Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Missouri" ...

  • ADG: Milking Medicaid

    A Missouri-based nonprofit became Arkansas' largest provider of Medicaid-funded mental health services by milking a flawed system that has drawn the attention of federal prosecutors — and resulted in the convictions of several former lawmakers for public bribery and conspiracy.
  • A County In Crisis

    Our investigation in Clay County, Missouri, exposed possible misuse of taxpayers’ funds, questionable credit card expenses, slashed budgets, infighting among elected county officials and the mishandling of a program designed to ensure the indigent receive a proper burial. We learned the body of one indigent woman sat in the morgue for a year.
  • Labeled for Life

    “Labeled for Life”, a three-part investigative series, published by the Columbia Missourian in May of 2018, exposed and explored Missouri’s rigid sex offender laws months prior to a major legislative change that enabled some registrants to petition to be removed from the lifetime list. This local reporting project began as a class assignment and grew into a big national story that brought to light Missouri’s booming export of sex offenders to neighboring states where laws are not as stringent.
  • Tragedy on Table Rock Lake

    Shortly after 7 p.m. on July 19, 2018, a duck boat carrying 31 people sank on Table Rock Lake near Branson, Mo., about 210 miles southeast of Kansas City. Reporters at The Kansas City Star immediately started reporting and writing from the newsroom, eventually confirming that 17 people had died. At the same time, a team of reporters and photographers headed to Branson. That night, reporters also began investigating what went wrong, and at 6:45 the next morning, less than 12 hours after the accident, The Star published its first investigative story on the incident.
  • Prison Broke

    The Pitch's investigation revealed millions of dollars were quietly paid to Missouri prison guards who were harassed and retaliated against by supervisors and coworkers. The director resigned amid state probes.
  • The Wolves of Jefferson City

    Kansas City Star reporters proved that the speaker of the Missouri House had an ongoing, sexually charged relationship with a 19‐year‐old intern; that a state senator had a habit of harassing interns; and that women in the Capitol routinely suffered predatory treatment from a statehouse culture born out of an earlier, uglier era. Their stories led to resignations of the speaker and state senator, and reform within the legislature.
  • UMKC Loses Top Rankings

    After a Kansas City Star investigation challenged top rankings awarded to the business school at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, the university pushed back. The rankings were the cornerstone of UMKC's efforts to attract students and tap into the wealth of H&R Block founder Henry Bloch. A subsequent audit supported the newspaper's findings that business school leaders had knowingly submitted false data for rankings. In short order, the school was stripped of academic honors, the university chancellor apologized, two faculty members resigned, and Henry Bloch issued a statement saying he was "shocked and terribly disappointed."
  • The Injustice System: Cops, Courts and Greedy Politicians

    Our primary entry is an hour-long, commercial free documentary that exposes the role police, municipal courts and politicians play in a revenue-driven system of law enforcement in St. Louis County. KMOV’s investigation was sparked by issues revealed following the protests and riots in Ferguson, MO. News 4 Investigates repeatedly documented the abuses that are prompting major reforms in local police departments and courts. The documentary is part of a major ongoing investigation that includes more than 40 stories revealing misconduct, incompetence, racism and greed in policing and the courts. KMOV’s investigation prompted the Bellefontaine Neighbors police department to end its ticket quota system. It also forced the resignation of a judge, the termination of a police officer, and following our report on the Bellefontaine Neighbors PD, city officials met with representatives from the United States Department of Justice for a series of community meetings focusing on policing practices. Our stories were played during those meetings. KMOV’s reports were also played by state senators during sessions of the Missouri state legislature and cited as part of the evidence documenting the need for reform.
  • Tragedy on the Water

    A 20-year-old Iowa man died on May 31, 2014, while in the custody of a Missouri Highway Patrol trooper on the Lake of the Ozarks. Brandon Ellingson, stopped for suspicion of boating while intoxicated, was being transported to a patrol zone office when he fell – or, as the patrol initially said, jumped – from the trooper’s boat. His wrists were locked in handcuffs behind his back, and the life vest the trooper had placed over his head soon came off. Ellingson struggled to keep his head above water for several minutes before slipping to the bottom of the lake. Subsequent reporting revealed a series of mistakes by the trooper, a road veteran who had not received proper training to work the water after the Missouri Water Patrol was merged into the Highway Patrol in 2011.
  • Getting Off Easy

    From 2009 through 2013, judges in Jackson County, Mo., awarded probation for the worst violent crimes more often than their counterparts in any other court jurisdiction in the state. A Kansas City Star data analysis showed that during that period, one-quarter of people convicted of first-degree assault and one-third of those convicted of first-degree robbery received probation in Jackson County. Some of those defendants later committed far worse crimes. In addition, Jackson County gave probation more often for second-degree murder and voluntary manslaughter convictions than all the other jurisdictions in Missouri combined.