Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

  • L.A. Times: In the Search for Drugs, a Lopsided Dragnet

    Since 2012, deputies in a specialized narcotics unit of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department have pulled over thousands of cars on a rural stretch of the 5 Freeway, California’s major north-south artery. A Times analysis of the unit’s traffic stops found Latino drivers are stopped and searched far more frequently than other motorists – a disparity that translated into thousands of innocent people being detained by deputies acting on little more than a hunch. In several cases, federal judges ruled deputies violated people’s constitutional rights. In response to The Times’ investigation, the Sheriff’s Department recently suspended the unit’s operations.
  • L.A. Times: How California Law Shielded Dishonest Cops

    For decades, California’s strict police privacy laws made it nearly impossible for anyone to find out basic information about police officer misconduct. A team of Los Angeles Times reporters spent months investigating the impact of this secrecy on the criminal justice system. They found that officers caught for dishonesty and other serious wrongdoing were able to continue testifying in court without prosecutors, defendants, judges and jurors ever finding out about their past. Countless defendants were convicted based on the testimony of these officers. Published at the height of a political debate over making police records public, the stories helped galvanize support to change state law and open up some records about officer misconduct, which had been kept confidential for 40 years.
  • L.A. Times: Gaming the System: How Cops and Firefighters Cashed In on L.A.’s Pension Program

    More than a thousand aging first responders joined a highly unusual retirement program and then took extended leaves – hundreds were out longer than a year – at twice their usual pay.
  • L.A. Times: Danger Spins From the Sky

    Robinson Helicopter Co., the world’s leading maker of civilian helicopters, is an American aviation success story – with a deadly 45-year history. The Los Angeles Times provided the first comprehensive examination of the company’s safety record, and the design features and flight characteristics that have dogged Robinson helicopters for decades.
  • KyCIR: Despite Calls For Help, Bedbugs Infest Louisville Public Housing Complex

    Residents of a high-rise public housing complex for the elderly complained for years about the bedbugs. It was a relentless infestation that the housing authority paid little attention to, and the city’s code enforcement officers insisted they weren’t responsible for. Jacob Ryan used data and interviews with residents to show that the issue was pervasive -- and ignored.
  • KyCIR: A Louisville Family Reported Sexual Abuse By A Coach. He Worked With Kids For 15 More Years

    When he was 17 years old, Eric Flynn confided to his parents that his coach, Drew Conliffe, had sexually abused him dozens of times over a period of at least two years. Conliffe and his father, a former elected county attorney, paid the family for years for their silence. He apparently escaped serious consequences, despite two police investigations, even though dozens of people and several Louisville institutions knew about the allegation. In the wake of our investigation, several more alleged victims came forward.
  • KXAN: DENIED

    Texas law gives police discretion to withhold information when suspects die in custody. Legislative efforts to close that loophole have failed, but it has not stopped the families who have been denied video and other records detailing their loved ones' final moments from speaking out. A KXAN investigation sheds light on this statewide need for police accountability, transparency and trust.
  • KUOW: 11 women accuse Seattle entrepreneur David Meinert of sexual misconduct

    A six-month investigation of multiple allegations of sexual assault and misconduct against a well-known Seattle businessman and politico yields 11 accusers over two decades. After an initial story broke describing the allegations of five anonymous women, six more women came forward – and were willing to use their names.
  • KPCC: Repeat

    KPCC’s “Repeat” is a serialized podcast that shows how one of the largest law enforcement agencies in the country, the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, investigates officers who shoot civilians. We found a system that is largely shielded from public scrutiny and raised questions about the secrecy of internal investigations.
  • KPCC: Homeless Shelters

    L.A. has the largest population of unsheltered homeless people in the country. Local officials are looking to massively expand shelter space--but KPCC found thousands of existing beds sit empty each night. Why? Our investigation turned up troubling safety and sanitation issues in shelters, as well as a regulatory system ill-equipped to make improvements, let alone manage a successful shelter expansion.