Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "HUD" ...

  • Washington Post: Appointees

    The Post vetted Trump’s appointees, from the most visible to the virtually unknown, in ways the White House had not. Some of the results were disqualifying.
  • Speaking up for Special Needs

    Investigation found an alarming number of children with disabilities in Wisconsin are dying from abuse or neglect, despite repeated calls to child protective service agencies. Our reporting found cases would be closed or not fully investigated when victims, who had disabilities, had a hard time communicating or couldn’t speak clearly. https://youtu.be/TOivj3kuc7c
  • Understaffed and Underserved

    "Understaffed and Underserved: A Look Inside America’s Nursing Homes" exposed staffing discrepancies, racial disparities and billions of dollars in questionable HUD-backed mortgages granted to facilities across the country, revealing the intersection of nursing home companies’ profit-driven practices with weak governmental oversight that all too often leads to devastating, and even fatal, consequences for some of the nation’s most vulnerable citizens. The project generated widespread media pickup, resulted in the filing of federal legislation, the GAO saying it would investigate the five-star rating system and contributed to federal policy change by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Advocates throughout the nation used data from the project to advocate for legislative change, while a law professor had her students do field testing for a potential civil rights law suit and plans to request HUD Secretary Julian Castro to initiate a complaint against a Chicago-area nursing home chain.
  • Offshore Secrets

    The Center for Public Integrity's International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) sparked public outrage and government action throughout 2014 by exposing secret tax deals and offshore holdings involving a multitude of powerful players in the U.S. and beyond – including Pepsi, Disney, FedEx and other mega-corporations; Communist China’s political and financial elite; a top U.K. government minister; even the president of the Republic of Seychelles.
  • Understaffed and Underserved: A Look Inside America’s Nursing Homes

    "Understaffed and Underserved: A Look Inside America’s Nursing Homes" exposed staffing discrepancies, racial disparities and billions of dollars in questionable HUD-backed mortgages granted to facilities across the country, revealing the intersection of nursing home companies’ profit-driven practices with weak governmental oversight that all too often leads to devastating, and even fatal, consequences for some of the nation’s most vulnerable citizens. The project generated widespread media pickup and resulted in state and federal politicians pledging to take action.
  • Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze

    “Secrecy For Sale: Inside The Global Offshore Money Maze” is one of the largest and most complex cross-border investigative projects in journalism history. The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists collaborated with 112 journalists in 58 countries in stripping away the biggest mystery associated with tax havens: the owners of anonymous “shell companies,” which are the tools of choice for money launderers, tax dodgers and other financial wrongdoers. The reporting was based on 2.5 million secret files related to 10 offshore centers. The files contain details on more than 120,000 offshore companies and trusts and nearly 130,000 individuals and agents, in more than 170 countries and territories.
  • Bearlando

    Bears are cute until they break into your home, or destroy your porch, or attack your dog, or attack you. Oddly, the people of Metro Orlando had come to terms with living with bears a long time ago as the animals occasionally emerged from nearby forests to wander suburban and urban neighborhoods. But in the past three to five years the incidents have become far more common -- and far more commonly terrifying -- as more and bolder bears blurred the frontier between forests and the city. The Orlando Sentinel looked into it, assigning projects reporter Scott Powers and local government reporter Stephen Hudak. By obtaining and analyzing state bear complaint data, they discovered the Orlando area is far and away the worst in Florida for bear-human encounters -- and the encounters have indeed been rapidly increasing. The number of such complaints more than doubled from 2008 to 2013, after having doubled between 2003 and 2008. Beyond that, Hudak and Powers set out to tell the stories of people living with bears. In particular, they found one large suburban area in the northwest part of the metropolis was experiencing so many bear encounters that residents said they rarely called them in anymore, unless the bears caused real trouble. Bears would ravage garbage cans, steal the dog's food, pick fruit trees clean, and sneak into garages and kitchens to raid freezers and pantries. While there were no reports on record of bears ever killing humans in Florida, and injury reports were rare, all too often, they also would destroy property and terrorize humans and their pets.
  • Living Apart: Fair Housing in America

    The series documents 45 years of neglect of one of the most sweeping civil rights laws in our country’s history. The investigation found that the federal government made a decision almost immediately after the passage of the 1968 Fair Housing Act not to enforce the key provisions of the law, including the mandate to promote residential integration. The stories and maps reveal how politics hobbled the reach of the law, severely limiting both the resources and the will of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to use its vast powers to force communities to undue decades of government-sanctioned segregation. It showed how HUD has from its roots been an agency conflicted about enforcing the law and how those charged with enforcement are undertrained and often maligned within the agency. As a result of the law’s neglect by a succession of Republican and Democratic Administrations, our investigation found that segregation patterns in the cities with the largest proportion of black residents have barely budged.
  • Not all of Hinchey's earmarks live up to billing

    One of the leading politicians in central New York is longtime US Rep. Maurice Hinchey. He has been unapologetic and prolific crafting earmarks that steer federal funds into his sprawling district. Many in the Hudson Valley can see the results: a pedestrian bridge that spans the Hudson River, renovations for an historic opera house and help to at-risk youth. There are dozens and dozens of others. By one estimate, two years ago the senior Democrat was among the nation's top 12 earmarking members of Congress. But a review found his earmarks have not always lived up to billing. Money for solar energy companies that did not create hundreds of promised jobs. A presidential helicopter that was supposed to be built largely in Owego, NY, is scrapped, and was decried by President Obama and US Sen. John McCain, among others, as an extremely wasteful. Also not fulfilling promises was a military contractor where dozens of jobs were predicted. While Hinchey had been identified in the past as prolific with earmarks, even the past two years finding ways to work around Congress’ ostensible ban on earmarks, no one had gone back through the public record to examine on a large scale whether key projects lived up to promises. The students obtained and examined federal databases on earmarks, read the public record on pronouncements at the time the earmarks were issued, and identified key projects that did not live up to billing.
  • Skin & Bone: The Shadowy Trade in Human Body Parts

    "Skin & Bone" documented how tissues taken from corpses in poor countries are used to make advanced medical and dental products for rich countries, fueling a Wall Street-bankrolled industry that has transformed what was once a non-profit system into a for-profit business. This story was not about well-regulated transplant organs but about tendons taken from corpses to repair injured knees, putty made of cadaver bone to restore teeth, skin from the dead used to replace breasts after cancer or to augment lips and penises through cosmetic surgery. The series exposed an ineffective regulatory system that does little to police the trafficking and processing of the material. The dead are, in effect, traded like pork bellies in a largely unregulated international market.