Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "visual" ...

  • The Myth of the Criminal Immigrant

    Since taking office, President Trump has repeatedly claimed that immigrants bring a tremendous amount of crime into America. He's wrong, and the proof is in the data. This visual piece examines and demonstrates the relationship between immigration and crime in American cities over the past 40 years. Readers can see for themselves that increased immigration does not accompany higher violent crime rates. In fact, immigration is more frequently associated with reduced crime. This is important work: as of 2017, Gallup polls show that almost half of Americans agree that immigrants make crime worse. This research is crucial to debunking the dangerous myth that immigrants lead to crime.
  • NJ.com: The Force Report

    The Force Report is built on five years of data and 72,677 pages of documents. It details every reported incident of police force from 2012 through 2016, at the time the most recent year of data available for the state's 468 local police departments and the State Police. The resulting analysis revealed troubling trends that escaped scrutiny.
  • WSJ: The Forces Behind America's Political Divide

    Why are Americans so divided? The Wall Street Journal set out to answer this question in a set of visually-driven stories that made novel use of economic and demographic data, as well as through an analysis of the original response files from the Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll that unearthed new insights. Our exploration found that America's political divisions are being driven by economic and social forces that are fairly new in politics.
  • The Marshall Project: The Myth of the Criminal Immigrant

    Since taking office, President Trump has repeatedly claimed that immigrants bring a tremendous amount of crime into America. He's wrong, and the proof is in the data. This visual piece examines and demonstrates the relationship between immigration and crime in American cities over the past 40 years. Readers can see for themselves that increased immigration does not accompany higher violent crime rates. In fact, immigration is more frequently associated with reduced crime. This is important work: as of 2017, Gallup polls show that almost half of Americans agree that immigrants make crime worse. This research is crucial to debunking the dangerous myth that immigrants lead to crime.
  • NYT: Visual Investigations

    A new form of investigative journalism finds the culprits in death of Khashoggi, slaying of a Gaza medic, gassing of Syrians and killing of Nigerian protesters.
  • inewsource: Hustling Hope

    inewsource spent months investigating how a California lawyer built a national network of Trina Health clinics to perform what he calls a “miraculous” treatment for reversing the complications of diabetes, even though medical experts consider it a scam that harms patients. Senior healthcare reporter Cheryl Clark tells the story of a couple in rural Montana who invested their life savings into opening their own clinic, in part so the husband could get the treatments locally for his diabetes. Less than two years later, the clinic was shuttered as health insurers refused to pay for the treatment and its founder came under federal investigation. He pleaded guilty in January 2019 to public corruption charges related to his Trina Health operation in Alabama.
  • Perversion of Justice: How a future Trump Cabinet member gave a serial sex abuser the deal of a lifetime

    Miami Herald investigative reporter Julie K. Brown and visual journalist Emily Michot documented how a politically connected mulitmillionaire manipulated the criminal justice system to avoid significant punishment for his obsessive pursuit of sexual encounters with underage girls. Through behind-the-scenes emails, the journalists also demonstrated the remarkably cozy relationship between defendant Jeffrey Epstein's powerhouse legal team and state and federal prosecutors, including U.S. Attorney Alexander Acosta, who is now President Trump's labor secretary. And, in a first, they tracked down and interviewed several of Epstein's victims.
  • Where's the party at?

    The Daily Wildcat set out to answer the age old question: where's the party at? Through FOIAs for police records The Daily Wildcat was able to collect data on where the Tucson Police Department had issued red tags, which are the citations for unruly gatherings that are commonly doled out when parties get out of hand. They created a heat map of the red tags issued around campus and created interactive data visualizations on the frequency of when red tags were issued by day of the week and calendar month.
  • Racial Slurs Are Woven Deep Into The American Landscape

    The removal of the confederate flag from the Statehouse in South Carolina spawned the re-evaluation of confederate symbols across the South. We were curious to know how many other locations across the US still had names that would be considered derogatory in today’s society. We used Vocativ’s proprietary technology identify cities, towns, lakes, springs, mines and local landmarks with a potentially hurtful name. We then created a series of data visualizations including an interactive map that can searched by state to show hundreds of federally recognized places across the nation that include racial slurs in their names. Some examples are Dead Negro Hollow in Tennessee, Wetback Tank in New Mexico and Dead Injun Creek in Oregon.
  • WisconsINjustice

    This series examines the lack of accountability for Wisconsin judges, the isolation they work in and the consequences of that system. It demonstrates that justice in a given case depends largely not on the crime committed, but on the judge the case lands before. It includes about a dozen stories, many interactive databases and visualizations and several videos.