Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

  • The Digilantes Try to Find Out Who Is Behind Mugshot.com

    The Digilantes uncovered a multi-million dollar extortion-based industry that’s wreaking havoc upon tens of millions of Americans’ lives, especially minorities. It’s the business of mugshot websites. Operators of these sites scrape public arrest records from online police databases, put them on their own websites, making them easily searchable on Google, and then charge hundreds of dollars to remove them, whether you are guilty or not. These mugshots, which can live forever online, are a form of digital scarlet letter ruining people's’ reputations, job and housing opportunities, even their dating lives. http://fusion.net/story/252451/digilantes-mugshots-dotcom-investigation/
  • Hell and High Water

    The Houston area is home to 6.5 million people, as well as America’s largest oil refining and petrochemical complex. And it’s a sitting duck for the extreme storms and floods that will become more common as the effects of climate change become more pronounced. So why isn’t Texas — or the federal government — doing more to protect it?
  • Teen to Terrorist

    KSTP's exclusive interview with a convicted terrorist who was a former ISIS recruit and one of the most high profile terrorist defendants in the federal government's most significant and largest terror recruiting case in the country gave them unprecedented insight into how and why ISIS is successfully recruiting young Somali-American men.
  • Presumed Innocent, Found Dead - Tracking Jail Deaths Since Sandra Bland

    A team of HuffPost reporters and data journalists created a first-of-its-kind database of more than 800 jail deaths in the U.S., identified problem jails and produced months of follow-ups, including a feature-length investigation that revealed that many jail suicides are preventable and occur in the first 72 hours after booking.
  • Conviction

    “Conviction” is a digital documentary series, the first of its kind from NBC News, that helped free an innocent man, Richard Rosario, who spent 20 years in prison for a murder he didn’t commit. Rosario was released the day after the series was posted online.
  • Fatal Experiments

    Paolo Macchiarini has long been hailed as both a superstar surgeon and a revolutionizing researcher in the world of regenerative medicine. When he performed the world's first transplantation of a synthetic trachea seeded with stem cells in 2011, it seemed that modern medicine was one step closer to "the artificial man," where human organs could be produced in laboratories. But when the patients soon started dying, serious allegations of research fraud started to emerge against Macchiarini and his methods. At the same time, his operations were investigated by the police for suspected manslaughter. But Macchiarini was backed by the prestigious Karolinska Institute (home of the Nobel prize), which found that all in all he had done nothing wrong. Paolo seemed to be free of the accusations, that is until he let a team of investigative reporters into his world of the academic elite.
  • Lead Poisoning in Erie County and Buffalo

    Buffalo’s lead poisoning problem due to old housing stock and water utilities is getting out of hand. Investigative Post found that both the Erie County Water Authority and the Buffalo Water Board cut corners in their lead sampling programs for drinking water.
  • Who’s getting rich off your student debt?

    The student loan program was supposed to help open the door to higher education, but it’s become something else: a profit center for Wall Street and the government. Now the program is making things worse for some of the people it was designed to help. This episode of Reveal explores how this happened and who’s winning and losing as a result.
  • San Diego's waterfront

    inewsource's investigation uncovered the back-room deals and power politics that shaped some of the most valuable — and public — waterfront land in southern California. With two long-form stories told through every medium possible — text, photo, video, audio, graphics, maps and social media — inewsource helped prevent the same deviant process from occurring again in a neighboring (and equally valuable) plot of land currently under development. The series also helped kickstart mitigation efforts to make part of the original land more publicly accessible. The first story was told using inewsource’s unique transparency technique of providing an interactive text version of the story, allowing readers to view the documentation behind nearly every sentence for themselves using DocumentCloud.
  • Hollow Columns

    At least 22 highway bridges in Washington state sit on hollow concrete columns that are at risk of instantaneous implosion in a major earthquake. The state doesn’t know how to fix them. In addition, the state knows of 474 bridges that are at risk of crumbling in a big quake. The state has insufficient funds to fix them. Highways that are part of the Puget Sound region’s “seismic lifeline” emergency aid routes were found by KUOW to contain dozens of seismically vulnerable bridges. The state does not publish the totality of its infrastructure needs, in contrast to its seismic cousin California. Until KUOW published a map showing the locations of the endangered bridges, no such public information was available.