Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

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  • Trump & Ukraine: Fact and Fiction

    The President’s men, the Vice President’s son and a single phone call: the real story of what happened in Ukraine and why it led to impeachment hearings. As the rumors and accusations surrounding President Trump’s involvement in Ukraine started to swirl, NBC’s Chief Foreign Correspondent Richard Engel travelled to Ukraine to talk to the key players on the ground to tell the story of why the Ukrainian prosecutor investigating Joe Biden’s son was really fired. Engel and his team in Ukraine secured the first broadcast interview with the man central to the story – the Ukrainian former Prosecutor Yuri Leshenko. He revealed that President Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani was applying pressure for an investigation to be reopened, in an apparent attempt to dig for dirt on a political rival. He told NBC exclusively that far from being a one-off conversation, the two had spoken “around ten times”. This information was picked up and widely reported by other media.
  • University of Utah Student Killed; Who Is Murder Suspect Ayoola Ajayi?

    Twelve days after the disappearance of University of Utah student, Mackenzie Lueck this summer, and following an exhaustive investigation by law enforcement, police arrested and formally charged the suspect in her death, Ayoola Adisa Ajayi. Ajayi faces four charges in connection to Lueck’s violent murder, including aggravated murder and aggravated kidnapping. KSL Investigators knew Ajayi was the person of interest in this case because he owned the small property in Salt Lake where multiple search warrants were executed in the case prior to his arrest. Before authorities released his name to the public, KSL Investigators worked to learn everything they could about the 31-year-old immigrant, originally from Africa, so we could break the investigation as soon as the suspect’s name was released. Although much of a person’s immigration status is private information, representatives with the Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Office confirmed Ajayi is a lawful legal resident and he was at the time of his arrest. However, the KSL Investigators exposed how he came to this country and revealed possible oversight by Utah State University and the federal government when he dropped out of school a number of times and was posting online about seeking to find a wife to keep his citizenship status.
  • Almost Forbidden

    As vaping-related youth nicotine addiction surged across the United States, we exposed a key political decision to ignore the clear warning signs years before the crisis. Government documents obtained by the Los Angeles Times revealed that, four years ago, the Food and Drug administration attempted to ban vaping flavors that were hooking young teenagers to nicotine. But after a deluge of over 100 lobbyists visited the White House, senior political officials overruled experts at the FDA and eliminated the flavor ban, along with much of the scientific evidence calling for it. Later that year, the national youth vaping rate skyrocketed.
  • The Henry Pratt Mass Shooting

    On the afternoon of Feb. 15, disgruntled warehouse employee Gary Martin opened fire during a termination hearing at the Henry Pratt Co. in Aurora, Ill., killing five people and wounding several police officers before being fatally shot by law enforcement. Before police publicly identified Martin, the Tribune learned his name from sources and began investigating his background. One thing quickly became clear: Martin, a convicted felon who had served prison time for attempting to kill his girlfriend, never should have been allowed to purchase the gun used in the shooting. This discovery – aided by carefully worded Freedom of Information Act requests, unparalleled sourcing and a review of extensive court records – prompted the Illinois State Police to disclose hundreds of pages of documents related to Martin’s firearms license and gun purchase within days of the shooting. It was an unprecedented release of information, in terms of both expediency and subject manner. Illinois law expressly prohibits the disclosure of records related to firearm owner’s identification cards or concealed carried permits, but Tribune reporters were able to convince law-enforcement officials that Martin’s firearms history should be exempt from such protections because he fraudulently obtained his license by lying on his permit application. Upon receiving this information, reporters submitted further FOIAs in an effort to understand the depths of the state’s problem. A reporting project that started within hours of a mass shooting grew into an investigation that found 34,000 Illinois had their gun permits revoked – and that the state has no idea what happen to their guns. That meant 78 percent of people stripped of their gun licenses failed to account for their weapons. The responsive records – some of which required difficult fights and keen sourcing to obtain - exposed serious flaws in the national databases relied upon to conduct criminal background checks, as well as the state’s failure to ensure that people surrender their weapons after their Firearm Owner's Identification cards are revoked. In an analysis of data released for the first time, the Tribune found as many as 30,000 guns may still be in possession of people deemed too dangerous to own firearms. The Tribune also was able to create an online-lookup that allowed readers to look up how many people in their town had their gun permits stripped, the reason for the revocation and how many times that person had made a serious inquiry about purchasing a gun.
  • In the Dark

