Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Democrats" ...

  • Bogus Ballots

    Our investigation uncovered what one legal expert deemed “systematized voter deception” at play during the October 3, 2019 Memphis municipal elections. Within seventeen days, we brought to light a half-million dollar citywide disinformation campaign, in which more than a dozen campaigns, including the mayor’s, were involved in a pay-to-play scheme that put Republicans and Democrats alike on a widely distributed flyer posing as the local Democratic Party’s list of endorsements.
  • WSJ: The Forces Behind America's Political Divide

    Why are Americans so divided? The Wall Street Journal set out to answer this question in a set of visually-driven stories that made novel use of economic and demographic data, as well as through an analysis of the original response files from the Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll that unearthed new insights. Our exploration found that America's political divisions are being driven by economic and social forces that are fairly new in politics.
  • ProPublica: Civil Wrongs

    Nowhere has the Trump administration's pullback on civil rights been more pronounced or damaging than in education. Under Secretary Betsy DeVos, the Education Department has deep-sixed thousands of civil rights complaints — especially those alleging systemic discrimination by school districts and colleges. In their series, "Civil Wrongs," reporters Annie Waldman of ProPublica and Erica L. Green of The New York Times exposed the department's indifference, and the toll on African-American, Latino, and Native American students from Virginia to Montana. Their work has already had significant impact, and is likely to be even more influential in 2019 as Democrats who now control the U.S. House of Representatives tackle DeVos’ civil rights record. Alongside their reporting, the team, which included news app developers Lena Groeger and David Eads, created two interactive databases: one allowing readers to look up civil rights investigations into their school districts and colleges and another illustrating racial disparities in educational opportunities and discipline.
  • Palm Beach Post: Locked Out

    After seven years in office, Florida Gov. Rick Scott's steps to control the number of felons given the right to vote bore startling results. Not only did he reduce grants of clemency from a flood initiated by his predecessor to a trickle, he granted far fewer to black men and Democrats, a one-of-a-kind Palm Beach Post analysis of clemency records revealed.
  • Michigan State University: Capital expenditure

    This project analyzed 2017 campaign finance data reported by Michigan state lawmakers. The initial intent was to determine how much of those funds came from special interest Political Action Committees rather than individual contributions. It blossomed into 10 stories that looked at such things as the difference in fundraising patterns between men and women, Republicans and Democrats. It ranked the partisanship of the state’s PACs, the largest PAC donors, the lawmakers who received the most and least, those who used the most of their own money and those who used no money at all. It discovered that the NRA spends very little on individual state lawmakers and those who break campaign finance laws rarely get hefty fines.
  • Benghazi: Rescue Interrupted

    Within days of the House Benghazi Committee releasing the results of its investigation, we sort through the partisanship and reveal new facts never before reported. These new facts, provided by multiple Obama administration insiders, undercut claims by Obama officials as well as both Democrats and Republicans in Congress. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rt_WzSNasG0
  • Business Donors Shunning McCain for Democratic Candidates

    Republican corporate donors in 2004 are now giving to Democrats or not at all.
  • The Truth About the Fast and Furious Scandal

    When Republicans, Democrats, and the media agree that a series of events occurred, it must be true, right? That was the situation Katherine Eban faced when she began investigating the Fast and Furious scandal. As portrayed by congressional Republicans and conceded by a Democratic U.S. attorney general, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives had allegedly adopted a disastrous policy of intentionally allowing weapons to be illegally trafficked to Mexican drug lords. Those allegations were the basis for a major congressional investigation and a national scandal. They ultimately led to the first instance in U.S. history in which a cabinet member, Attorney General Eric Holder, was deemed in contempt of Congress (because he refused to turn over documents relating to Fast and Furious). But Eban’s reporting in “The Truth About the Fast and Furious Scandal” showed that, in fact, the ATF never had a policy to permit gun trafficking. Yes, weapons made their way to Mexico, but it occurred because of lax laws and prosecutors who interpreted those laws so strictly as to make gun seizures almost impossible. To uncover the truth, Eban combed through 2,000 pages of confidential ATF documents and interviewed 39 people, including seven agents involved in the case. In six months of exhaustive investigation, Eban persuaded the ATF agents at the heart of the case—including the leader of the team at issue, who had never spoken to the press before—to give their accounts. She then crafted a riveting narrative that exposed the hypocrisy of the political maneuverings around the business of selling and using guns. Most important, the article explained exactly why our system fails to stop weapons from being trafficked. Befitting the charged subject, Fortune’s article provoked an unprecedented wave of response on its website, national media attention, considerable fury from gun advocates—the FBI investigated threats made to Eban after the article appeared—and angry objections from figures who came in for criticism in the story. Rep. Darrell Issa and Sen. Charles Grassley, both leading figures in the congressional investigation, devoted a 49-page appendix to a congressional report, with an additional 140 pages of allegedly supporting documents, to try to rebut the story. And an ostensible ATF whistleblower whose allegations were challenged by Eban’s reporting filed suit against Fortune’s publisher. In the end, the best stories—and the ones that contradict a universally held view—often stir up the most anger.
  • Why Health Insurers Are Winning

    Even though the health reform promises to be of value to everyone, one group would benefit the most. This group is the insurance companies. The interests of the insurance companies have been shaping the health care reform and ensure their own enrichment. This has been done by lobbying, which has influenced the conservative Democrats.
  • How A Long Island Nursing Home Got It's Way

    "Ten Filipino nurses at a nursing home in Smithtown, Long Island were charged with endangering patients for resigning en masse to protest working conditions." Further investigation showed that U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer helped the home, which had "contributed more than $75,000 to the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee."