Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "universities" ...

  • Tainted Water

    Canadians have every reason to believe that the water that runs from their taps is beyond reproach: abundant, clean and safe. But the “Tainted Water” investigation, an unprecedented national collaboration of universities and news organizations, exposed the risks faced by millions of Canadians whose drinking water contains elevated levels of lead, a powerful, insidious neurotoxin, and other contaminants. Coordinated by the staff at the Institute for Investigative Journalism (IIJ), “Tainted Water” is the largest project of its kind in Canadian history, and possibly the largest student-led project worldwide. The consortium brought together more than 120 journalists, student journalists and faculty members from nine post-secondary institutions and six news organizations and their bureaus over a period of 18 months to report the series. Journalism students and reporters combined their findings and produced local, regional and national investigative features, released as a series of print, digital and TV stories, making international headlines.
  • In Donors We Trust

    Everyone knows that college is more and more expensive to attend. So why are college and university endowments skyrocketing and now worth more than $567 billion? We started with the University of Michigan, lauded as one of the world’s best public universities which had stockpiled an endowment worth more than $11 billion. We found that university officials invested a good chunk of that endowment – one of the country’s largest among public institutions - in hundreds of private funds across the world. More importantly, our months-long investigation identified a select group who had secretly benefited: top university donors and alumni investment advisers who run private equity, hedge and venture capital funds and real estate investment firms. After our stories published throughout 2018, the university changed its investment policies; rerouted nearly $2 million into more student aid; made new investments based in the state; publicly released university executive compensation information after losing a FOIA lawsuit brought by the Free Press; and saw two university regents (i.e., trustees) lose their elections in November to those who promised more financial transparency and accountability based on our reporting.
  • Hate in America

    Hate in America,” an investigation examining intolerance, racism and hate crimes, is the 2018 project of the Carnegie-Knight News21 program, a national multimedia reporting project produced by the nation’s top journalism students and graduates. Journalism students from 19 universities traveled to 36 states, conducted hundreds of interviews, and reviewed thousands of pages of federal-court documents, FBI data and state and federal statutes.
  • ‘I Never Thought It Would Happen’: USC Students Share Stories of Sexual Assault

    As universities nationwide work to address the issue of sexual assault on campus, Annenberg Media sought to find out how such incidents were unfolding at USC. In the course of months-long reporting on this story, we combed through DPS logs, interviewed survivors and mapped out locations of reported assaults. http://www.uscannenbergmedia.com/2016/11/14/i-never-thought-it-would-happen-usc-students-share-stories-of-sexual-assault/
  • Degree of Deception

    A lawsuit filed by a former Queens University accusing her alma mater of mishandling her reported sexual assault prompted us to dig deeper and find out how other area universities were handling sexual assault on campus. Our questions prompted four schools to amend their Clery reports,a report required by federal law outlining the number of certain types of crimes that happen on campus, to add additional reported sexual assaults. Following our first story into Queens University, the school settled its lawsuit and amended its Clery report. Ultimately, our investigation prompted four colleges and universities to amend their Clery reports to add sexual assaults. https://youtu.be/fJoKjUmt3DU
  • Robin Hood in Reverse

    An investigation of Ohio’s eight largest public universities found that with one exception, trustees and administrators imposed hidden fees on thousands of working-class students to subsidize money-losing athletic departments while allowing academic spending to nosedive.
  • Sports At Any Cost

    We teamed up with The Chronicle of Higher Education to tell how in an era of soaring college costs and mounting student debt, universities are spending billions of dollars to prop up their sports departments. Our overview feature showcases deep reporting from Georgia State, which has invested millions into a football program that hasn't attracted much support.
  • Masking the Pain

    A yearlong investigation into the widespread misuse of narcotics, numbing agents, and other pain-killing & anti-inflammatory injections, like Toradol, inside college sports locker rooms. FOX31 Denver spent months fighting with dozens of major universities, including all of Colorado’s NCAA-certified athletic programs, for medication purchasing records, sports drug policies, and use of pain-killing injections and pills on “game-day” athletes.
  • Telemundo 39 Diploma Mills

    Diploma mills have become prominent in North Texas. These businesses open shop as alleged private schools in small offices and offer home-school programs. They promised people a high school diploma in exchange of a flat fee. They take advantage of a loophole in Texas Law that protects home-school students from being discriminated by colleges or universities. People running these diploma mills are making thousands of dollars selling bogus diplomas, and the students are finding out the hard way. Some of them realize that the diplomas are useless when applying for work or for financial aid. After their broadcast, the group of students showcased in the first part received a money order with a refund for their diploma fee.
  • Data show that poorer families are bearing the brunt of college price hikes

    In an 11-month project, The Hechinger Report empirically tested the oft-repeated claim of universities and colleges that they are helping low-income students afford the cost of higher education. The Report analyzed federal data to determine the net price -- what students are actually charged, after discounts and financial aid are taken into account -- at thousands of colleges and universities. The Report found many schools increased the net price much faster for their lowest-income students than for wealthier ones. Sidebars also showed that federal financial aid, including tax credits and the work-study program, disproportionately benefit the rich. And in a followup, using a successive year of data later made available during 2014, The Hechinger Report reported that 100 colleges and universities that promised at a White House summit to make higher education more affordable for the lowest-income students had actually raised their prices faster for the poorest students than for wealthier ones. The project included a unique, first-of-its-kind, easy-to-use, searchable website called Tuition Tracker (tuitiontracker.org) through which readers could find any college and university and see how its net price has changed, by any of five income groupings.