Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

  • Vermont Ski Resort Developers Accused of Misusing $200M in ‘Ponzi-like‘ Scheme

    VTDigger began exposing allegations of fraud at a ski resort in northern Vermont two years before the Securities and Exchange Commission brought charges last April against the developers in what is now the largest EB-5 immigrant investor fraud case in the nation’s history. After the story broke, we investigated how the state of Vermont failed to protect investors.
  • Suffering in Secret

    Illinois steered thousands of its poorest and most vulnerable adults with disabilities into less expensive private group homes and cloaked harm and death with secrecy and silence. The Tribune exposed flawed investigations (two cases were reopened) and revealed how Illinois had publicly undercounted abuse and neglect cases for five years. The Tribune identified 1,311 cases of harm since July 2011 and tracked at least 42 deaths in group homes or their day programs over the last seven years. Additionally, the Tribune uncovered a secretive state practice that allowed group home employees to police their own businesses. The Tribune also detailed a state auction in which group home executives raised hands to select individuals with disabilities to be moved from state facilities into the community. For the first time, the Tribune circumvented state secrecy to show that many group homes were underfunded, understaffed and dangerously unprepared for new arrivals with complex needs.
  • Verizon: Fighting Data Overages

    Many Verizon Wireless customers are being billed for unexplained data overuse. In September, The Plain Dealer wrote about a few people who questioned exorbitant charges. Those stories quickly led to 4,000 Verizon customers from around the country contacting the paper with similar concerns. The reporters have stayed on the story, trying to determine what is wrong. All the while, Verizon says there is no widespread problem with its billing software -- while often erasing the charges that customers complain about.
  • Vaccine Glass

    Vaccine maker Sanofi Pasteur discovered tiny pieces of glass in batches of a vaccine intended for babies. But Sanofi did not issue a recall. Rather, it allowed doctors and nurses throughout the country to continue injecting babies with glass for another year and a half.
  • The Genetic Testing Gold Rush

    With billions of dollars to be made and inadequate regulation, the exploding genetic testing industry is a veritable wild west, ripe for fraud. In this six-month investigation broadcast on CBS This Morning and CBS Evening News we sought to expose the charlatans and con men exploiting the industry’s exponential growth—and patients’ trust—for profit.
  • The Traffickers: The Girl in the Window

    The Traffickers is an investigative documentary series which traces the global trafficking routes of some of the world’s most sought after commodities: Gold, exotic animals, sex, even human body parts - anything can be bought for a price. The aim was ambitious - to give an exclusive guide to the global black market world, with high production values, excellent cinematography, dynamic story-telling and outstanding journalism. The series is presented by Nelufar Hedayat, who herself was trafficked as a child refugee from war-torn Afghanistan. During the course of filming, Nelufar visited 22 different countries, criss-crossing the world to follow the story. The Dark Side of Adoption reveals how American couples adopting babies from the DRC can be caught up in an adoption scam which hoodwinks unsuspecting parents into giving up their children.
  • Exploited in Paradise

    Hundreds of foreign fishermen without visas are confined to American boats for years at a time in Hawaii, due to a federal loophole that allows them to work but exempts them from most basic labor protections.
  • How Despots Use Twitter to Hunt Dissidents

    Ben Elgin and Peter Robison showed how Twitter, while cultivating an image as a protector of civil liberties, has in fact been selling its so-called Firehose of metadata to companies that repackage it for analysis by police and security agencies across the globe.
  • Veterans Deserve Better

    While veterans in Northeast Tennessee and Southwest Virginia endured some of the longest wait times in the nation, a nearly yearlong review of federal disciplinary records revealed Mountain Home VA Medical Center employees abused, disrespected and refused to help some patients and some kept their jobs.
  • The death of Korryn Gaines

    These stories explored the death of Korryn Gaines after a six-hour standoff with Baltimore County police. Baltimore Sun reporters were able to shed light on the incident with stories about Gaines’ past encounters with police and social media postings, an exclusive interview with the neighbor who allowed police to drill holes in the wall he shared with Gaines’ apartment so they could monitor her movements, and another exclusive on court documents showing that police sought Gaines’ private Facebook messages and other account information. Reporters also explored other angles, such as the role social media is playing in encounters with police across the country. Finally, reporters gained exclusive access to the investigative file that provided a trove of information on how the standoff went down.