Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "thieves" ...

  • Easy Targets

    There are some sixty-three thousand licensed gun dealers in the U.S.—nearly twice the number of McDonald’s and Starbucks combined. But, unlike other businesses that deal in dangerous products, such as pharmacies or explosives makers, most gun stores face no legal requirements to secure their merchandise. As a result, there has been a sharp increase in gun-store thefts. This story focuses on a group of thieves who preyed on gun stores in North Carolina, stealing more than two hundred weapons over a four-month period. The Trace and The New Yorker relied on thousands of public records and more than fifty interviews to track these guns through a network of black-market profiteers.
  • Opening the black box of Egypt's slush funds

    This exposé of massive corruption in Egypt at the hands of the country's military rulers and loyalists of the failed Mubarak regime launches a partnership between the Washington DC-based non-profit Angaza Foundation for Africa Reporting (TAFAR) and Africa Confidential, the longest-established English-language publication on Africa. Entitled "Opening the black box of Egypt's slush funds", the story details how Egyptian generals and senior government officials use a complex network of slush funds as their private piggy banks, siphoning off billions of dollars from the country to top-up salaries and maintain networks of political allegiances. It also describes how recent attempts to investigate these so-called special funds have led to cover-ups, including Egyptian police allegedly stealing records implicating them in the misuse of their own funds. This “deep dive” report exposing mishandled slush funds, financial cover-ups, and massive corruption in Egypt was edited by former veteran Reuters correspondent Bernd Debusman, and overseen by TAFAR’s President and Executive Director Bobby Block, a Wall Street Journal veteran. https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/egypt/2015-06-26/sisi-and-his-40-thieves
  • Police Secrets

    For years, police agencies throughout the United States have conducted secret surveillance that skirts — and in some cases flouts — laws meant to safeguard Americans’ privacy. They did it to monitor drug traffickers and petty thieves, then sought to conceal their actions from the public and from judges. Our investigating throughout the year revealed the depths of some of that surveillance by federal, state and local authorities.
  • Why'd You Steal My...

    Thieves are stealing bikes from garages.. and packages from front porches in Salt Lake City. And it's happening a lot. The problem is.. most of the suspects are never caught and the stolen property is rarely recovered. So we decided to 1) find out why there's such little success in arresting and recovering; and 2) catch a few of the thieves on our own to see if there's a larger ring of criminal activity. Using surveillance cameras, a GPS unit, and a lot of time.. The KSL Investigators literally chased down the thieves, shedding light on how these seemingly minor crimes lead to activity that is much, much worse. As a result.. police have started to step up their game. http://www.ksl.com/?nid=1171&sid=37154763 https://ksl.com/?sid=34605937&nid=1171
  • Supplement Shell Game

    An investigation by USA TODAY reporter Alison Young revealed that a wide array of dietary supplement companies selling products dangerously spiked with hidden pharmaceuticals are headed by executives with criminal backgrounds and run-ins with regulators. They’re convicted felons, thieves, drug addicts, narcotic sellers and more, the reporting revealed. And once they enter the lucrative, $30-billion-a-year supplement business, almost anything goes. Criminals turned supplement entrepreneurs have repeatedly put risky products on the market through a changing series of companies as overwhelmed regulators struggled to keep up. Their pills and powders have included everything from a sleep-aid laced with a powerful anti-psychotic drug, to a widely sold workout supplement spiked with a methamphetamine-like chemical never before tested on people.
  • Outlaws Blast Banks

    The Reporter investigated the action of gangs who engage in bank robberies by using explosives. They act with violence, taking hostages and spreading fear in small towns. The investigation found that the outlaws get the explosives in Paraguay, where they are sold freely, and in mining fields as well . The report also revealed exclusive videos showing how the thieves act.
  • Supplement Shell Game

    An investigation by USA TODAY reporter Alison Young revealed that a wide array of dietary supplement companies selling products dangerously spiked with hidden pharmaceuticals are headed by executives with criminal backgrounds and run-ins with regulators. They’re convicted felons, thieves, drug addicts, narcotic sellers and more, the reporting revealed. And once they enter the lucrative, $30-billion-a-year supplement business, almost anything goes. Criminals turned supplement entrepreneurs have repeatedly put risky products on the market through a changing series of companies as overwhelmed regulators struggled to keep up. Their pills and powders have included everything from a sleep-aid laced with a powerful anti-psychotic drug, to a widely sold workout supplement spiked with a methamphetamine-like chemical never before tested on people.
  • Get out of jail on a payment plan.

    New Jersey bail bond companies are making it possible for accused killers, thieves, drug dealers and individuals charged with gun-related crimes to go free on installment plan deals before trial without the knowledge of judges and prosecutors. It's a practice that has come in for criticism in states like Washington and Ohio where defendants set free on payment plan deals have been accused of murder. This is the first investigation to document how often defendants secure these deals.
  • Disabled veterans fleeced by VA-appointed fund managers

    Dozens of convicted thieves, chronic gamblers, mentally ill and the bankrupt were among those approved to handle veterans’ assets by the VA, according to nationwide interviews and an unprecedented analysis of never-before released inspector general and court records.
  • Stamping Out Fraud: Uncovering Rogue Food Stamp Retailers

    A Scripps Howard News Service investigation has found found dozens of individuals who have been banned as food stamp merchants yet nonetheless remained in business in communities across the country because of lax governmental oversight. Scripps later identified more flaws in the program's oversight: Convicted thieves and cheats are running food-stamp stores around the nation, even though federal law is supposed to prohibit them from doing so.