Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "trauma" ...

  • The CBS Evening News with Norah O’Donnell: Chicago Wrong Raids

    The CBS Evening News and the WBBM investigative team revealed an alarming pattern of Chicago Police officers raiding the wrong homes, traumatizing innocent families and children, and, in the process, violating citizens’ Fourth Amendment rights. None of the officers involved had been disciplined or held accountable by the department.
  • The Killing Rooms of Mosul

    Mosul’s reconstruction – investigating the continued impact of the worst urban fighting since the Second World War. We wanted to measure the scale of the devastation in Mosul’s Old City and understand what the residents were still going through nine months after the fighting had ended. What we found was a traumatized city with dead bodies still rotting in the open, and buildings containing terrible secrets of violence, death, and possible un-investigated war crimes.
  • Just a Game?

    Fans of the National Football League cannot ignore the growing body of evidence revealing that the game is hurting – and perhaps killing – many of the men who play it. In a series of reports, KING 5 put a laser focus on Seattle’s hometown team, to show fans the devastating impacts on former Seahawks players. The two-year project included player surveys, interviews and documentation that exposed the challenges faced by Seahawks in their football afterlives.
  • The Innocents: How U.S. Immigration Policy Punishes Migrant Children

    Federal immigration policies that separated children from their families at the U.S.-Mexico border had real, traumatic consequences on the most vulnerable members of our society. This series of exclusive investigations identified “tender age shelters” warehousing babies and toddlers, exposed a Virginia shelter where migrant teenagers described horrific abuse and followed a Salvadoran mother who came close to losing her daughter to adoption, revealing the legal possibility that separated children could be permanently taken from their parents. AP also followed the money, highlighting the billion-dollar business in migrant child detention, a sector that has grown tenfold in the last decade. Just before year’s end, AP broke the news that the government was keeping most of the 14,000 migrant kids in its care in shelters with hundreds of others, despite expert warnings that mass institutionalization can cause life-long trauma. Based on deep source reporting and exclusive data, the story was the first to provide the number of children in every government-contracted detention center, shelter and foster care program dating back to 2017 - data the government had been withholding all year.
  • Alternative schools bear the brunt of student deaths in Chicago

    This investigative story shines a light on why Chicago students who’ve died are most likely to attend an alternative school and the lack of resources these schools have historically been provided by Chicago Public Schools to help students cope with the deaths of their classmates and other traumas. While many stories have focused on how Chicago’s gun violence hurts children and teens, this story used never-before-published data and more than 50 interviews to examine how gun violence is impacting the education of some of the city’s most vulnerable students. Public alternative high schools are often considered schools of “last resort” that take in children who’ve had discipline, attendance and academic issues in their prior schools. It’s often where students with gang affiliations and safety concerns are sent. And it’s where students are most likely to die.
  • Life & Death: Homicide rates and trauma care in Cumberland County

    This story examined the impact advances in trauma care on homicide rates in our rural county in Pennsylvania. While homicide rates have dropped rapidly since the mid-1990s, the aggravated assault rate has not. The theory behind the assertion is the only difference between a serious aggravated assault and a homicide is that a homicide results in a death. If more patients are being saved through advances in trauma care, the homicide rate would drop without a reduction in the underlying violent crime. The lethality of assaults dropped in Cumberland County from more than 10 percent in 1995 to less than two percent in 2015. Had lethality remained at the 1995, the number of homicides in Cumberland County 1995 and 2015 would have doubled from 48 deaths to 100.
  • Tucson ministry a cult, former followers say

    An investigation by Arizona Daily Star reporters Carol Ann Alaimo and Emily Bregel revealed that a local ministry, Faith Christian Church, had for decades been aggressively recruiting members on the University of Arizona’s campus, leaving in its wake a trail of traumatized former members who describe the church as a cult. Their stories — told independently over weeks of reporting — were remarkably similar. They included reports of hitting infants who exhibit a “rebellious spirit,” financial coercion, alienation from parents, public shaming of members and shunning of those who leave the church or question its leaders. After leaving, some say they spent years in therapy for panic attacks, depression, flashbacks and other symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder.
  • The Settlement

    Armen Keteyian reports on the NFL's controversial concussion settlement and the pivotal Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy or CTE issue. In addition to family members of a retired NFL star who committed suicide, he speaks to formers players, their lawyers and a neuroscientist for the most significant television report yet on the subject.
  • Missed Treatment: Soldiers With Mental Health Issues Dismissed For ‘Misconduct’

    We revealed for the first time that the Army has kicked out tens of thousands of soldiers who came back from Iraq and Afghanistan with mental health problems and traumatic brain injuries, and taken away their benefits, on the grounds that those soldiers committed some sort of “misconduct”– despite the fact that Congress passed a law in 2009 to try to prevent it. Our stories were not only the first ones that revealed this crucial information: Army officials told us that until we asked and pushed for these statistics under FOIA, they never compiled them, period.Our report also showed that a top-level Army investigation, into allegations that soldiers were being mistreated, was essentially a whitewash. And we let the public hear, for the first time, actual psychotherapy sessions between a troubled soldier and Army psychiatrists. You can actually hear the therapists belittle the soldier and shrug off his mental health problems. http://www.npr.org/2015/10/28/451146230/missed-treatment-soldiers-with-mental-health-issues-dismissed-for-misconduct
  • Could Financial Planning Help Stem the Rate of Military Suicides?

    Most Americans believe the hundreds of soldiers (and many more veterans) who kill themselves every year do so over lingering combat trauma. They’re likely wrong. Financial Planning senior editor Ann Marsh's investigation into military suicide turned a spotlight on an overlooked but leading factor in the epidemic: financial distress.