Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

  • KC Star: Stalk. Murder. Repeat.

    Robert J. Gross was a longtime serial murder suspect in Kansas City, implicated in at least four killings over five decades. But he had never been charged in any of them, even though police had been tracking him for years.
  • KARE 11 Investigates: “Double Billing the Badge – The Patrol Car Payback”

    “Double Billing the Badge – The Patrol Car Payback” exposed a complex scheme to overcharge hundreds of police agencies on thousands of squad cars. It has prompted a criminal conviction, reforms in state procurement policies, and a massive refund of taxpayer dollars.
  • KARE 11 Investigates: “A Pattern of Denial”

    KARE 11’s two-year investigation exposed a systemic nationwide pattern of veterans having their emergency medical bills improperly denied and often turned over to collection agencies. VA whistleblowers revealed to KARE that government quotas for processing claims – and a computer system that made it easier to deny claims than to approve them – were to blame for many denials. The improper denials could total billions of dollars.
  • Kaiser Health News: Unlocked and Loaded: Families Confront Guns and Dementia

    In the U.S., where gun violence kills 96 people each day, there has been vigorous debate about how to stop the carnage, including ways to prevent people with mental illness from acquiring and owning firearms. But an unacknowledged and potentially far bigger problem is what to do about the vast cache of firearms in the homes of aging Americans with dementia. Our four-month investigation, produced in partnership with PBS Newshour, shed new light on an aspect of guns and public health that no one talks about, even though it may affect millions of Americans.
  • Kaiser Health News and USA TODAY Network: Surgery Center deaths

    Millions of Americans are having routine surgeries performed at the nation’s 5,600-plus surgery centers, the small facilities that promise to get you in and out quickly, and at a much lower cost. But some of those facilities lack the staff or training to handle emergencies, and have been taking on increasingly fragile patients. It’s a dangerous situation that has put patients’ lives at risk and even children’s lives at risk, a groundbreaking investigation by Kaiser Health News and USA Today Network discovered. Hundreds of patients, some as young as two, have died after having surgeries as simple as tonsillectomies or colonoscopies. And at least 7,000 patients a year had to be raced by ambulance to a local hospital when something went wrong.
  • Justice for Colten

    Colten Boushie, a 22-year old Cree youth was shot in the head by Saskatchewan farmer Gerald Stanley. That is undisputed. So, why the not-guilty verdict? That decision sparked protests across the country and brought race relations in Canada into sharp focus with some Indigenous people seeing a justice system steeped in colonialism and white supremacy.
  • Just a Game?

    Fans of the National Football League cannot ignore the growing body of evidence revealing that the game is hurting – and perhaps killing – many of the men who play it. In a series of reports, KING 5 put a laser focus on Seattle’s hometown team, to show fans the devastating impacts on former Seahawks players. The two-year project included player surveys, interviews and documentation that exposed the challenges faced by Seahawks in their football afterlives.
  • IRW: The Boy on the Bus

    The Investigative Reporting Workshop found deep cracks in the registry system for sex offenders that allow predators to move, skip registration, and begin new lives under the radar in a new neighborhood — unless they are arrested again. The story was published with IowaWatch.
  • Investigation to Resignation to Plea Deal

    The press secretary for Houston's mayor hid thousands of emails from the media after a records request. Those emails would show she was spending significant amounts of time pitching reality shows to Hollywood producers while on the clock for the city of Houston. That decision was exposed and led to her eventual arrest: a major message to public officials that violations of the open records act can lead to criminal charges.
  • Investigating Gun Tracing

    Investigative Units from NBC Bay Area and NBC10 Philadelphia combined forces to uncover flaws in the way federal, state and local agents trace firearms through a technology meant to connect crimes through ballistics testing. While the technology is promising the team discovered, for the first time, that political infighting and sometimes simple bureaucratic inertia prevented the technology from even being consistently used, leaving some communities vulnerable to gun violence that could otherwise have been prevented.