Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Tennessee" ...

  • The Marshall Project and USA TODAY NETWORK - Tennessee: Too Sick for Jail — But Not for Solitary

    “Too Sick for Jail — But Not for Solitary” revealed for the first time the devastating toll of Tennessee’s “safekeeper” law that puts people in solitary confinement who are mentally ill, pregnant or juveniles despite not being convicted of any crime — and sparked prompt changes to the state’s 150-year-old law.
  • NewsChannel 5 Investigates: Toxic School Water

    This yearlong investigation – more than two dozen stories that culminated in an hourlong, primetime special -- exposed students drinking lead-contaminated water inside Nashville schools, parents being kept in the dark about the test results, as well as officials secretly plotting to bypass lead filters to save money and using testing methods that disguised the real contamination. Through persistence and dogged reporting, we exposed a scandal that would make national news in 2018. As a result, the head of facilities for the school district was forced to resign. District officials were also pressured by Nashville’s mayor and health department to reform their testing practices. In addition, our intense focus on the issue in 2018 would be credited with reviving legislation that’s designed to help keep children across Tennessee safe.
  • NewsChannel 5 Investigates: The Investigators

    This yearlong investigation – which produced more than 30 individual stories -- exposed a culture of arrogance inside the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation, questioning whether Tennessee’s top law enforcement agency acted as if it were above the law, exposing deficiencies in how the state’s top cop is selected, and revealing serious issues about who investigates the investigators.
  • Corruption in the Cumberland

    For a year, the News4 I-Team investigated political corruption in the Upper Cumberland area of Middle Tennessee. The investigation has resulted in two criminal investigations into mayors, the termination of the head of a government agency, a state investigation, a state audit, a federal lawsuit and the payback of taxpayer dollars.
  • Veterans Deserve Better

    While veterans in Northeast Tennessee and Southwest Virginia endured some of the longest wait times in the nation, a nearly yearlong review of federal disciplinary records revealed Mountain Home VA Medical Center employees abused, disrespected and refused to help some patients and some kept their jobs.
  • Dishonorable Conduct

    This prime time documentary showcased a year's worth of investigative reporting from WSMV-TV's investigative unit into the Tennesseee National Guard, prompting developments including an assistant district attorney publicly questioning the Governor and the Major General, and a Molotov cocktail thrown at the house of one of our whistle blowers.
  • Injustice in the Valley

    WJHL's review of abuse cases at Greene Valley Developmental Center, Tennessee's last state-run facility for people with intellectual disabilities, uncovered underreporting by the Tennessee Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and a lack of proper investigation by police. The original investigation took five months and relied on hundreds of pages of public records and continued in the months after. Their findings prompted two criminal investigations, the arrest of a former employee for abuse (pending trial), a police chief's apology and a change in state abuse and neglect reporting protocol in Tennessee's Third Judicial District.
  • Dishonorable Conduct

    This prime time documentary showcased a year's worth of investigative reporting from WSMV-TV's investigative unit into the Tennessee National Guard, prompting developments including an assistant district attorney publicly questioning the Governor and the Major General, and a Molotov cocktail thrown at the house of one of our whistleblowers. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LD-2vDBdIOE&feature=youtu.be http://www.wsmv.com/story/31370495/court-records-testimony-show-recruiter-accused-of-rape-before-shooting-guardsmen http://www.wsmv.com/story/32296052/retired-first-sgt-says-curse-filled-resignation-letters-stems-from-toxic-leadership
  • Racial Slurs Are Woven Deep Into The American Landscape

    The removal of the confederate flag from the Statehouse in South Carolina spawned the re-evaluation of confederate symbols across the South. We were curious to know how many other locations across the US still had names that would be considered derogatory in today’s society. We used Vocativ’s proprietary technology identify cities, towns, lakes, springs, mines and local landmarks with a potentially hurtful name. We then created a series of data visualizations including an interactive map that can searched by state to show hundreds of federally recognized places across the nation that include racial slurs in their names. Some examples are Dead Negro Hollow in Tennessee, Wetback Tank in New Mexico and Dead Injun Creek in Oregon.
  • Driven to death by phone scammers

    It started with a call from Jamaica and ended in a suicide in a Tennessee basement. In between, Albert Poland Jr. had sent tens of thousands of dollars to the man on the phone promising millions. At 81 and suffering from dementia, Poland had fallen victim to a lottery scam that costs thousands of Americans an estimated $300 million annually -- and has turned deadly in both countries.