Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "China" ...

  • Asylum Crackdown

    In her investigation “Chinatown Asylum Crackdown,” NPR’s Ailsa Chang shines a light on a never-before reported aspect of the Trump administration’s clampdown on the asylum system. Much of the news coverage on President Trump’s immigration policies has been focused on the White House’s efforts to turn away asylum-seekers at the border. What Chang reveals in her investigation for NPR’s Planet Money podcast is the Trump administration’s quiet operation to strip asylum status from immigrants who won it years ago. The people targeted in this sweeping review are Chinese immigrants – more than 13,000 of them. Many of them have been living in the U.S. for years with green cards and are now spending thousands of dollars defending their asylum cases in immigration court – years after winning asylum.
  • AP: China Clamps Down

    This AP series revealed the extent of China’s suppression of largely Muslim ethnic groups in a remote region and how it fits into a growing clampdown on individual freedom and privacy across the country.
  • ABC's 20/20: What Really Killed Prince

    ABC's 20/20 travels across the country and to China investigating fentanyl, the drug that killed Prince and has been linked to thousands of deaths in the U.S.
  • 50 Years since the Chinese Cultural Revolution and North Korea: Does the Hydrogen Bomb Test Signal the North Korean Version of the Cultural Revolution?

    North Korea ran a hydrogen bomb test in January, 2016. Some think this signaled the start of Kim Jong-Un’s version of the Cultural Revolution because China’s Cultural Revolution began around the time of their nuclear bomb test in 1964 and their hydrogen bomb test in 1966. The Chinese Cultural Revolution was a sort of power struggle by Mao Zedong where he used the power of the public to get rid of his opponents within the Communist Party and climb back to the top over a period of 10 years starting in 1966. Chinese society ended up with deep scars from hatred and vengeance because of it. For the 50th year anniversary of the Chinese Cultural Revolution, we explore the current state of North Korea’s Kim Jong-Un’s regime, which is carrying out deep-rooted idolization tactics internally while running nuclear weapons and missile tests externally, and try to predict the future of North Korea.
  • China's Animal Activists

    In China, passion for animal welfare is driving a grassroots movement challenging economic interests and political authorities. In 2014 activists confronted the dog meat trade as never before, intercepting transports on the highways and attempting to stop an annual dog meat festival in the city of Yulin. Most acted out of a deep love for animals, which has awakened as pets have become increasingly popular among the middle class and the Buddhist value of compassion has reemerged after decades of disfavor. This article tells the story of several weeks during June of 2014 when a group of activists went to Yulin to challenge the festival.
  • Hanergy - behind the empire of China’s richest man

    This investigation into suspicious trading in one of the most highly-valued yet mysterious companies on the Hong Kong stock exchange combined innovative software-driven analysis and exclusive forensic reporting to explore apparent market manipulation at Hanergy, the Chinese solar giant. After the FT’s stories, Hanergy shares crashed to earth, pre-empting the broader plunge in Chinese equities and highlighting concerns over the true financial state of some of the new Chinese companies that have rocketed to prominence in the last few years.
  • Rare Earth Elements

    The U.S. began the march toward the use of rare Earth metals - essential ingredients in everything from smart phones and computers to cars and missiles - but has left most of their mining and processing to others. China now dominates this crucial industry, which worries the U.S. government.
  • Golf's secret boom in Hainan, China

    The first-ever story about the largest golf-related development in world history, a massive multi-billion-dollar project that occupies a piece of land nearly 1.5 times the size of Manhattan.
  • Lumber Liquidators

    After a seven-month investigation, 60 MINUTES found that Chinese-made laminate flooring sold in Lumber Liquidator outlets across the country contains amounts of toxic formaldehyde that may not meet health and safety standards. http://youtu.be/f-i8PmX_f4k http://www.cbsnews.com/videos/lumber-liquidators-update-2/
  • The Long Arm of China

    A global team exposes China’s clandestine efforts to export propaganda, shape world opinion and assert political control in the heart of Western democracies.