Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

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Search results for "Yemen" ...

  • Yemen’s Dirty War: An Associated Press Investigation

    A year-long investigative series revealing how key players in Yemen’s dirty war have engaged in atrocities and corruption — torturing prisoners, deploying child soldiers and stealing food aid intended for the starving.
  • Yemen's War: Made in America

    When a Saudi air strike hit a school bus in August killing 40 children, CNN’s Nima Elbagir was ahead of her competitors in covering the event from London using footage and information from a cadre of carefully vetted Yemen-based journalists. Using this local network, and with the consultation of weapons experts, Nima and her team proved the bomb used in the attack was US-made. Then they went further and obtained exclusive access to documentation on a string of other civilian bombings in Yemen, proving that in many cases the rain of death in Yemen is made in America.
  • NYT Mag: From Arizona to Yemen - The Journey of an American Bomb

    In one narrative feature, rendering the world’s worst humanitarian catastrophe on a small, personal scale, in order to make it feel relevant, tactile, and immediate to western readers. The hope was to collapse the distance and let Western readers feel what it was like to be the victim of an airstrike in Yemen, and to be a patient in hospital deprived of resources by a blockade. We wanted the crisis to feel familiar and close, rather than distant and exotic. By investigating the provenance of a bomb used and telling the story of its journey from an American assembly line to the planes above people we’d come to care about, showing readers how intertwined their own lives are with the lives of Yemenis.
  • BuzzFeed News: American Mercenaries

    This was an 8-month investigation that uncovered a privately-run assassination program in Yemen run by American Special Operations veterans and reservists working as mercenaries. Hired by the United Arab Emirates, Americans were sent to kill civilian political leaders from an Islamist party. The team, paid millions of dollars, was made up of about a dozen veterans from the most combat-skilled units America has: former SEALS, former Delta Force, and even former CIA ground branch. It was led by a charismatic former French Foreign Legionnaire who lives in the US suburbs.
  • War crimes and corruption in Yemen

    A collection of stories from AP correspondent Maggie Michael’s groundbreaking investigations of corruption, torture and other war crimes in Yemen.
  • How your 401k profits from bombing Yemen

    An exclusive investigation series tracking shipments of weapons exported by Italy to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates since the bombing campaign on Yemen began in March 2015. The investigation found verifiable evidence of the Italian-manufactured bombs on the ground in Yemen, and showed how readers may be profiting from the sales of these weapons through sovereign and institutional funds.
  • The Drone Papers

    The Intercept obtained a cache of secret documents detailing the inner workings of the U.S. military’s assassination program in Afghanistan, Yemen, and Somalia. The documents, provided by a whistleblower within the intelligence community who worked on the drone program, offer an unprecedented glimpse into the U.S. military’s kill/capture operations during a key time in the evolution of the drone wars. After six months of reporting by a team of seven, The Intercept published The Drone Papers, a multimedia package of eight articles that revealed a deeply conflicted U.S. military and intelligence community secretly driving a program that kills far more people than the intended targets, causing serious harm to U.S. moral standing and national security. https://theintercept.com/drone-papers/
  • Nation Institute (TomDispatch and The Intercept) coverage of the U.S. Military in Africa

    I wrote an untitled collection of articles for The Nation Institute’s TomDispatch.com and First Look Media’s The Intercept investigating the U.S. military’s extensive and largely secret operations on the African continent. Utilizing documents obtained via the Freedom of Information Act and from a whistle blower as well as a plethora of open source material, I offered a rare glimpse of the actions of a very secretive military command. Along the way, I revealed covert U.S. drone bases used for targeted killing campaigns from Yemen and Somalia to Iraq and Syria; I exposed unreported drug use and criminal behavior by U.S. forces across Africa; and shined a light on a multitude of missions in which elite U.S. forces trained alongside members of African armies regularly cited by the State Department for human rights abuses; among many other revelations. (While The Intercept may not fit the definition of a small outlet, I generally work alone and receive only spare support beyond editing. And TomDispatch is a truly tiny outlet.) https://theintercept.com/drone-papers/target-africa/ https://theintercept.com/2015/10/21/stealth-expansion-of-secret-us-drone-base-in-africa/ https://theintercept.com/2016/02/10/where-to-invade-next-is-the-most-subversive-movie-michael-moore-has-ever-made/
  • Objective Troy: A Terrorist, A President, and the Rise of the Drone

    Objective Troy tells the story of the life and death of Anwar al-Awlaki, the American imam who denounced 9/11 and called for bridge-building between Muslims and the United States, only to leave the U.S., grow steadily more militant and join Al Qaeda in Yemen. He became the most effective recruiter for Al Qaeda in English; actively plotted to kill Americans, including by coaching the underwear bomber who tried to blow up an airliner over Detroit in 2009; and finally became the first American citizen to be deliberately killed in a drone strike, on orders of President Obama in 2011. The book’s title comes from Awlaki’s code name on the government’s kill list: during a frantic 20-month manhunt that engaged all of the intelligence agencies, Awlaki was Objective Troy. Reported all over the United States and in Yemen, Objective Troy is the most detailed and best-documented account of the life of a central figure in the post-9/11 history of terrorism. Among the revelations in the book are: the first account of Awlaki’s embrace of fundamentalist Islam, while a freshman at Colorado State; the real reason that Awlaki left the United States, abandoning a promising career as a mainstream spokesman for American Muslims; an intelligence mistake in the hunt for Awlaki that led to the disastrous unintentional killing by drone of a popular Yemeni deputy governor; and Awlaki’s afterlife on the Internet, including more than 40,000 YouTube videos, now with the added authority of what his admirers see as martyrdom. The book gives the fullest account to date of President Obama’s embrace of the armed drone as a weapon against terrorism and how its performance has fallen short of the government’s claims.
  • Drones

    With U.S. officials disclosing scant details of drone strikes targeting suspected terrorists in Pakistan, Yemen and elsewhere, NBC News' Investigative Unit went to work to find out what the government wasn't telling us about the program. Over the course of the year, numerous reporters, producers and correspondents contributed to a thorough report that shed light on many different aspects of the program and broke news about the use of the remote-controlled aircraft..