Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "wounded" ...

  • RMPBS "Insight with John Ferrugia" - "Imminent Danger"

    This project examines the issue of killings by mentally ill persons with access to guns. The story is told through the eyes of a mother whose mentally ill son murdered a sheriff’s deputy and wounded four others, and of the Sheriff whose deputy died. Both agree the confrontation could have been avoided if only state law allowed earlier intervention when a mentally ill person with access to guns is spinning out of control. Both did everything possible to head off the crisis, but had no legal tools to prevent it. The project also includes an exclusive interview with the parents of Aurora Theater killer James Holmes who explain they simply did not recognize the warning signs that their son was mentally ill and capable of homicide. They hold themselves responsible for their son’s mass murder.
  • California National Guard Bonus Enlistment Scandal

    Stories by the Los Angeles Times that described how the California National Guard was trying to recover millions of dollars in enlistment bonuses from nearly 10,000 soldiers and veterans – including some who had been wounded in combat – spurred the secretary of Defense to suspend the program, Congress to agree to waive most of the debts and the president to sign the bill into law.
  • Wounded Warriors

    CBS News investigates the Wounded Warrior Project, the nation’s largest and most well-known veterans charity, and reveals lavish spending of donor dollars, resulting in the dismissal of four of the charity’s top executives.
  • Mexico Violence

    The June 30 press release from the Mexican Defense Secretary stated that military personnel had discovered a warehouse filled with armed men who opened fire on the troops. Soldiers repelled the attack, 22 “presumed aggressors” died – and just one soldier was wounded. The experienced Mexico staff of The Associated Press doubted the official story: 22 dead on one side, zero on the other seemed unlikely in a firefight. Correspondent Mark Stevenson set out for the warehouse in a remote area of the state of Mexico known to be rife with drug traffickers, and discovered evidence of a massacre. This series details what the AP investigation uncovered.
  • Secret Casualties

    While American troops in Iraq never found an active weapons-of-mass-destruction program, they instead found — and greatly suffered from — long-abandoned chemical weapons. Nearly 5,000 old chemical warheads, shells or aviation bombs had been recovered; dozens of Americans and Iraqis were wounded by them. Yet, year after year, the Pentagon covered it up. Congress was misled, medical care was denied and soldiers were refused the honors and recognition they deserved for battlefield injuries.
  • Injured Heroes, Broken Promises

    This six-month-long investigation uncovered complaints from hundreds of injured, active duty soldiers who say they were mistreated, harassed and verbally abused by commanders of the U.S. Army’s Warrior Transition Units, or WTUs, which were created to improve care for injured soldiers after the 2007 Walter Reed scandal. Through interviews with wounded soldiers and hundreds of pages of Army records obtained in a Freedom of Information Act request, our reports showed how soldiers at three WTUs in Texas, particularly soldiers with mental wounds, were subjected to harsh treatment from unit leaders who were supposed to guide them through the healing process. Soldiers describe commanders using drill sergeant style threats, intimidation and demeaning language in an apparent attempt to motivate the injured. Video link: https://vimeo.com/116104924
  • Kill Anything That Moves

    Americans have long been taught that events such as the notorious My Lai massacre were isolated incidents in the Vietnam War, carried out by "a few bad apples." But as award‑winning journalist and historian Nick Turse demonstrates in this groundbreaking investigation, violence against Vietnamese noncombatants was not at all exceptional during the conflict. Rather, it was pervasive and systematic, the predictable consequence of orders to "kill anything that moves." Drawing on more than a decade of research in secret Pentagon files and extensive interviews with American veterans and Vietnamese survivors, Turse reveals for the first time how official policies resulted in millions of innocent civilians killed and wounded. In shocking detail, he lays out the workings of a military machine that made crimes in almost every major American combat unit all but inevitable. "Kill Anything That Moves" takes us from archives filled with Washington's long-suppressed war crime investigations to the rural Vietnamese hamlets that bore the brunt of the war; from boot camps where young American soldiers learned to hate all Vietnamese to bloodthirsty campaigns like Operation Speedy Express, in which a general obsessed with body counts led soldiers to commit what one participant called "a My Lai a month." Thousands of Vietnam books later, "Kill Anything That Moves," devastating and definitive, finally brings us face‑to‑face with the truth of a war that haunts Americans to this day.
  • Pay For The Triggerman: NBC 5 Investigates the Army’s Treatment of the Fort Hood Shooter and His Victims.

    Just hours after we aired the first story in this series it was flashed across the globe by news sites from the Huffington Post, to the Washington Times, and the London Daily Mail. In a matter of days several Congressmen worked to address what NBC 5 Investigates first reported: Major Nidal Hasan the man who shot and killed 13 U.S. soldiers and wounded another 32 at Fort Hood was still on the Army payroll and had received nearly $300,000 from U.S. taxpayers since his arrest. That did not sit well with victims of the attack still struggling to recover financially and emotionally. The Army had denied the victims pay and benefits awarded to other soldiers wounded at U.S. military bases overseas and in the 9/11 attack on the Pentagon. Over the next seven months our coverage continued in-depth over a series of eleven reports uncovering never-before-reported details about the Army’s treatment of the gunman and the victims. V.I.P. style helicopter rides for Hasan to help him work on his defense, his own private office created at Fort Hood, and millions spent on trial preparations during a process that dragged on for nearly four years.
  • Other Than Honorable

    An investigation that showed a surge in Army discharges for minor misconduct caused in part by the Army's inability to deal with wounded troops. The 3-part series prompted Congress to call for hearings and a GAO investigation, and changed federal law.
  • In the Line of Fire: Tough justice for bystanders hit by NYPD bullets

    When innocent bystanders were shot by New York police in front of the Empire State Building, many were surprised. Yet over the last two-plus decades, from 1990 to 2012, an examination of yearly police reports revealed that nearly 60 innocent bystanders were shot. Some were killed, while others suffered permanent injuries.These were people who were not mistakenly believed to be suspects, but simply innocent bystanders at the wrong place and wrong time. A CUNY News Service review, based on examining more than two decades of police reports, lawsuits, news accounts and interviews, shows that every year for the past 10 years at least one innocent bystander has been shot by the NYPD. Most of the time the victims are wounded. Some with permanent injuries. One bystander, a paraplegic teenager, was struck by a stray police bullet while sitting in his wheelchair. Further digging revealed the city makes no special effort to compensate victims -- indeed, the city in an untold number of cases fights making any compensation. The investigation shows that innocent bystanders who try to get city compensation have to file claims and lawsuits, and often face years of delay and mental anguish to go along with their physical pain. Payment vary greatly. The city often contests payments, and some victims get no money at all for their pains. Even victims in the same incident can get wildly different results -- in one case, one bystander got compensation, a second bystander who was severely wounded got no money. The majority of the shootings happen in the city’s poorer sections, particularly in northern Manhattan, from Harlem to Inwood. The shootings also happen mainly during daylight, underscoring questions about police training raised by victims.