Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "welfare" ...

  • Best for the children

    We revealed that at least 150 children have been abused in Sweden over the last three years, despite the fact that social services knew about their situation and should have been able to help them. Almost half of the children were children already in care, therefore even more vulnerable, where the social welfare service failed to act to help them, or acted in a way that increased their suffering. There are most probably many more children that have been abused, than the 150 we were able to detect. We were only able to survey the cases known to the Health and Social Care Inspectorate. But in our review we could reveal that 50 municipalities, one in six, have never reported any mistakes on serious misconduct concerning children. This is something that experts interpret as highly unlikely and a serious sign of underreporting.
  • Twice Abandoned: How schools and child-welfare systems fail kids in foster care

    Foster kids graduate high school and go to college at a much lower rate than other groups of children. The federal government is trying to help these young people from falling behind, but many states aren’t doing their part. We look at how schools and child-welfare systems are each failing the foster youth in their care.
  • A Tangled Web of Lies – the Southeastern Military Academy

    An investigation into abuse allegations at a private school uncover a lack of oversight of private schools in Florida and a system failing students and parents.
  • The Ghosts of the Orphanage

    As many as 5 million children passed through America’s orphanages in the 20th century alone. In other countries, national investigations have exposed at least some of what transpired in such institutions. But the dark secrets of orphanage life in the US had lain buried, like the dead children who haunt survivors’ dreams — until BuzzFeed News published Christine Kenneally’s unforgettable investigation.
  • Accounting for Terror

    As terrorism shook the Western world in 2016, The Wall Street Journal investigated an area largely unexamined in the public furor over repeated attacks: the money trail. In a yearlong series, “Accounting for Terror,” a team of Journal reporters followed the money—in one case, literally. The stories illuminated an invisible foundation of ISIS and other terrorist groups: the economic engines that support their reign of murder and violence. The Journal obtained secret ISIS documents describing the terror group’s construction of a multinational oil operation obsessed with maximizing profits. It showed how some suspects in the Paris and Brussels terrorist attacks collected welfare benefits until just before they acted. And it detailed how an iconic American food producer of Butterball turkeys has done millions of dollars of business in Africa with a company blacklisted by U.S. authorities for supporting terrorism.
  • Failure to Protect series

    In a four-day series, The Daily Sentinel examined the killings of three children who were known to the local child-welfare system, as part of a broader examination of the child welfare and foster care systems in the county. The purpose was to inform the public about how the children ended up living with the people who ultimately killed them or were accused of killing them, the warning signs, the fallout that resulted from the deaths, and identify possible changes to the system that could prevent future killings.
  • Philly's Invisible Youth

    In a major multimedia investigation for Al Jazeera America, Laura Rena Murray writes about the alarming increase of homeless youth in Philadelphia and the utter failure of the child welfare agency and the emergency shelter system to care for them. By 2011, one in 20 of the city’s public high school students identified as having been homeless. Between 2009 and 2013, that percentage increased by 73 percent. There are many reasons youth end up on the streets. Most are trying to escape violent homes. http://projects.aljazeera.com/2015/12/homeless-youth/resources.html
  • The Brief Life and Private Death of Alexandria Hill

    Squeezed by high caseloads and tight budgets, child welfare agencies across the country are increasingly turning to for-profit companies and cash-strapped non-profit agencies to recruit, screen, train, and monitor foster parents. This little-known but common policy has resulted in child deaths across the country, in part because private agencies have a financial incentive to ignore the sketchy backgrounds of foster parents or festering problems in their homes.
  • China's Animal Activists

    In China, passion for animal welfare is driving a grassroots movement challenging economic interests and political authorities. In 2014 activists confronted the dog meat trade as never before, intercepting transports on the highways and attempting to stop an annual dog meat festival in the city of Yulin. Most acted out of a deep love for animals, which has awakened as pets have become increasingly popular among the middle class and the Buddhist value of compassion has reemerged after decades of disfavor. This article tells the story of several weeks during June of 2014 when a group of activists went to Yulin to challenge the festival.
  • IT WAS A HELL HOLE

    KARE 11 documented how eight special needs children were left to live in filth – at taxpayer’s expense – while local and state agencies ignored repeated warnings about their welfare. Our meticulous reporting and detailed follow-ups helped change state law, reform child protection practices, open two state investigations, and resulted in a criminal conviction. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kUYedyNjRTA