Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

  • Inside the Secret Courts

    "Secret Courts" exposed the darkest corner of the Massachusetts criminal justice system. Criminal cases, including felony charges of vehicle homicide and rape, are held in closed-door hearings -- often in private offices without public notice -- and the outcome is up to the discretion of a single court official who may not have a law degree. No other state has anything like it.
  • Fall From Grace: How Buffalo's Bishop Hid Sexual Abuse in the Catholic Diocese of Buffalo

    Damning documents from a confidential source were the basis for our three-part series on Bishop Richard J. Malone, which showed that Malone returned an accused child abuser to ministry after a previous bishop removed him; allowed another abusive priest to remain pastor of a wealthy parish despite multiple abuse allegations; and deceived the faithful by hiding the "real" abuse list -- containing more than 100 priests -- from the public.
  • Forcing the Peace

    WCPO's I-Team investigated police use of force involving officers at 32 local police departments. Our investigation uncovered excessive force, unreported use of force and identified the police officer who punched more people in the face than any other local cop. We also revealed black children were more likely than adults to be tased by police.
  • Back of the Class

    The multi-part investigation "Back of the Class" exposed that Washington state lags behind much of the country in its decades-old, outdated special education policies and program, leaving thousands of students with special needs without their federally mandated right to a free and appropriate education.
  • Heartbroken

    Heart surgery patients at the prestigious Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital in St. Petersburg died at a stunning rate, despite warnings that the procedures were putting kids at risk.
  • Fatal Flaws

    Kentucky's worker safety program failed to properly investigate nearly every on-the-job death for two years. The victims were tree trimmers, public-works employees, construction workers, home health aides. They died in jobs everyone knows to be dangerous and in jobs you might attend every day without considering whether you'd make it home. But in almost every case, the state's Occupational Safety and Health program didn't do enough to determine if a business was responsible for unsafe conditions — never mind actually hold them accountable.
  • Parkland

    The South Florida Sun Sentinel dug deep to expose the cascade of errors that preceded and followed the school shooting at Parkland and cost children their lives.
  • California Prosecution Fees

    The Desert Sun uncovered how residents of three cities in the Coachella Valley were being billed massive fees that paid for private attorneys the city had contracted to go after the residents' for minor city code violations. Petty offenses, like having a messy yard or hanging a Halloween decoration on a street light, led to thousands or tens of thousands of dollars being demanded of the residents. If they couldn't pay, liens were assessed. Following the reporting, the cities stopped the practice, state lawmakers made it illegal in California and a class-action lawsuit led to at least one city refunding the residents.
  • Denied Justice

    “Denied Justice” exposed widespread failings in how Minnesota’s criminal justice system investigated and prosecuted sexual assault cases, depriving victims of justice, endangering the public and allowing rapists to go unpunished.
  • Toxic City: Sick Schools

    Children in Philadelphia public schools endure environmental hazards -- deteriorated asbestos, damaged lead paint, festering mold and rodent droppings -- that deprive them of a healthy place to learn and thrive. In reaching our major findings, we conducted 175 scientific tests at 19 elementary schools at a cost of nearly $9,000, built a custom database to analyze more than 250,000 room-by-room environmental records, and interviewed more than 120 teachers, parents, students and experts.