Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "bomb" ...

  • Bombs In Your Backyard: Investigating One of America’s Greatest Polluters

    The military might of the United States has come at an extraordinary environmental price. The nation’s defense technologies and armaments have been developed, tested, stored, decommissioned and disposed of on vast tracts of American soil, where they have polluted fields and rivers, contaminated drinking water and put legions of people’s health at risk. For the first time, this project examined the full extent of the damage — 39,000 sites adding up to an area larger than the state of Florida, affecting millions of people. Our stories exposed the Pentagon’s routine practice of open burning of hazardous waste; its reliance on incompetent or fraudulent contractors that dump waste or fake cleanups; its four-decade campaign to make a dangerous and pervasive chemical explosive appear safe and avoid regulation; and its explicit refusal to comply with federal environmental laws even when the exposure of young children to lead poisoning from munition was at stake. We gained exclusive access to the Pentagon’s complete environmental dataset, and created a news application which for the first time mapped searchable data about contaminated sites across U.S. territories.
  • Bombs In Your Backyard

    The military might of the United States has come at an extraordinary environmental price. The nation’s defense technologies and armaments have been developed, tested, stored, decommissioned and disposed of on vast tracts of American soil, where they have polluted fields and rivers, contaminated drinking water and put legions of people’s health at risk. For the first time, this project examined the full extent of the damage — 39,000 sites adding up to an area larger than the state of Florida, affecting millions of people. Our stories exposed the Pentagon’s routine practice of open burning of hazardous waste; its reliance on incompetent or fraudulent contractors that dump waste or fake cleanups; its four-decade campaign to make a dangerous and pervasive chemical explosive appear safe and avoid regulation; and its explicit refusal to comply with federal environmental laws even when the exposure of young children to lead poisoning from munition was at stake. We gained exclusive access to the Pentagon’s complete environmental dataset, and created a news application which for the first time mapped searchable data about contaminated sites across U.S. territories.
  • Yemen's War: Made in America

    When a Saudi air strike hit a school bus in August killing 40 children, CNN’s Nima Elbagir was ahead of her competitors in covering the event from London using footage and information from a cadre of carefully vetted Yemen-based journalists. Using this local network, and with the consultation of weapons experts, Nima and her team proved the bomb used in the attack was US-made. Then they went further and obtained exclusive access to documentation on a string of other civilian bombings in Yemen, proving that in many cases the rain of death in Yemen is made in America.
  • SWEDISH RADIO: The bombings, the Security Service and the Nazis

    In November 2016 and January 2017, three bombings are perpetrated in the Swedish city of Gothenburg. The attacks target newly arrived refugees and left-wing activists. One cleaner at a refugee centre is critically injured. The Security Service quickly identifies three local Nazis as those responsible. Later, when they are sentenced by the District Court, the investigation is introduced as a huge success. But when Swedish Radio starts looking into the police investigation, it turns out that the Security Service has had several opportunities to stop the bombings, that they had taken considerable risks in securing evidence, and that one of the bombs were planted right under the noses of the Security Service agents, without them intervening. The review resulted in massive criticism of the Security Service, from the police as well as from experts on terrorism. The review resulted in massive criticism of the Security Service, from the police as well as from experts on terrorism.
  • NYT Mag: From Arizona to Yemen - The Journey of an American Bomb

    In one narrative feature, rendering the world’s worst humanitarian catastrophe on a small, personal scale, in order to make it feel relevant, tactile, and immediate to western readers. The hope was to collapse the distance and let Western readers feel what it was like to be the victim of an airstrike in Yemen, and to be a patient in hospital deprived of resources by a blockade. We wanted the crisis to feel familiar and close, rather than distant and exotic. By investigating the provenance of a bomb used and telling the story of its journey from an American assembly line to the planes above people we’d come to care about, showing readers how intertwined their own lives are with the lives of Yemenis.
  • Canada's role in innocent man's imprisonment

    This investigative report on the extradition of Hassan Diab to France revealed for the first time the secret efforts Canadian officials went to in order to send an innocent man to a French prison. Diab would spend more than 3 years in near-solitary confinement while he was investigated for a bombing outside a Paris synagogue. Canada went to great lengths to extradite Diab despite warnings that the French case was extremely weak. The French case ultimately fell apart due to flimsy evidence.
  • The White Helmets

    In most Syrian cities, there is no police, fire department or government emergency service left, but there is the Syrian Civil Defense, known on the ground by the stark white helmets they wear.
  • Terror in Europe

    An in-depth investigation of the terror campaign that overwhelmed the defenses of Europe in 2015 and 2016. The documentary and companion article told the story of the Charlie Hebdo attacks, the November 2015 attacks on Paris, and the bombings in Brussels in March, 2016, with a focus on the longtime structural flaws in Europe’s counter-terror defenses – problems that were well-known but repeatedly ignored. Our investigation found that many of these problems persist even after the attacks. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/terror-in-europe/
  • 50 Years since the Chinese Cultural Revolution and North Korea: Does the Hydrogen Bomb Test Signal the North Korean Version of the Cultural Revolution?

    North Korea ran a hydrogen bomb test in January, 2016. Some think this signaled the start of Kim Jong-Un’s version of the Cultural Revolution because China’s Cultural Revolution began around the time of their nuclear bomb test in 1964 and their hydrogen bomb test in 1966. The Chinese Cultural Revolution was a sort of power struggle by Mao Zedong where he used the power of the public to get rid of his opponents within the Communist Party and climb back to the top over a period of 10 years starting in 1966. Chinese society ended up with deep scars from hatred and vengeance because of it. For the 50th year anniversary of the Chinese Cultural Revolution, we explore the current state of North Korea’s Kim Jong-Un’s regime, which is carrying out deep-rooted idolization tactics internally while running nuclear weapons and missile tests externally, and try to predict the future of North Korea.
  • Nuclear Risks

    The Obama administration has waged an international campaign to lock down nuclear explosive materials over the past seven years, to stem the risk that a terrorist might detonate a bomb in New York, Washington, or elsewhere. But three countries in particular have proved immune to U.S. pressures for better safeguards: South Africa, Russia, and India. Our deep investigations into their nuclear activities laid bare a toxic mix of ineptitude, nationalism, and greed – and not just in foreign capitals – that keeps the world at risk.