Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Canada" ...

  • National Observer: First Nations and the Trans Mountain Pipeline

    National Observer’s reporting revealed how the Canadian government made a politically-motivated decision to approve a major west-coast pipeline expansion project, knowingly violating its legal duty to consult affected Indigenous communities. The reporting has contributed to significant delays in the project, followed by the withdrawal of energy company Kinder Morgan, and a government takeover of the project. The reporting has largely left the project in limbo, and will force federal officials to improve its efforts to accommodate First Nations if it wants to proceed with the pipeline expansion. Meanwhile, a key federal cabinet minister has been reassigned and oil companies have scaled back plans to expand production in Alberta either directly or indirectly related to the investigation by National Observer.
  • LAST RESORT

    It was a difficult journey through the past for two men who were sent to a behaviour modification camp as young offenders in the 1970s. In fall 2018, Richard Yarema and Guy Dumas returned with APTN Investigates’ reporter Christopher Read to the fly-in facility operated by the Ranch Erhlo Society in northern Saskatchewan. The story chronicles the brief and violent history of “wilderness challenge” camps where the majority of campers were Indigenous.
  • Justice for Colten

    Colten Boushie, a 22-year old Cree youth was shot in the head by Saskatchewan farmer Gerald Stanley. That is undisputed. So, why the not-guilty verdict? That decision sparked protests across the country and brought race relations in Canada into sharp focus with some Indigenous people seeing a justice system steeped in colonialism and white supremacy.
  • Global News/Toronto Star: Dispensing Harm

    After months of data analysis, a collaboration of Canadian journalists exposed drug-dealing pharmacists who abuse their professional privileges for personal profit. These rogue pharmacists traffic large quantities of prescription drugs, providing a supply line of illicit drugs to the street and contributing to the deadly opioid epidemic. The investigation also found that the government has the tools to crack down on this criminal behavior, but isn't using them.
  • Fatal Fun: How Atlantic Canadians are dying on recreational vehicles

    Fatal Fun examined the dangerous side of one of the most popular pastimes in rural Canada, revealing gaps in the law and prompting some provincial governments to review the rules that govern recreational vehicles.
  • CBC Radio: #MeToo in Medicine

    The #MeToo in Medicine breaks the code of silence in healthcare to expose the hierarchical culture of medicine which allows for those in senior positions to sexually harass and abuse their junior colleagues. The story profiles two physicians who speak out for the first time about how they were sexually harassed on the job by their superiors.
  • CBC News - Missing and Murdered: Finding Cleo

    This submission is for a podcast with ten episodes. The submission includes the episodes, an audio trailer as well as a link to the podcast website where you can find other material such as photos and video and text stories and uploaded files of the episode transcripts (as supplementary material) On the surface, this is a true crime story trying to answer the question - what happened to Cleo Semaganis Nicotine? She and her siblings in the Cree Indigenous family were taken into government care in Saskatchewan, Canada in the 1970's and adopted into white families in Canada and the United States. The siblings re-connected as adults but can't find Cleo. They've heard that she ran away from a home in Arkansas and was murdered but they don't know if that is true. They want help to at least find where she is buried.
  • Canada's role in innocent man's imprisonment

    This investigative report on the extradition of Hassan Diab to France revealed for the first time the secret efforts Canadian officials went to in order to send an innocent man to a French prison. Diab would spend more than 3 years in near-solitary confinement while he was investigated for a bombing outside a Paris synagogue. Canada went to great lengths to extradite Diab despite warnings that the French case was extremely weak. The French case ultimately fell apart due to flimsy evidence.
  • The Catch

    "The Catch" is documentary investigation that found Canada may be complicit in violating international law because the country’s navy and air force assists the U.S. Coast Guard to police international waters and capture suspected drug smugglers, some of whom have reported mistreatment on board U.S. Coast Guard vessels.
  • Rail Crossings Danger

    A CBC News investigation into Canada's top 25 most accident-prone railway crossings found wide-spread design flaws across the country. Some of the most dangerous railway crossings in Canada lack automated gate arms, protective pedestrian gates, advance warning signs, bells and flashing lights. Other deficiencies include poor sightlines for drivers, confusing road signs and overgrown bush. As well, CBC News learned Transport Canada does not routinely warn the public about all railway crossings that appear in its database of the country's 500 "highest risk" crossings.