Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "vaccines" ...

  • Uncovered: The Vaccine Debate

    In this exclusive investigation, Full Measure uncovered evidence that the federal government covered up scientific evidence and testimony that childhood vaccines can trigger autism in certain susceptible children. This evidence was made known to Department of Justice attorneys by their own scientific expert as the government fought vaccine-autism claims. The expert, Johns Hopkins pediatric neurologist Dr. Andrew Zimmerman, is one of world’s leading authorities in his field.
  • Vaccine Glass

    Vaccine maker Sanofi Pasteur discovered tiny pieces of glass in batches of a vaccine intended for babies. But Sanofi did not issue a recall. Rather, it allowed doctors and nurses throughout the country to continue injecting babies with glass for another year and a half.
  • NBC5 Investigates: Vaccine Vacuum

    By analyzing several rarely-used state databases, NBC5 Investigates found hundreds of Chicago-area schools allowing tens of thousands of schoolchildren into their classrooms with no evidence of immunizations – at levels considered unsafe by state and federal health officials. Yet no one seems to be doing much about it.
  • The Fracking Boom: Missing Answers

    Is hydraulic fracking for natural gas safe? That’s one of the big questions surrounding America’s fracking boom. Homeowners with these gas wells literally in their backyards have complained of contaminated drinking water wells and noxious fumes. The natural gas industry has said that except for the occasional accident, fracking is not to blame. The American Petroleum Institute, the trade group for the natural gas industry, says fracking is safe and there’s no proof that the practice causes significant damage to the environment or human health. In our series, NPR decided to investigate the evidence the industry bases its safety claim on, and we found something astonishing. Despite some 200,000 fracked wells, very little data have been collected and few rigorous studies have been done to show whether fracking is safe, or whether it is dangerous. Not by local officials, state officials, universities or federal agencies. Essentially there is a data void on this issue. The type of scientific work that tied lead, tobacco smoke and smog to health problems, or that exonerated vaccines as the cause of autism, has not been done. With its safety claim, the industry is actively misleading the public into believing its practices have been solidly vetted and found untarnished. As we show in our seven part series, this is far from the truth.
  • The Fracking Boom, Missing Answers

    Is hydraulic fracking for natural gas safe? That’s one of the big questions surrounding America’s fracking boom. Homeowners with these gas wells literally in their backyards have complained of contaminated drinking water wells and noxious fumes. The natural gas industry has said that except for the occasional accident, fracking is not to blame. The American Petroleum Institute, the trade group for the natural gas industry, says fracking is safe and there’s no proof that the practice causes significant damage to the environment or human health. In our series, NPR decided to investigate the evidence the industry bases its safety claim on, and we found something astonishing. Despite some 200,000 fracked wells, very little data have been collected and few rigorous studies have been done to show whether fracking is safe, or whether it is dangerous. Not by local officials, state officials, universities or federal agencies. Essentially there is a data void on this issue. The type of scientific work that tied lead, tobacco smoke and smog to health problems, or that exonerated vaccines as the cause of autism, has not been done. With its safety claim, the industry is actively misleading the public into believing its practices have been solidly vetted and found untarnished. As we show in our seven part series, this is far from the truth.
  • Colorado Humane Society

    "Using informed sources and dozens of hours of hidden camera investigating, the 7 News investigative team uncovered fraud, mismanagement, a lack of fiscal accountability, a failure to follow sate laws and inadequate and improper care" of animals at the Colorado Humane Society.
  • Evidence of Harm: Mercury in Vaccines and the Autism Epidemic -- A Medical Controversy

    Kirby investigates whether the mercury-based preservative thimerosal, which was used in an increasing number of childhood vaccines in the 1990s, led to the large number of cases of autism, ADD, ADHD and other childhood disorders that were reported in the United States during the same period.
  • Missouri Chicken Pox Vaccine

    This reporter working closely with the Joint Committee on Administrative Rules checks out why there is opposition to a law making Chicken Pox vaccines mandatory. According to this story, this issue is being debated in other states such as Illinois since some medical professionals are against the inoculations.
  • Vaccines

    This three-part investigation focuses on an additive in vaccines called Thimerosal. The investigation reported that Thimerosal contains about 50 percent mercury and was first created and sold by Eli Lilly, a pharmaceutical company. Thimerosal has been used for over 70 years even though research has indicated that mercury is harmful to humans. The report also investigates a possible link between vaccines, Thimerosal and the rise of autism rates in children over the past decade.
  • Vaccine Dangers

    The news team found risks had been concealed from people asked to take the smallpox vaccines. They also expose the military's refusal to admit its vaccines are harming some soldiers; soldiers who are often dismissed and treated like "malingerers." They focused on the case of Rachael Lacy. The military denied her death was from the vaccines it administered but the news team found her death certificate showed otherwise. They also looked at the case of NBC War Correspondent David Bloom who died after his vaccinations. His case was not reported or investigated as a possible vaccine adverse event. They also looked at a Journal of the American Medical Association claiming there had been "no" deaths after smallpox vaccinations.