Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "tracing" ...

  • WEWS-TV: Prescription for Failure

    In the last two decades, prescription opioids have taken an unrelenting hold on Ohio. The opioid crisis has claimed the lives of thousands of users, landing Ohio on a top five list no one wants to be on: the most opioid-related overdose deaths in the country. For years, media across the country and the state have reported about the devastating impacts of the crisis, but during its exclusive investigation, the WEWS 5 On Your Side Investigative team was the first to uncover the “why.” The team spent six months tracing the opioid crisis to its beginning as well as examining how the state medical board, the group charged with regulating doctors, played a role.
  • Investigating Gun Tracing

    Investigative Units from NBC Bay Area and NBC10 Philadelphia combined forces to uncover flaws in the way federal, state and local agents trace firearms through a technology meant to connect crimes through ballistics testing. While the technology is promising the team discovered, for the first time, that political infighting and sometimes simple bureaucratic inertia prevented the technology from even being consistently used, leaving some communities vulnerable to gun violence that could otherwise have been prevented.
  • Comfort Women: Ep1. War Crime, Ep2.The Nation Gave Them Up

    For the 73rd anniversary of the National Liberation Day of Korea, this program aims to report the Japanese government’s denial of forced recruitment comfort women and operation of comfort station by the Japanese military during the Japanese ruling of Korea. This program also traces the whereabouts of the 20 Korean comfort women found in Myitkyina, Myanmar, to suggest how to solve the current comfort women issues. Through the recorded voice files of the interrogations of 4 Japanese officers and soldiers, this program analyses their views on comfort women. The program also found out that Japanese military was solely responsible for forced recruitment and control of comfort women, and the establishment and operation of comfort stations through 783 interrogation reports about 1105 Japanese POW during the three years from 1942. Also, the program offers plans on how to solve the comfort women issue such as international solidarity measures by tracing the 20 Korean comfort women that were dragged to Myitkyina, Myanmar, by the Japanese military to find out whether they are still alive or where they have died, and what our government has done for them.
  • CBS THIS MORNING: Cobalt Mining in the DRC

    Our CBS This Morning investigation into cobalt mining in the DRC and its subsequent impact was the kind of journalism we feel privileged to do. We saw an injustice being done in a corner of the world most Americans rarely get to see, and uniquely that injustice could be directly be tied to our everyday lives. The process of tracing our batteries to the small hands that help to make them was a 6-month marathon of searching for clues in what seemed like a black hole of information.
  • Haaretz Investigation: Israeli Corporations Gave Millions to West Bank Settlements

    In this investigative project, Blau looks into how tax-exempt dollars raised in the U.S. end up sustaining illegal Jewish settlements in the West Bank—in direct contravention of longstanding U.S. policy. He systematically analyzed the financial files and tax filings of dozens of American non-profits and their partners in Israel. In an on-going series of stories published by Haaretz, Blau reported that these U.S.-based groups funneled more than $220 million to Jewish settlements during the five-year period between 2009-2013. He found that the money is being spent on everything from new air conditioning units in settlement housing to support payments for the families of convicted Jewish terrorists. By painstakingly tracing, documenting and reporting on the fund-raising and spending of these groups, Blau’s project sheds new light on America's complicated relationship with one of its closest allies. It has stirred heated debate and thoughtful discussion in this country and Israel, including a prominent mention in The New York Times editorial pages and an op-ed (written by Blau) in The Washington Post. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BVmWgzpAXX0 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0XGsd1LreCY https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JyQ9xBbDbrw https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ACKIAMMK0OY
  • Subversives

    "Subversives" reveals the FBI's covert operations at the University of California during the Cold War through the bureau's involvement with three iconic figures who clashed at Berkeley in the sixties: Governor Ronald Reagan; UC President Clark Kerr; and student leader Mario Savio. By tracing these narratives, "Subversives" tells a dramatic story of FBI illegal break-ins, infiltrations, planted news stories, poison pen letters, and secret detention lists.
  • ATF Gun Tracing

    CBS News obtained exclusive access to the National Tracing Center operated by the Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms in Martinsburg, West Virginia In our piece, we took the public behind the scenes of this massive facility in the heart of rural West Virginia to show how a gun is traced, guns used in crimes such as the Newtown Ct. mass shootings, Aurora, Colorado theater shooting, and that of Congresswoman Gabby Giffords in Arizona.
  • Civilian Casualties in Afghanistan

    This multi-part print and online investigation, including an extensive, interactive database of incidents involving the deaths of Afghan civilians at the hands of U.S and allied forces, provides the first comprehensive look into collateral damage in the war in Afghanistan over the years 2001 through 2013.* Approximately 30,000 words in all, the package of articles uncovers faulty and profoundly inadequate efforts to count the dead and to keep track of civilian casualties, the gaps and missteps involved in efforts by the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) and its office for protection of civilians to account for civilian casualties, serious flaws in the U.S. military’s (classified) database called the Civilian Casualty Tracking Cell (and parallel units), and the lack of any serious effort by the Pentagon to create an Office of Civilian Protection for “lessons learned.” The package examines the practice of lethal profiling of so-called “military age males” throughout the U.S. chain of command and exposes its pernicious effect on American rules of engagement in Afghanistan. It also reports on studies, including those performed by the U.S. military itself, on the measurable and quantifiable effect of civilian casualties in “creating insurgents.” In additional features published online, we report on the haphazard record-keeping and lack of a coherent policy when it comes to payment of reparations for civilians killed in Afghanistan. And we closely examine three mass-casualty incidents involving Afghan civilians, tracing how they resulted from changes in the Pentagon’s own commander directives and guidelines to the troops in the field. *The interactive database concludes at the end of 2012, the last year for which a full data set was available at the time of publication.
  • The Magnitsky Affair

    The Magnitsky project uncovered how nearly a billion dollars that disappeared from the Russian treasury ended up in offshore accounts, paper companies and apartments in New York City to the benefit of two privileged Russians and their associates. The Russian government had maintain that tracing the lost money was impossible because important records had been lost in what they described as an accident. They never tried, but OCCRP reporters painstakingly combed through hard-to-obtain bank records, land records and other documents to trace the money as it was hidden, transferred and laundered. The project has sparked investigations in a handful of countries, won numerous journalism accolades and has kept alive the memory of Segei Magnitsky, the Russian lawyer turned whistleblower who paid with his life for trying to expose the corrupt theft of tax money in Moscow.
  • "Under the Curse of Cartels"

    This project gave readers an unprecedented look at the highly-organized drug trafficking organizations that had taken control of Oregon's drug underworld. This was not just a report about drug dealing. This was about execution-style murders never before publicly linked to Mexican drug cartels. This was about tracing how a cartel-linked trafficker set up a national drug distribution network from rural towns in Oregon. This was about the price paid by end users, including a harrowing account of a young man's death from a heroin overdose. Drug arrests were not news in Oregon. Police agencies routinely issue press releases, prosecutors hold news conferences, and photos of seized drugs and money handed out. That's where the coverage often ends. "Under the Curse of Cartels" documented the true scale behind this drug trafficking -- the sophisticated organizations, their ruthless control, and their elaborate counter-surveillance efforts to detect police investigations. The project took reporting on drug trafficking to a new level with the intimate insider details from both sides of the law. The series was a shocking wake up for Oregon, including many in the law enforcement community who didn't have access to the kind of information collated by The Oregonian.