Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "ICIJ" ...

  • Paradise Papers: Secrets of the Global Elite

    The “Paradise Papers” exposed secret tax machinations of some of the world’s most powerful people and corporations. The leaked source data came from 21 different sources in almost as many formats, posing a data-management and structuring nightmare. Coping with all that demanded innovation from ICIJ’s multidisciplinary data team, which had to store, secure and structure 13.4 million files that came from two separate offshore service providers and 19 different tax havens, then find a way to share it with journalists on six continents and help them make sense of it all.
  • ICIJ_NBC_AP_Partners: Implant Files

    Implant Files, the largest-ever collaborative health care investigation, sparked reforms by U.S. authorities by exposing the dark side of a global industry that pressures regulators to speed approvals, lower safety standards and cloak information, resulting in a string of grisly accidents that have left hundreds of thousands of patients disfigured, disabled or dead.
  • Dirty Little Secrets: Inside the Panama Papers

    Under the mantle of its “Naked Truth” investigative documentary series, Fusion was chosen by the the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) as one of only two US English-language partners -- and the only one to produce a full-length video documentary -- for its investigation into the Panama Papers, a leak of more than 11.5 million documents from Panamanian law firm Mossack Fonseca.
  • Offshore Secrets

    The Center for Public Integrity's International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) sparked public outrage and government action throughout 2014 by exposing secret tax deals and offshore holdings involving a multitude of powerful players in the U.S. and beyond – including Pepsi, Disney, FedEx and other mega-corporations; Communist China’s political and financial elite; a top U.K. government minister; even the president of the Republic of Seychelles.
  • Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze

    “Secrecy for Sale: Inside the Global Offshore Money Maze” by the Center for Public Integrity’s International Consortium of Investigative Journalists cracked the secret offshore money system that impacts almost every country on earth. This multiplatform entry highlights the best content published on ICIJ website, along with broadcast video web content from by the CBC, a primary media partner.
  • ICIJ: Plunder in the Pacific

    "Plunder in the Pacific," an eight-country investigation, revealed how Asian, European and Latin American fleets have devastated what was once one of the world’s great fish stocks. Jack mackerel in the South Pacific has decreased from around 30 million tons to less than three tons in just two decades. We found that national interests and geopolitical rivalry for six years blocked efforts to ratify a regional fisheries management organization that could impose binding regulations to rescue jack mackerel from further collapse. Bound only by voluntary restrictions, fleets competed in what amounted to a free-for-all in no man’s water.
  • Human Tissue Donation

    It’s a billion dollar business that begins with an act of generosity: When someone or their family agrees to donate a person’s body, for free, after death. When they click the “donor” box on their driver’s license application, most organ donors don’t realize that they have also agreed to donate their tissue. They’ve made a legally binding promise that a private company can take skin, bones, tendons, ligaments and anything that’s not a living organ—and turn it into for-profit medical products. In a four part radio series that aired in July 2012, NPR Correspondent Joseph Shapiro highlighted this little known industry and the shortcomings in regulation that raise concerns among donors, medical professionals, and government officials at many levels. The series was part of a collaboration between NPR’s Investigative Unit and the International Consortium for of Investigative Journalists, a project of the Center for Public Integrity.
  • Tobacco Underground: The Booming Global Trade in Smuggled Cigarettes

    "Tobacco Underground" is groundbreaking series on the global trade in smuggled cigarettes, produced by a team of 14 journalists based in 10 countries. The illicit trafficking of tobacco is a multibillion-dollar business today, fueling organized crime and corruption, robbing governments of needed tax money, and spurring addiction to a deadly product. So profitable is the trade that tobacco is the world's most widely smuggled legal substance. In an interactive, multimedia Web site, ICIJ published a series of nine stories, integrated with undercover footage; audio and video interviews with experts, smugglers and undercover agents; maps and charts; and extensive links to resources ranging from tobacco control groups to repositories of tobacco industry documents.
  • Making a Killing: The Business of War

    This 11-part series by the International Consortium of International Journalists and the Center of Public Integrity examines the "economic conflict in the post-Cold War era and those who profit from it. Individual stories looked at how, amid the military downsizing and increasing number of small conflicts that followed the end of the Cold War, governments are turning increasingly to private military companies -- a newly coined euphemism for mercenaries -- to intervene on their behalf in war zones around the globe. Often, these companies work as proxies for national or corporate interests, whose involvement is buried under layers of secrecy. ICIJ also found that a handful of individuals and companies with connections to governments, multinational corporations, and sometimes criminal syndicates, in Europe, the Middle East and the United States, profited from these wars.Entrepreneurs selling arms and companies drilling and mining in unstable regions have prolonged the conflicts, in which up to 10 million people have died. "