Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

  • America’s Chernobyl?: Inside the Most Toxic Place in the Nation

    In the course of a six-month investigation, the NBC News Investigative Unit discovered that numerous workers are sick and some have died at a Department of Energy nuclear site, and documented allegations from workers that the US government is covering up the danger. Their report on NBC’s Today Show prompted legislative action and raised larger questions about the ability of the federal government to store some of its most dangerous waste.
  • Sick and Imprisoned

    This entry chronicles an investigation into the healthcare of inmates at the Hampton Roads Regional Jail, including the treatment of the mentally ill. It starts with the death of Henry Stewart, who was vomiting blood and begging for help from officials in the days before he died. The investigation goes on to detail how the jail treated inmates such as Jamycheal Mitchell, who died a year before Stewart, as well as the larger problems with how Virginia cares for the incarcerated and mentally ill.
  • Trump's Doctor

    Everybody was talking about Donald Trump’s doctor's note about the candidate's health, which included typos and language like "laboratory test results were astonishingly excellent" and "his physical strength and stamina are extraordinary." But who was the character behind this bizarre letter? In a story that broke news and broke the internet, NBC News revealed that Dr. Harold Bornstein wrote the letter in five minutes with Trump's limo waiting outside his office.
  • The Education of Edwin Raymond

    For a cover story in the New York Times Magazine, Investigative Fund reporter Saki Knafo uses exclusive, secretly recorded audio from one officer, Edwin Raymond, to expose the NYPD’s rigid insistence on fulfilling arrest quotas — and the racial biases behind them — despite public denials that such a quota system exists. The story sparked a follow-up investigation by NBC New York and coverage by several other outlets. Ultimately, the story resulted in the promotion of the whistleblowing officer.
  • Out Here, No One Can Hear You Scream

    Kathryn Joyce’s expose of sexual harassment, assault and gender discrimination in the National Park Service and Forest Service broke the news of the perpetrators' identities, led to the resignation of the Grand Canyon superintendent amid a harassment probe, and helped spark House hearings to examine the scandal.
  • Dying in Private Prisons

    This harrowing investigative series into America’s shadow system of privatized federal prisons for The Nation magazine and The Investigative Fund exposed deadly medical neglect and failed government oversight, and led to a major announcement by the Department of Justice in August ordering the Bureau of Prisons to end its use of private prison operators.
  • 'Not Wanted': Racial Bias at Trump Properties

    In the weeks leading up to the presidential election, the NBC News Investigative Unit and MSNBC broadcast an in-depth report on the Trump family business’s racist practices in the 1960's through the early 1980's, when African-Americans seeking to rent apartments in New York City were turned away because of the color of their skin.
  • Edward Snowden's Guardian Angels

    On June 9, 2013, when Edward Snowden chose Hong Kong as the place where to reveal the massive civil rights abuses by the American intelligence services, he forgot one thing: where to go next. Still, he managed to escape the American agents, the Hong Kong Police and all journalists who were chasing him. This article reveals for the first time how Snowden managed to stay hidden in Hong Kong for two weeks before leaving for Moscow. And it introduces the people who helped him.
  • The Mail Fraud Mafia

    In CNNMoney’s initial five-part investigation, they took readers along on our journey each week as they peeled back the layers of one of the world’s longest-running scams and ultimately exposed the global network that has kept it alive for decades. Even international investigators had been stumped. They had been unable to shut the scheme down and were not even sure whether the French psychic Maria Duval, who was the face and name of the scam, was a real person. But after months of reporting, CNN managed to zero in on the scam’s original masterminds, untangle the complicated and shadowy business web that has kept the scheme alive, and tell the unexpected story of psychic herself -- providing a rare window into how this massive fraud has been able to go on for so long. And in their second installment, they exposed a little-known Canadian company named PacNet, which has made schemes like this possible. By cashing the checks sent in by countless victims -- not just for the Maria Duval scheme, but for dozens of heartless scams that have preyed on the elderly for decades -- this tiny payment processor had been quietly profiting from global fraud for years. In this world, con artists perpetrate the fraud. PacNet deposits the checks. Not only did this series document just how many scams PacNet had processed payments for, but it also detailed the close-knit network of global scammers that specifically prey on the elderly, and the companies that help them do it.
  • UA president attempts takeover of for-profit chain ITT Tech

    After nearly a year of reporting on University of Akron President Scott Scarborough, The Devil Strip learned he was negotiating with a for-profit education company for what they suspected was a curriculum deal. Instead, they discovered that company was brokering a deal for the university to take over ITT Tech. The small paper broke this story, which was echoed by several outlets who were shut out of the university. They, meanwhile, had Scarborough on the phone admitting to the negotiations. While the school locked down the information, Sen. Dick Durbin referenced their reporting in an address to President Obama, promising to keep an eye on UA. Soon afterwards, the university abandoned the efforts, Scarborough was removed from office and ITT Tech closed all its campuses.