Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Kansas" ...

  • The Journal by KLC: Ogallala Aquifer

    This 7,000-word story by investigative reporter Karen Dillon outlines why it's so difficult for farmers, state officials and local governments to slow the depletion of the Ogallala Aquifer, a vital economic resource for western Kansas. It is based on water-use data acquired through a state open records request. The information helps illustrate the scale of aquifer's depletion and who is most responsible. The Journal is the first publication to our knowledge that has used public records to detail the 150 largest users of the aquifer's groundwater over the past 13 years. This list serves an important public interest since groundwater belongs to the people of Kansas under state law.
  • Sex Offenders in Nursing Homes

    Our Fox 4 investigation discovered 200 registered sex offenders live in nursing homes, residential care facilities, and assisted living facilities in Missouri. Our statewide investigation revealed learned more than 95% of the offenders committed heinous crimes against children, including child molestation, aggravated sexual abuse, and sodomy. We learned Missouri law does not require these homes to disclose that registered sex offenders live in the facilities. There is also no state law requiring background checks on residents of these facilities.
  • Rhino Horn Trafficking in Missouri

    A WDAF Fox 4 investigation revealed Macon, Missouri, was the backdrop for one of the largest rhino horn trafficking operations in the county – an operation that netted nearly $1 million dollars.
  • KCUR Investigates: Ryan Stokes Was Killed By A Kansas City Cop. His Family Wants Police To Tell The Truth

    Ryan Stokes' name isn't mentioned in the same breath as Trayvon Martin or Michael Brown, but it should be. Stokes, a 24-year-old black man in Kansas City, was killed by a police officer after he was wrongfully accused of stealing a white man's cell phone. A KCUR investigation revealed that every detail the Kansas City Police Department told his family was false. His family is left to wonder why his black life didn't matter.
  • KC Star: Stalk. Murder. Repeat.

    Robert J. Gross was a longtime serial murder suspect in Kansas City, implicated in at least four killings over five decades. But he had never been charged in any of them, even though police had been tracking him for years.
  • CBC News - Missing and Murdered: Finding Cleo

    This submission is for a podcast with ten episodes. The submission includes the episodes, an audio trailer as well as a link to the podcast website where you can find other material such as photos and video and text stories and uploaded files of the episode transcripts (as supplementary material) On the surface, this is a true crime story trying to answer the question - what happened to Cleo Semaganis Nicotine? She and her siblings in the Cree Indigenous family were taken into government care in Saskatchewan, Canada in the 1970's and adopted into white families in Canada and the United States. The siblings re-connected as adults but can't find Cleo. They've heard that she ran away from a home in Arkansas and was murdered but they don't know if that is true. They want help to at least find where she is buried.
  • ADG: Violent Reality

    Since 1999, more than 8,000 Arkansans have died by gunfire — about half of them suicides. Although many law enforcement officials and legislators say that gun-control laws might work, they are unwilling to act. The stories explore the effect of specific laws on gun violence in other states, suicide-prevention advocates' work with gun sellers to keep weapons out of suicidal individuals' possession, and federal law enforcement's efforts to keep guns out of the hands of felons.
  • ADG: Milking Medicaid

    A Missouri-based nonprofit became Arkansas' largest provider of Medicaid-funded mental health services by milking a flawed system that has drawn the attention of federal prosecutors — and resulted in the convictions of several former lawmakers for public bribery and conspiracy.
  • Tragedy on Table Rock Lake

    Shortly after 7 p.m. on July 19, 2018, a duck boat carrying 31 people sank on Table Rock Lake near Branson, Mo., about 210 miles southeast of Kansas City. Reporters at The Kansas City Star immediately started reporting and writing from the newsroom, eventually confirming that 17 people had died. At the same time, a team of reporters and photographers headed to Branson. That night, reporters also began investigating what went wrong, and at 6:45 the next morning, less than 12 hours after the accident, The Star published its first investigative story on the incident.
  • Architecture & Design Turmoil

    This series is the result of a tip about a secret settlement with a faculty member that blossomed into a five-part series on turmoil within the Architecture and Design School at the University of Kansas. It encompasses deep background interviews and a series of public record requests.