Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

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Search results for "troopers" ...

  • State Police Troopers, Supervisors Charged in Overtime Scandal

    Dozens of respected members of the Massachusetts State Police are suspended, so far ten have been criminally charged, and the investigations by federal and state prosecutors are continuing with more arrests expected in 2019. All of this is the result of a massive overtime scheme that was uncovered by 5 Investigates, the investigative team at WCVB in Boston. This is a precedent setting scandal that has unfolded in Massachusetts since our initial investigation. The work of 5 Investigates began in 2017 with dozens of public records requests and our first story in October that revealed supervisors and troopers who appeared to be earning thousands of dollars in overtime they never worked. By early 2018, we began to see significant developments -- suspensions, arrests for theft of taxpayer money, and a response from the Governor that resulted in some of the largest reforms within the State Police that Massachusetts has ever seen.
  • Austin American-Statesman: Is Texas DPS skewing its border security stats - again?

    Texas Department of Public Safety Director Steven McCraw went before Congress in April and touted nearly 40,000 arrests stemming from the department’s border surge of troopers in the Rio Grande Valley. The American-Statesman has long held DPS accountable when it comes to its border activities, and especially in how it has described the success of those efforts to lawmakers. With this story, we sought to continue in that watchdog role.
  • State police vague on internal misconduct despite reforms

    The Pennsylvania State Police investigate its own troopers for officer-involved shootings. Only once since 2008 was a shooting deemed improper. All others were justified, though almost no public information on investigations has been released. The police declined to even say how many residents were killed. Relatedly, we investigated the lack of transparency in internal discipline and how officers are rarely fired, despite dozens of potentially fireable offenses outlined in internal reports.
  • Charity Cheats?

    A Texas agency that disguises itself as a charity for troopers is actually a union collecting money to lobby politicians in Austin.
  • Racial Profiling Whitewash

    This KXAN investigation uncovered state and local law enforcement agencies wrongly reporting the race of minority drivers during traffic stops. KXAN analyzed more than 16 million Texas Department of Public Safety traffic stop records and revealed the state law enforcement agency systematically under-reported the number of minorities, mostly Hispanics, stopped on Texas roads by state troopers. The investigation questioned the validity of DPS racial profiling reports and led to immediate statewide changes in the way Texas troopers conduct traffic stops and record racial profiling data. KXAN found the same problem in the Austin Police Department which prompted an immediate audit of APD's traffic stop data and race recording practices which found APD in violation of the Texas racial profiling law. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3kEG0q7WR1U
  • What killed Kenwin Garcia?

    To most in New Jersey, Kenwin Garcia, a 25-year-old from Newark, was invisible. He had no job, no kids, and spent most days in his room at his father’s house listening to reggae. So when he died in 2008 after being restrained by state troopers on the side of a busy highway, few gave the incident more than passing notice. During the next six years, the story of Garcia’s death was systematically hidden from the public. Investigative files were kept secret. When Garcia’s family sued, a judge ordered that discovery be kept confidential. And when the family settled last year, the agreement required that no one discuss anything about the case. That all changed Oct. 1, when NJ Advance Media published a stunning expose about Garcia’s death in The Star-Ledger that revealed differing accounts of what happened, serious questions about the cause of death and how troopers treated Garcia, and conflicts of interest in the system that cleared them of wrongdoing. The five-month investigation and follow-up stories led to new legislation and major changes to trooper training.
  • Hidden Behind the Badge

    For more than a decade, the New Jersey State Police had to answer to a federal monitor after admissions the force engaged in racial profiling on state highways in the late 1990s. That oversight ended in 2009, but "Hidden Behind the Badge," a yearlong investigation by The Star-Ledger’s Christopher Baxter, showed many of the State Police’s bad habits remain. In a remarkable run of reporting throughout 2012, Baxter exposed actions by troopers that shocked the public, drew national attention, prompted unprecedented shakeups of top brass and spurred new state investigations, suspensions, criminal charges and legislation. He also got the attention of New Jersey’s most powerful political leaders by digging into how the State Police operates, showing whistleblowers fear career-killing reprisals for speaking up, proving the promotion system is more subjective than nearly any other in the country and raising questions about training to recognize diabetic shock.
  • Moonlight Patrol

    After a grueling odyssey through the Pennslyvania courts, the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review and the Associated Press obtained heavily redacted copies of 1,038 supplemental employment forms filed over the previous six and a half years by state troopers and the agency's civilian employees. Despite assurances to the contrary, the Trib uncovered numerous violations of statute and state regulations regarding the after-hours employment of the police.
  • Road to Nowhere:The men who are caught transporting illegal immigrants rarely pay the price

    A Colorado law passed to prohibit human smuggling has proven to be difficult to enforce. Most charges against human smugglers are dismissed or don't end up in court.
  • Crusier Crashes

    The Massachusetts State Troopers have caused nearly 500 cruiser crashes since 2000, most of which occurred while they were commuting or on regular patrol. However troopers are allowed to investigate themselves for accidents with less than $1000 in damages. "About 120 troopers have had four or more accidents over the past seven years."