Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "understaffed" ...

  • Kaiser Health News: Nursing home investigations

    In a series of data-driven stories, Kaiser Health News revealed that tens of thousands of nursing home residents are dying because the facilities are woefully understaffed and painful infections are routinely left untreated or poorly cared for. In the most horrific cases, patients are cycling in out of hospitals with open wounds or bedsores that trigger sepsis or septic shock, a deadly bloodstream infection that is the leading killer in hospital ICUs.
  • Nursing home staffing-related investigations

    More than 1.3 million Americans spend their final months or years in a nursing home and many suffer from inattention, poor care, or outright neglect. But just how much they suffer – and why many die as a result – was hidden until now. In a series of data-driven stories, Kaiser Health News revealed that tens of thousands are dying because the facilities are woefully understaffed and painful infections are routinely left untreated or poorly cared for. In the most horrific cases, patients are cycling in out of hospitals with open wounds or bedsores that trigger sepsis or septic shock, a deadly bloodstream infection that is the leading killer in hospital ICUs.
  • Suffering in Secret

    Illinois steered thousands of its poorest and most vulnerable adults with disabilities into less expensive private group homes and cloaked harm and death with secrecy and silence. The Tribune exposed flawed investigations (two cases were reopened) and revealed how Illinois had publicly undercounted abuse and neglect cases for five years. The Tribune identified 1,311 cases of harm since July 2011 and tracked at least 42 deaths in group homes or their day programs over the last seven years. Additionally, the Tribune uncovered a secretive state practice that allowed group home employees to police their own businesses. The Tribune also detailed a state auction in which group home executives raised hands to select individuals with disabilities to be moved from state facilities into the community. For the first time, the Tribune circumvented state secrecy to show that many group homes were underfunded, understaffed and dangerously unprepared for new arrivals with complex needs.
  • Understaffed and Underserved

    "Understaffed and Underserved: A Look Inside America’s Nursing Homes" exposed staffing discrepancies, racial disparities and billions of dollars in questionable HUD-backed mortgages granted to facilities across the country, revealing the intersection of nursing home companies’ profit-driven practices with weak governmental oversight that all too often leads to devastating, and even fatal, consequences for some of the nation’s most vulnerable citizens. The project generated widespread media pickup, resulted in the filing of federal legislation, the GAO saying it would investigate the five-star rating system and contributed to federal policy change by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Advocates throughout the nation used data from the project to advocate for legislative change, while a law professor had her students do field testing for a potential civil rights law suit and plans to request HUD Secretary Julian Castro to initiate a complaint against a Chicago-area nursing home chain.
  • Understaffed and Underserved: A Look Inside America’s Nursing Homes

    "Understaffed and Underserved: A Look Inside America’s Nursing Homes" exposed staffing discrepancies, racial disparities and billions of dollars in questionable HUD-backed mortgages granted to facilities across the country, revealing the intersection of nursing home companies’ profit-driven practices with weak governmental oversight that all too often leads to devastating, and even fatal, consequences for some of the nation’s most vulnerable citizens. The project generated widespread media pickup and resulted in state and federal politicians pledging to take action.
  • KRIS-TV: The Trouble with TEA

    Series focused on the lengths educators will go to cover up teacher misconduct by focusing on one teacher, in particular, who bounced from school district to another, always leaving amid accusations of misconduct with female students. Our reporting uncovered the uncomfortable fact that: *All too often, a teacher can break local and state rules on professional conduct but, because the misconduct never leads to formal criminal charges, the teacher is protected. *School districts will deliberately alter public records to protect a teacher from unflattering publicity. *The investigative arm of the state education agency is woefully understaffed and overwhelmed. *School districts cannot always afford to pursue termination proceedings due to the threat of a costly lawsuit from the teacher. Instead, they'll let the teacher resign. *Even state lawmakers now admit the investigative arm of the state education is in dire need of changes.
  • SCDSS: The System Failed

    A News19 report on a 4 year old boy named Robert Guinyard Jr., who despite multiple reports of abuse, died in state care, put the spotlight on former South Carolina Department of Social Services (DSS) State Director Lillian Koller. Our investigation found multiple instances where policy says DSS should have stepped in. It would take the agency two months to publicly admit to a Senate Oversight Committee that policies were not followed in the case. The DSS Deputy State Director for Child Protective Services told us, “the system failed Robert.” News 19 reported at least 36 stories about DSS in 2014 on-air, online, and on mobile platforms. Our investigation led to the resignation of the agency’s State Director, policy changes in the Child Protective Services division, and increased funding to an understaffed guardian ad litum group that advocates for kids in state custody.
  • Positive

    "The state of Illinois has increased its HIV spending by tens of millions of dollars-creating two new grant programs designed to combat the epidemic among African Americans. One of the grant programs was mismanaged and much of the funding does not target the highest risk population." Furthermore, the health department and non-profits were either understaffed or waiting for the funds to be received before they could treat anyone.
  • Losing Track: NC's Troubled Probation System

    North Carolina's probation system has been in disarray for years. Probation officers are overworked and understaffed, and offenders often receive little or no supervision. Top managers ignored problems for years and killed promising projects to monitor offenders.
  • Tarnished Badges

    A loop hole in South Carolina law allows for law enforcement officers to continue working in the police force despite having a history of misconduct and criminal behaviors. Also the agency in charge of monitoring and disciplining the officers was discovered to be understaffed and underfunded.