Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

  • Great Lakes Today: Dangerous Waters

    This series explored a deadly issue that had not received any comprehensive media coverage: dangerous currents that cause hundreds of drownings and rescues on the Great Lakes. http://greatlakestoday.org/topic/special-4-part-series-drownings?_ga=1.267969550.1401490013.1472154646
  • Why Some Problem Cops Don’t Lose Their Badges

    A Wall Street Journal examination shows how states allow some police officers to remain on the force despite misconduct.
  • Second Chance City

    The District is the only place in nation with a law that gives leniency to young adult offenders who repeatedly commit violent crimes.
  • Lead Kids

    Decades before there was lead in drinking water in Flint, Michigan that poisoned kids, there was lead paint in homes. Some of those victims received life-time payouts for their injuries from landlords who failed to clean up the problem. And now some of those same lead kids, are being enticed to sell that future cash stream for pennies on the dollar. As a result of this investigation, CBS News found that some of the lead paint victims were defrauded by unscrupulous companies looking to make a profit. In their reporting, they found that these lead paint victims, as adults, had limited capacity to understand what they were signing away because of the irreversible brain damage caused by exposure to lead paint as kids.
  • Question of risk: Medtronic's lost study

    America depends on the timely notification of injuries to protect patients from dangerous medical devices. But as a Star Tribune investigation showed, companies can break injury-reporting laws with impunity. First, the newspaper exposed a long-lost Medtronic study of a controversial bone-surgery product called Infuse. The study documented more than 1,000 serious problems that were not provided to the government during a period of heightened scrutiny of the product’s safety. When Medtronic did report the data to the FDA, more than five years late, the FDA secretly granted Medtronic permission to summarize the data in a file that would be available to the public only under a FOIA request. The Star Tribune went on to document hundreds of these “retrospective summary reports” of long-overdue unreported device reports from two dozen companies.
  • Solitary: Way Down in the Hole

    This four-part series exposed, for the first time, Minnesota’s heavy use of solitary confinement. By building a database and through prisoner interviews, we found more than 1,600 examples of inmates spending six months or longer in isolation over the past 10 years, and 437 instances of prisoners serving one year or longer. We documented more than 24,000 cases of inmates spending longer than 15 days in solitary—the time frame the United Nations defines as human torture. The series also showed how inmates come to prison with pre-existing mental illnesses and end up in isolation only to deteriorate mentally. The final installment told of the difficult path for inmates once they leave isolation. In more than 700 cases in the past six years alone, offenders left prison directly from solitary confinement.
  • Troubling Pharmacies

    An investigation of nearly seven years of Virginia pharmacy board case decisions leads to the state making it easier for consumers to find out which health professionals are on probation but still working. It uncovers the area's largest health-provider, which had to outsource its hospital IV fluid mixing when it failed a pharmacy inspection, and got hospital officials to describe the details of the corrective action taken. It tells the story of a single pharmacist who never lost a day of work despite multiple probations from nearly 50 violations cited in board orders. It identifies the 17 area pharmacies that were cited for violations. And it reveals board reporting delays and transparency issues that keep consumers from making informed decisions on where to safely have their prescriptions filled.
  • WDSU Investigates: Parking Ticket Turmoil

    "WDSU Investigates: Parking Ticket Turmoil" is an in-depth six-month investigation into erroneously issued parking tickets by the city of New Orleans. WDSU’s investigation spurred a probe by the city’s Inspector General. In the months following, it was discovered that nearly 7,000 parking citations were improperly issued, potentially costing drivers hundreds of thousands of dollars in false payments.
  • Broken system fails abused animals in Dallas

    A FOX 4 Investigation uncovered that Dallas’s system to investigate animal cruelty is so broken, no one agency is tracking all animal cruelty cases from start to finish. Out of 4,000 animal cruelty calls received by Dallas in 2015, only 11 cases made it to the District Attorney for prosecution.
  • Profiting from Hunger

    Venezuela’s president handed the military complete control of the food supply last year after people took to the streets to protest severe shortages. But far from fighting hunger in the crisis-wracked country, the AP investigation found evidence of the military making millions from it through kickbacks and the sale of staples on the black market at dozens of times the government-set prices.