Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "African-Americans" ...

  • Policing in America: Five Years after Ferguson

    CBS News’ “Policing in America: Five Years After Ferguson” is a first-of-its-kind investigation into changes that police departments across America say they're making regarding race and policing since the shooting death of Michael Brown and subsequent protests and unrest in Ferguson, Missouri five years ago.
  • Role of Obama-era school discipline policies in Parkland massacre

    Most news media neglected a huge part of the Parkland school massacre. They did so by focusing largely on the roles played by gun laws and mental illness in Nikolas Cruz’s rampage. Paul Sperry went against the grain, in a series of reports for RealClearInvestigations that exposed a central factor in the horror: an Obama-era push that made school discipline more lenient across the country because of concerns that minority students, especially African-Americans, were being disciplined at much higher rates than other Americans. Sperry was the first to report, and to comprehensively detail, this broad and ultimately misguided effort to end the “school to prison pipeline.”
  • 'Not Wanted': Racial Bias at Trump Properties

    In the weeks leading up to the presidential election, the NBC News Investigative Unit and MSNBC broadcast an in-depth report on the Trump family business’s racist practices in the 1960's through the early 1980's, when African-Americans seeking to rent apartments in New York City were turned away because of the color of their skin.
  • The death of Freddie Gray

    The April death of a West Baltimore man in police custody quickly spiraled into a controversy that left some city neighborhoods in flames, and brought attention from national and international media. Within days, the name Freddie Gray became associated with the broader debate over the way police across the nation treated African-Americans. Central to that debate was a singular question: How did Gray die? The Baltimore Sun set out to provide an answer by investigating allegations of police brutality and dissecting the crucial minutes after Gray was arrested. Reporters revealed that Gray was not the first person to be seriously injured in a police transport van, and that officers routinely ignored calls by detainees for medical care. http://data.baltimoresun.com/news/police-convictions/ http://data.baltimoresun.com/news/intake-logs/rejections/ http://data.baltimoresun.com/freddie-gray/
  • Empty-desk epidemic

    For years, Chicago officials published upbeat statistics that masked a crisis in the city's schools: Nearly 32,000 of the city's K-8 grade students — or roughly 1 in 8 —miss a month or more of class per year, while others simply vanish from school without a trace. This devastating pattern of absenteeism, which disproportionately affects African-Americans and children with disabilities, came to light only after Chicago Tribune reporters dug it out during a years-long FOIA battle to obtain internal district data.
  • Critical Condition

    This investigation shows that the quality of care received by black seniors' is lower than that of white seniors. Illinois has the highest number of poorly rated black nursing homes in the U.S. Chicago's nursing homes that serve predominantly white seniors were all rated excellent by the federal government whereas none of those serving mostly blacks received that rating. Poverty was not linked to these low rankings. In the new analysis, they found significant racial disparities throughout the country between majority-black and majority-white homes.
  • The Strong Arm of the Law

    Flaws in the Seattle Police Department's approach to officer violence were revealed in this series. African-Americans were arrested eight times more than whites for the crime of obstructing an officer.
  • Crackpot Crackdown

    Police and the DA in Jackson County, Texas, ran a series of drug busts for minor infractions. All of the suspects were African-Americans and were intimidated into pleading guilty rather than face much harsher sentences. The entire sting operation was based on the testimony of a single confidential police informant. Civil rights lawyers are now involved in trying to remedy some of the most flagrant miscarriages of justice.
  • Striking Differences

    This team of reporters spent two years gathering and analyzing jury data from felony court trials to see if racial discrimination still played a key role in jury selection. The investigation found that prosecutors tend to reject African-American jurors, while defense attorneys tended to retain them. Consequently, the number of African-Americans serving on juries in Dallas more or less mirrored the breakdown of the population.
  • Making Elections Fair to Minorities; Euclid, where blacks have never won an election

    Reporters with The Record performed an independent analysis of one community's election process, only to discover "some level of racially polarized voting in four of five elections. The analysis shows that, in a community that is made up of 29% African-Americans and 56.8% whites, making the elections unfair and unbalanced. As a result, the election process made it more difficult for all members of the community to be fairly represented. As a result of this, the community of Teaneck was under investigation of the Justice Department.