Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Saskatchewan" ...

  • The Grader Operator

    April 1st, 2017, a snowy Easter Saturday. That's the day Brenda Duhaime thinks it all started going wrong for her husband, Robert. Robert worked as a grader operator, clearing the roads in rural Saskatchewan. But that day, his grader got stuck in a ditch. And shortly after, Brenda says he started receiving angry phone calls from work. It took a toll on his mental health -- but when Robert applied for stress leave, his claim was denied. Four months later, Robert took his own life. And now his widow is trying to get answers.
  • Racism in the Ranks

    The 2018 acquittal of Gerald Stanley in the death of Colten Boushie reverberated across the country. Indigenous people rallied against what they saw as an injustice. “We knew we really went back 10 years, maybe fifteen years on all the work we’ve been trying to do in this province in this country on reconciliation.” – Darlene Okemaysim-Sicotte, Advocate for Indigenous women Stanley shot and killed Boushie after the 22-year-old Cree man and friends had driven on Stanley’s farm in rural Saskatchewan. In the midst of the debate over whether the not guilty verdict was a symptom of systemic racism or support of the right to defend property, APTN Investigates video journalist Trina Roache discovered racist posts by an RCMP (ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE) officer on social media.
  • LAST RESORT

    It was a difficult journey through the past for two men who were sent to a behaviour modification camp as young offenders in the 1970s. In fall 2018, Richard Yarema and Guy Dumas returned with APTN Investigates’ reporter Christopher Read to the fly-in facility operated by the Ranch Erhlo Society in northern Saskatchewan. The story chronicles the brief and violent history of “wilderness challenge” camps where the majority of campers were Indigenous.
  • Justice for Colten

    Colten Boushie, a 22-year old Cree youth was shot in the head by Saskatchewan farmer Gerald Stanley. That is undisputed. So, why the not-guilty verdict? That decision sparked protests across the country and brought race relations in Canada into sharp focus with some Indigenous people seeing a justice system steeped in colonialism and white supremacy.
  • CBC News - Missing and Murdered: Finding Cleo

    This submission is for a podcast with ten episodes. The submission includes the episodes, an audio trailer as well as a link to the podcast website where you can find other material such as photos and video and text stories and uploaded files of the episode transcripts (as supplementary material) On the surface, this is a true crime story trying to answer the question - what happened to Cleo Semaganis Nicotine? She and her siblings in the Cree Indigenous family were taken into government care in Saskatchewan, Canada in the 1970's and adopted into white families in Canada and the United States. The siblings re-connected as adults but can't find Cleo. They've heard that she ran away from a home in Arkansas and was murdered but they don't know if that is true. They want help to at least find where she is buried.
  • The Bell of Batoche - The Mystery Solved

    Journalist Todd Lamirande spent years trying to solve one of the enduring mysteries of Canada's Metis* people: What happened to the famed "Bell of Batoche"? The bell originally hung in the cathedral of Batoche, Saskatchewan, the provisional capital of Metis leader Louis Riel during the Riel Rebellion in 1885. The bell had come to symbolize the nationhood of the Metis people and after a final battle which ended in the defeat of Riel's forces and the seizure of Batoche, 2 Canadian soldiers took the bell as a war trophy and returned with it to Ontario. The bell's last known location was a Canadian Legion hall, a gathering place for former soldiers. The bell vanished after a mysterious break-in at the Legion in 1991. It remained hidden for over 20 years.
  • Beauty and the breast: the implant controversy continues

    The investigation found that Mentor, one of the two biggest companies in implant business may have knowingly allowed faulty breast implants onto the market, forcing women in both countries to go under needless surgeries. Canadian women were applying for long-term disability because the implants had made them too sick to work. Women from four provinces-Ontario, Saskatchewan, Quebec and British Columbia had filed class-action suits against Health Canada.