Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "apartments" ...

  • Toronto Star: Rise of Ghost Hotels

    The data investigation began with the question: Is Airbnb exacerbating Toronto's rental crisis by enabling short-term operations to flourish at the expense of long-term rental stock? We analyzed more than 20,000 Airbnb listings data scraped by independent third-party website insideairbnb.com. We also filed requests for documents on business incorporation to validate our findings about commercial operators.
  • The Daily News: New York City Housing Authority Expose

    The New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) repeatedly lied to deny the findings of a lengthy investigation by Daily News reporter Greg. B. Smith that uncovered fetid conditions at the 175,000 apartments in the country's largest housing authority. Once the cover-up was exposed, NYCHA entered into an unprecedented consent decree to allow a federal monitor to oversee its operations.
  • ProPublica and Frontline: The Right To Fail

    As part of a landmark 2014 settlement, hundreds of people with severe mental illness were moved from troubled group homes and into their own “supported housing” apartments. The idea was that, even if they had spent most of their lives in institutions, dependent on others for food, shelter and a medication regimen, a robust safety net of service providers would help them navigate independence. While many reporters have exposed problems at institutions, ProPublica’s Joaquin Sapien and Frontline’s Tom Jennings took an unprecedented look at what has been heralded as the solution — independent housing. They learned that though many are thriving, the sudden shift was sometimes perilous, especially for the most fragile residents.
  • 'Not Wanted': Racial Bias at Trump Properties

    In the weeks leading up to the presidential election, the NBC News Investigative Unit and MSNBC broadcast an in-depth report on the Trump family business’s racist practices in the 1960's through the early 1980's, when African-Americans seeking to rent apartments in New York City were turned away because of the color of their skin.
  • Migrant farmworker housing abuses

    Based on extensive interviews and a review of thousands of inspection reports, the Midwest Center for Investigative Reporting has found that chronically poor living conditions persist because the government agencies responsible for enforcing housing standards are often overwhelmed by workload or rendered ineffective by inadequate budgets and toothless policies. Abusive housing practices of both multibillion-dollar agribusiness corporations and small-scale growers continue to flourish as a result. And migrant farmworkers season after season are left to live in rundown apartments, ramshackle trailers and converted motels.
  • Serbian Government Assets Revealed

    KRIK decided to focus on revealing corruption and crime at the highest levels of power. In late 2015 our team of journalists started to expose the hidden assets of Serbian politicians, as well as their relationship networks and potential wrongdoing. Our first discovery in this field was that Sinisa Mali, the Mayor of Belgrade, has secretly bought 24 resort apartments on the Bulgarian Black Sea coast through offshore companies from British Virgin Islands. This story has attracted huge attention from the Serbian public and it was picked up in all Serbian media. That inspired us to continue to investigate the mayor’s business deals in 2016 but also expand our investigation on other political elites. This one year investigation resulted in publishing a complete database of assets and businesses of all ministers from the new Serbian government in December 2016. https://imovinapoliticara.krik.rs/display/
  • Shadow Campus

    The series found that Boston colleges have added thousands of students without enough housing to accommodate them all, pushing students into dangerously overcrowded apartments in surrounding neighborhoods and putting students' lives at risk. A Globe team discovered that overcrowded apartments were rampant in student neighborhoods, including many that were firetraps or riddled with pests, broken locks and other hazards. Local colleges reneged on promises to building more housing and steered students to one of the city's most notorious landlords. Local housing regulators seemed powerless or unwilling to tackle the issue. And families were gradually replaced by absentee landlords, changing the character of key parts of the city.
  • The Magnitsky Affair

    The Magnitsky project uncovered how nearly a billion dollars that disappeared from the Russian treasury ended up in offshore accounts, paper companies and apartments in New York City to the benefit of two privileged Russians and their associates. The Russian government had maintain that tracing the lost money was impossible because important records had been lost in what they described as an accident. They never tried, but OCCRP reporters painstakingly combed through hard-to-obtain bank records, land records and other documents to trace the money as it was hidden, transferred and laundered. The project has sparked investigations in a handful of countries, won numerous journalism accolades and has kept alive the memory of Segei Magnitsky, the Russian lawyer turned whistleblower who paid with his life for trying to expose the corrupt theft of tax money in Moscow.
  • Power Failure; Food Fight

    "Working class immigrant reidents are forced to evacuate thgeir apartments due to an electircal fire- an incident which revelas unsafe wiring at their nonprofit-run building."
  • Lead's dangerous legacy

    In March 2006 the Ohio Supreme Court ordered the Cincinnati Department of Health make public its records on landlords who hadn't removed poisonous lead paint from their properties. The records showed that 300 homes and apartments were tainted. Since 2002, at least 570 kids had been poisoned and yet the health department had done "little to make landlords clean up the properties."