Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

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    Gannett News Service issues reprint on politics of selection process for federal judiciary.
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    Pottsville (Pa.) Republican publishes thorough investigation of the bankruptcy of the Blue Coal Company; liquidation of company was planned from beginning by the company that purchased it as a way of manufacturing a coal shortage and driving up prices; Blue Coal dumped employee black lung disease claims on state.
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    Pittsburgh Press series offers some background on the numbers racket and police attempts to crack it.
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    Akron Beacon Journal runs series, titled "The Untouchables," on the power and abuse of power by Ohio's sheriffs.
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    ARTnews traces how a 27-year-old art dealer succeeded in bilking clients out of millions of dollars through art fraud.
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    The Record (Hackensack, N.J.) investigation of a small railroad finds its owner's dealings brought him a hefty profit while bankrupting the railroad.
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    San Jose Mercury News article describes the dangers of contracting AIDS through donated blood; tells what blood banks are doing and what they should be doing to test for AIDS in donors' blood.
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    The Record (Hackensack, N.J.) publishes article on fraud scheme that won large loans from two New Jersey banks by using certificates of deposit from a front bank chartered in St. Vincent.
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    The Record (Hackensack, N.J.) tests real estate agents for discrimination and finds blacks are shown fewer homes in fewer neighborhoods, etc. (Supplement: report on federal efforts to end discrimination in housing.)
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    In These Times article finds decay of earth's ozone layer could lead to catastrophe; government officials and scientists agree extreme solutions are necessary.