Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "trade" ...

  • Bargaining the Badge: How Hundreds of Accused Texas Officers Avoid Prison

    Across Texas, hundreds of law enforcement officers have permanently surrendered their peace officer licenses in the past four years. A KXAN investigation of 297 of those surrenders uncovered nearly all the officers were accused or charged with a crime – most often felonies. KXAN also found this system allows some bad officers to operate under the radar for years. Through internal police department and court records, KXAN found several cases of officers accused repeatedly of misconduct. In those instances, the accused police officers were able to trade their badges in a plea bargain and walk away with probation.
  • Silicon Valley’s Hidden Figures

    Silicon Valley has a big diversity problem. But no one has been able to comprehensively quantify it until now. Some of the multibillion-dollar companies that fuel the global economy have sought to hide how few women and people of color they have in their organizations, refusing to release the data, claiming the information is a trade secret. We built the largest and most comprehensive database of diversity employment data for Silicon Valley available. Through a groundbreaking collaboration with a University of Massachusetts Amherst sociologist, we got Equal Employment Opportunity Council (EEOC) data for 177 of the largest tech companies through public records requests and a successful FOIA lawsuit. Through this data, we uncovered disparities and ranked companies based on their diversity scores. By establishing a baseline of comparative data, we were able to hold companies accountable for their diversity hiring practices for the first time. Because of our analysis, the public now knows some of the worst companies when it comes to diversity in Silicon Valley. But we also found that diversity is not an impossible goal to achieve for technology companies: some are doing much better than their peers.
  • WSJ: When Wall Street Flips Municipal Bonds, Towns and Schools Pay the Price

    A yearlong investigation uncovered how Wall Street firms profit and local governments often lose out when they sell bonds in the municipal market. The Wall Street Journal combined sources to create an unprecedented database of municipal bond trades to show how the securities firms governments pay to sell their debt routinely underprice those bonds, unload them with very little risk, then often buy them back at higher prices. Those not bought back also run up in price as other securities firms snap them up and resell them.
  • The Daily News: The 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund

    During the course of reporting on the anniversary of the September 11, 2001, attacks on the World Trade Center, Daily News reporter Thomas Tracy spoke with an official on the record who said that the 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund was running out of money. Tracy broke the news exclusively that the fund would not have enough money to help all survivors sickened at Ground Zero.
  • Rocky Mountain PBS / Insight with John Ferrugia: Traded and Trafficked

    Through innovative storytelling and community outreach, “Traded and Trafficked” has sparked constructive conversations in communities across the state of Colorado and inspired citizens in rural and suburban areas to take action against child sex trafficking.
  • Dirty Gold, Clean Cash

    "Dirty Gold, Clean Cash" was an extensive Miami Herald investigation sparked by a federal court case into how organized crime groups, including narco-traffickers, are using destructive illegal gold mines in Latin America to launder money through precious metals -- metals which ultimately end up in the hands of unsuspecting American consumers as jewelry, electronics and bullion. The trade has a crucial logistical hub in Miami. The series required extensive on-the-ground reporting in Peru and Colombia, a challenge for a local paper like the Miami Herald but one which the paper was prepared for because of its longstanding commitment to foreign reporting.
  • The Traffickers: The Girl in the Window

    The Traffickers is an investigative documentary series which traces the global trafficking routes of some of the world’s most sought after commodities: Gold, exotic animals, sex, even human body parts - anything can be bought for a price. The aim was ambitious - to give an exclusive guide to the global black market world, with high production values, excellent cinematography, dynamic story-telling and outstanding journalism. The series is presented by Nelufar Hedayat, who herself was trafficked as a child refugee from war-torn Afghanistan. During the course of filming, Nelufar visited 22 different countries, criss-crossing the world to follow the story. The Dark Side of Adoption reveals how American couples adopting babies from the DRC can be caught up in an adoption scam which hoodwinks unsuspecting parents into giving up their children.
  • Rhino Horn Trafficking

    Poaching rhino for horn has decimated the species, corrupted law enforcement from rangers to prosecutors, judges, and politicians, and resulted in the killing of rangers and poachers throughout the rhinos’ range. Unlike elephants whose ivory tusks do not grow back, rhino horn can be sawed off and it will regrow, opening an opportunity to farm the species. This story investigates the highly controversial effort by the South African game industry to farm rhino as a proposed solution to the international trafficking problem. In particular, two South Africans who hold the key to the rhino’s future, have used lawsuits and, in one case, a shell plaintiff to block major criminal actions in South Africa and the United States, as well as to force the lifting of South Africa’s ban on rhino horn trade.
  • The Drug Trade

    Our graphic story and accompanying interactive summarized an analysis of generic and brand-name price increases for thousands of drugs. While smaller startup and investment companies grabbed headlines with dramatic increases in drug prices, our investigation showed that big pharmaceutical companies like AstraZeneca and Novartis raised prices by as much as 250 times over three years.
  • Meatpackers Struggled to Sell Import-Labeled Beef

    Country-of-origin labeling, trade, cattle & beef prices U.S. meatpackers struggled to sell import-labeled beef and country-of-origin labels did not significantly affect beef and cattle prices. Both findings undermined the arguments for removing country-of-origin labeling at the behest of the meatpacking industry, which stood to benefit from the removal to the detriment of domestic ranchers.