If Texas gave services at the same rate as everybody else, more than 250,000 more children in the state would be receiving services such as tutoring, counseling and therapy.
  • Silent Majority/Mayoria Silenciosa

    A first-of-its-kind analysis found deep patterns of under-representation of the fast growing Hispanic population on city councils and county commissioners courts across Texas. http://projects.statesman.com/news/latino-representation/
  • Flood-related spills ignored by TX officials

    The El Paso Times exposed the fact that even though they had civil-air patrol photos of them, Texas officials have mostly ignored scores of spills of oil and fracking fluid during severe floods in recent years. When they reported on the photos, which were posted on an obscure government website, the Texas Department of Public Safety ended public access to them. After subsequent reporting and editorializing, officials returned them to public view. They obtained and analyzed scores of regulatory reports to rebut regulators' claims that they respond to every spill. The problematic responses to the spills, however, continue.
  • Unlivable: How Texas Fails Farmworkers

    A four-month investigation into the state of Texas’ inspection program for migrant farmworker housing revealed a broken system where regulators have never taken action against growers who house workers in substandard conditions and don't seek out illegally operating facilities.
  • Unprotected

    An NBC 5 investigation found the Texas Department of Transportation failed to put up guardrails in locations where state and federal guidelines suggest they should have been installed. In some of those spots with no guardrails drivers have died after colliding with large concrete bridge posts that sit unprotected, some just feet from the roadway.
  • Hell and High Water

    The Houston area is home to 6.5 million people, as well as America’s largest oil refining and petrochemical complex. And it’s a sitting duck for the extreme storms and floods that will become more common as the effects of climate change become more pronounced. So why isn’t Texas — or the federal government — doing more to protect it?
  • Bled Dry

    When local hospitals shut their doors, communities usually blame poor economics or heavy regulation. But The Dallas Morning News found another reason for closures: Businessmen who bought ailing hospitals and siphoned off their cash, often leaving them vacant hulks in devastated towns. What may seem at first to be an unlikely scenario has played out not just in Texas, but across the country. One owner left a trail of 13 wrecked hospitals in seven states. In Nevada, a doctor who put down $10,000 to take over the only hospital between Reno and Las Vegas pulled out at least $8 million before the cash-starved medical center shut down. Federal regulators and most states don’t vet people who take over hospitals, The News discovered, and there is little financial oversight. Even when patient care suffers at these stripped facilities, regulators seldom hold those who profited accountable.
  • Seismic Denial

    Despite growing scientific evidence, Texas won't admit that fracking wastewater is causing earthquakes. Why?
  • The Baylor Scandal

    Two years ago, Patty Crawford took the job of Title IX coordinator at Baylor University. Many believed the new full-time position was created to help the Texas Division I school after several students, including active and former members of its football team were accused, and some convicted, of sexual assault. But Crawford has resigned, saying the school was more interested in protecting its reputation than its students.