Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "thailand" ...

  • Simon & Schuster: A Deal with the Devil

    A Deal with the Devil chronicles the journey of two investigative journalists as they search for answers about one of the longest-running mail frauds in history. The scam centers around a mysterious psychic named Maria Duval, whose name and face have become infamous to sick and elderly victims all around the world, who have sent in millions of dollars in response to bogus promises made by letters allegedly signed by Duval. Global investigators have spent decades trying to stop the fraud, but when those efforts failed and they couldn’t determine who this woman was -- or if she was even real – authors Blake Ellis and Melanie Hicken made it their mission to get to the bottom of this notorious scam once and for all. Their hunt takes readers on twists and turns as they discover key orchestrators of the fraud hiding away in places like Monaco and Thailand, and as they get farther than any law enforcement has -- even traveling to France in an attempt to confront the psychic herself. Investigative reporter Bethany McLean called the book “a personal how-to guide for investigative journalists, a twisted tale of a scam of huge proportions and a really good read.” NYU Journalism Professor Adam Penenberg, who famously exposed journalist fraudster Stephen Glass, said, “Journalists Ellis and Hicken out-sleuthed professional law enforcement in unraveling the mystery of a $200 million global scam. What they have wrought would have made a gripping novel. The fact that every word is true is what makes this book downright shocking.” Other endorsements came from NBC business anchor Ali Velshi and crime fiction writer Megan Abbott.
  • Seafood From Slaves

    The Associated Press team uncovered a slave island and relentlessly exposed horrific labor abuses in Thailand's $7 billion annual seafood export industry. During their year-long investigation, Margie Mason, Robin McDowell, Martha Mendoza and Esther Htusan tied seafood caught and processed by trapped workers to the supply chains of almost every major U.S. retailer including Wal-Mart, Kroger, Sysco and Nestle. The reporters used images from space to track down runaway slave ships in Papua New Guinea and dug up loopholes in federal law allowing imports to continue unchecked. When Thailand¹s government said the abuses all occur in foreign territory, the journalists focused on factories just outside its capital, Bangkok where they found children and poor migrants locked inside and forced to peel shrimp. Tapping AP colleagues in all 50 states and eight countries, they documented how those seafood supply chains spread around the world. http://interactives.ap.org/2015/seafood-from-slaves/?START=freedom https://vimeo.com/151181618 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9IeJOnCQlj0&feature=youtu.be https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vgYgAVQG5lk&feature=youtu.be
  • Hong Kong's back-room bookies go global thanks to online betting

    The South China Morning Post built on a court case in Las Vegas to document how figures linked to Hong Kong's organised crime world have moved from hosting VIPs in Macau's casinos to running online gambling websites, an unregulated industry in Asia used for massive laundering of crime proceeds. They worked with reporters in the US, Montenegro, Singapore, Germany, Costa Rica, Italy, Malaysia, Thailand and Spain to document a key figure's global footprint. The Las Vegas court case allowed us to do documents-based investigative reporting on triad societies probably for the first time since the territory's return to China.
  • Thai Shrimp Industry Exploits Workers to Whet Global Appetite for Cheap Shrimp

    Shrimp is big business in Thailand, thanks to an appetite in the United States that continues to grow. Today, a third of country’s exported shrimp goes to the U.S., its top customer, where retail giants like Walmart and Costco do high-volume sales and suburban Red Lobsters offer bargain blue plate specials. Breakthroughs in aquaculture have helped Thai producers keep up with the rising demand, but there’s a catch to their success: an invisible underclass of Burmese migrant workers, thousands of whom labor in sub-human conditions to keep costs down. Of the estimated 200,000 Burmese migrants working in Samut Sakhon province, the heartland of the Thai shrimp industry, about a third are unregistered and subject to rights abuses. Independent monitors say that thousands desperate to escape the poverty and dictatorship of their homeland cross the border only to find themselves trapped in bonded labor that’s tantamount to slavery. Sold by brokers to crooked factory owners, they are forced to endure long hours for pitiful wages, physical abuse and intimidation. Many are children who do not meet Thai working age requirements. Their plight is made worse, critics say, by the profit-induced apathy of Thai authorities who turn a blind eye or are complicit in abuses. Reporters Steve Sapienza and Jason Motlagh investigate exploitative labor practices at the lower levels of the supply chain.
  • Rohingya: A Forgotten People

    This investigation reveals abuse committed by the Thai Military against Rohingya minorities fleeing from Burma. The Thai Military would intercept Rohingya boats with refugees aboard and tow them out to the middle of the sea and leave them without adequate supplies. Being without food and water many of the Rohingya refugees died, but the numbers are unclear as to how many people actually died.
  • Jenkins Photo Proof of Kidnapping?

    The web report address the practice in North Korea of kidnapping citizens of other Asian nations and holding them against their will in North Korea. The story focuses on the case of a Thai woman.
  • Parental Discretion: China Tries Easing Once-Brutal Approach to Family Planning

    Wall Street Journal reports on the use of family planning methods in China. Since 1980 China has 'encouraged' families to one child, "but left the implementation up to local officials-who often abused their power by carrying out directives with brute force." But after the country paid for Ms. Liu to observe family-planning tactics in Thailand in 1996- change has been occurring in China. Ms. Liu and her colleagues have changed family-planning offices where male officials simply sat behind desks to "wide-open service stations that encourage drop-in visitors". They have thrown out "dense, text-heavy pamphlets on family-planning policy" and replaced them with cartoon characters explaining subjects easier to women with little education. In addition, the article reports on the importance of more than one child to Chinese farmers. While there are still heavy fines for having more than one child, farming communities like Yicheng "have been permitted since 1985 to have two children as long as they space them five years apart." The article continues to report on China's new family-planning reforms.
  • The Shame of Medical Research

    American medical researchers increasingly are conducting AIDS research in third world countries and arguably violating international standards of experimentation such as the Helsinki Declaration. Countries in which clinical trials are now conducted are often too poor to pay for the medicines that are successfully tested, and the people recruited for those trials very seldom get the medical care participants in trials in prosperous countries can expect.
  • Bitter Harvest

    Ms. looks at the sex trade in Thailand where prostitution is a large part of the exonomy.
  • Nightmare without end

    Stephen Roye went to Thailand in pursuit of the story that he hoped would restore his journalism career. He posed as a courier carrying drugs back from Thailand. But he was caught, thrown in a squalid Bangkok prison, and sentenced to life.