Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "votes" ...

  • 60 Minutes: Hacking Democracy

    During the 2016 presidential election, Russian operatives launched a widespread cyberattack against state voting systems around the country. While officials say no votes were changed on election day, America's election infrastructure remains vulnerable just seven months before the 2018 midterm elections.
  • Stolen Future: The Untold Story of the 2000 Election

    Investigative reporter and New York Times bestselling author Stephen Singular discovered that Florida punch cards could have been manipulated in the still highly debated 2000 presidential election. Using forensic journalism, Singular found evidence that the troubles may not have been random or accidental, as widely reported, but could have been intended to create chaos in largely Democratic and African American precincts, thereby costing Gore tens of thousands of votes. Singular examined the role of the notorious "hanging chads" — and revealed how punch cards could have been designed and targeted for specific constituencies in order to alter the outcome.
  • Election Integrity: The Southern Vote Project

    In our groundbreaking, exclusive, “flood-the-zone” Southern Vote Project, WhoWhatWhy probed the state of election integrity and revealed deep problems, including widespread disenfranchisement of large segments of the voting public. Sending a full-time team to several southern states, we documented a broad range of factors, some seemingly intentional, that resulted in voter suppression or created cybersecurity vulnerabilities. Because we were uniquely focused on this topic, we started breaking stories that other outlets were unwilling or unable to pursue. Our work played an important role in compelling legacy news outlets to begin covering this issue. Our hard-hitting coverage also resulted in several lawsuits, which in turn brought about changes in how votes were counted through court decisions made in the heat of the elections.
  • Oil Empire

    As Texas' oil production has boomed and the Craddick family's oil wealth has increased, so has their political clout. When Christi Craddick assumed elected office as that industry's top regulator in 2013, it ensured the Craddick name would be one of the most powerful and widely-renowned in the state's history. KXAN discovered, since the start of 2014, Craddick voted at least 320 times on agenda items brought by companies that pay her and her family royalties or dividends, according to her personal financial disclosures. We also found she cast more than 100 votes on enforcement actions against those companies.
  • Minnesota's Graduation Gap

    MPR News set out to delve into an underreported fact -- that Minnesota’s high school graduation rates for students of color rank among the very worst in the nation -- and ended up making a profound discovery: Minnesota devotes less to non-classroom student support than any state. The category includes guidance counselors, social workers, nurses and mental health counselors, attendance staff and other positions that education experts says are key to keeping students at risk of dropping out of school on the path to graduations. The link between support spending and graduation rates appears to be stronger than other oft-mentioned factors to explain low rates for students of color. http://www.mprnews.org/story/2016/06/01/grad-gap-highlights
  • Hacking Democracy

    NBC News broke a series of exclusive stories about the U.S. government assessment that Russian intelligence had mounted a covert operation to interfere in the American presidential election, and about efforts to prevent manipulation of the vote itself. http://qlnk.io/ql/58753f16e4b036c5d233fddc http://www.nbcnews.com/nightly-news/video/sources-intel-has-drawn-direct-links-to-russia-in-election-hackings-776086083639
  • Minnesota's Graduation Gap

    MPR News set out to delve into an underreported fact -- that Minnesota’s high school graduation rates for students of color rank among the very worst in the nation -- and ended up making a profound discovery: Minnesota devotes less to non-classroom student support than any state. The category includes guidance counselors, social workers, nurses and mental health counselors, attendance staff and other positions that education experts says are key to keeping students at risk of dropping out of school on the path to graduations. http://www.mprnews.org/story/2016/06/01/grad-gap-highlights
  • How Much Does Your Vote Count

    Using census data and swing state forecasts, this story explores how the electoral college and differences in turnout affect the voting power of Americans of different ages, genders, and races. It includes an interactive tool that lets readers explore the data and calculate their personal voting power score. We found that because many of them live in relatively “safe” states, the power of Black, Hispanic and Asian-American voters to choose the president was lower than that of white voters.
  • Long Florida Voter Lines

    Despite well-reported anecdotes of long voter lines in Florida during the 2008 general election, everyone appeared unprepared and shocked when the same problem emerged in the 2012 general election, with early reports indicating that the voting wait times might have been even worse this time. Orlando Sentinel political reporters David Damron and Scott Powers (who also is a CAR reporter) set out to quantify the problems and determine who was most affected, by seeking, obtaining and analyzing county Supervisor of Elections data on closing times for precincts, and using that data to find human stories about long polling place lines and late, late votes. The effort snowballed from an initial report published Dec. 17, 2012, on four counties in the Orlando Sentinel market, to broader, deeper and more analytical reports that reached statewide, and appeared to be cited in President Barack Obama's Feb. 12 State of the Union speech. Obtaining data from the state's 25 largest counties, and arranging assistance from an Ohio State University professor, the Orlando Sentinel pinpointed where and why long lines developed, and who was affected, and concluded that 200,000 voters might have turned away in frustration. Follow-up stories, showing clear responses from state and federal officials, included contributions from Mark K. Matthews of the Orlando Sentinel's Washington bureau.
  • In precincts with higher minority populations, greater chance of casting provisional ballots

    This story presents an analysis of the percentage of provisional ballots cast in precincts across Maricopa County, Arizona during the November 2012 general election. Maricopa County is home to Sheriff Joe Arpaio, and home to several Hispanic rights groups. After the general election in November, some of the groups claimed Hispanics and other minorities were forced to vote provisionally more often than other groups, increasing the likelihood that their votes wouldn't count. This story confirmed that areas with higher rates of minorities did see higher rates of provisional ballots cast.