    “In the Dark” was a narrative investigative series, providing the anatomy of the faulty police investigation into the 1994 slayings of a young mother and her toddler son, Stacy Falcon Dewey and Jacob Dewey. The investigation allowed the truth to slip through the cracks despite DNA evidence that had linked a convicted murderer to the crime scene. The story uncovered emails and other records that showed how neglect and indifference by forensics examiners and prosecutors delayed the case, leaving the victims’ unwitting family to suffer for years without answers.
  • Burned: A Story of Murder and the Crime That Wasn't

    The book revisits the murder conviction of Jo Ann Parks, sentenced to life in prison without parole for allegedly murdering her three young children in 1989by setting fire to her home and trapping them inside. In re-investigating the case, the author found flawed forensic science, false and contradictory testimony, and strong evidence of cognitive bias throughout the case, including use of an unreliable informant who later recanted, and sworn expert testimony that the fire began because Parks supposedly constructed a crude “incendiary device” by deliberately overloading a sabotaged electrical extension cord. Testing later proved the cord did not and could not start a fire. Information in the book has since been added to Parks’ existing habeas corpus petition filed by the California Innocence Project, now being considered by the state Supreme Court. Additional findings suggests the problems with flawed forensic science and cognitive bias in general, and in arson investigation in particular, is widespread and has led to other wrongful convictions. Correcting the use of flawed forensic and expert testimony is hindered by the legal system’s reliance on precedent, which slows and sometimes prevents the correction of scientifically dubious ideas used to win convictions. Nascent attempts to study and change this tendency to prolong the use of flawed forensic science initiated by the Obama Administration have been shut down by the Trump Administration.
  • LinkedIn: Closing The Gap In Finance & Entertainment

    In the era of #MeToo and Times’ Up, LinkedIn partnered with CNBC to get a sense of the state of gender across the American workplace. We received more than 2,000 responses from LinkedIn members working in finance, entertainment and the motion picture/film industry in the U.S. Our questions tried to cover both the alleged problems as well as potential solutions, asking respondents to weigh in on if their careers have been impacted by the issues surfaced by the #MeToo and Time's Up movements and their ideas for how to make the industry more inclusive. We then interviewed more than 100 members across the industry to get their analysis through reported featured on the issues. To date, thousands of additional professionals both on and off LinkedIn have joined the larger conversation about the results and their implications for the American workplace.
  • Walking While Black

    “Walking While Black,” a meticulously researched and powerful reporting project, showed Jacksonville's enforcement of pedestrian violations to be racially disproportionate. Using hard-won data from a variety of local and state agencies, Topher Sanders and Ben Conarck, both veterans of reporting in Jacksonville, showed the disparities across every category of pedestrian tickets in Duval County. They then found those ticketed, and chronicled the impact — on their driver’s licenses, on their credit ratings, on their day to day ability to work and raise families in a city notorious for its lack of adequate pedestrian infrastructure.
  • The Trans Train

    The number of teenage girls who are seeking transgender care, has increased with thousands of percentages over the last couple of years. Many of them suffer from other diagnoses, such as Asbergers, ADHD, and self harm behavior. We could reveal that despite this being a new group in the trans gender health care clinics, they get the same treatments as previous patients in the trans gender care sector. Their bodies are transformed with hormones and transgender corrective surgery; sometimes it’s only a matter of weeks from the first visit at the clinic until the treatment commences.
  • Murder with Impunity

    Whether your murder is solved can sometimes depend on where you're killed. The Post found disparities in who gets justice and who's still waiting.