Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "contractors" ...

  • NBC2: Unfinished Business

    It’s by far the biggest complaint that comes to the NBC2 Investigators: Contractors accused of taking money, but not finishing the job. That’s why NBC2 Investigators Rachel Polansky and David Hodges decided to go in-depth with complaints of unfinished business — questioning the system that’s supposed to be holding contractors accountable.
  • Kids on the Line: An investigation into the contractors behind family separation

    As the U.S. government’s family separation policy played out in real time, Reveal’s investigation uncovered major problems with the contractors tasked with caring for immigrant children, including a defense company holding immigrant children in unlicensed facilities -- vacant office buildings in Phoenix without yards, showers or kitchens -- and a Texas shelter drugging immigrant children without their consent.
  • CBS News: National Flood Insurance Mismanagement

    Our EXCLUSIVE six-month CBS News investigation uncovered serious fiscal mismanagement in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), administered by FEMA. Today, that program is 25 billion dollars in the red. We found that as storm victims struggle to rebuild, much of FEMA’s money that could pay homeowners claims actually goes to private insurance companies and legal fees to fight flood victims’ claims. Based on a review of thousands documents related to claims, lawsuits and FOIA requests, private government contractors are getting rich at the expense of desperate flood victims.
  • Poor worker conditions power gig ecomony

    In “Poor worker conditions power gig economy" FT reporter Izabella Kaminska takes on the job of a Deliveroo food delivery rider to investigate whether the so-called 'Uberisation' of the economy – which sees low-wage workers transformed into informal contractors – is a viable and sustainable technological labour innovation. The video likens this new labour structure to a renewed upstairs downstairs society, and questions the economic sustainability of these models in the long term.
  • Allentown FBI investigation

    On July 2, FBI agents raided Allentown City Hall, looking for documents connected with a host of businesses and other entities that received city contracts. It was clear that agents suspected a pay-to-play scheme had been in the works for several years. The first thing The Morning Call’s city hall reporter, Emily Opilo, did was cancel her plans for the Fourth of July holiday, since she knew this story needed her complete attention. For the next six months, Opilo – along with reporters Scott Kraus, Matt Assad and Paul Muschick – scrutinized each entity on the FBI’s subpoena list. Going contractor by contractor, they used the state’s Right-to-Know Law to gather bid sheets, requests for proposals, meeting notes and contracts. Using state and federal campaign finance reports, they matched each contractor against contributions made to Allentown’s mayor when he ran for re-election in 2013, for governor in 2014 and for U.S. Senate in 2015. In each case, contractors also were donors. Often, those that didn’t get contracts were found not to have donated to the mayor’s campaigns.
  • Unsettling Dust

    The series examined Oregon’s failure to protect workers and the public from breathing airborne asbestos fibers during or after building demolitions. The stories found that hundreds of Portland, Oregon homes had been demolished with asbestos in place, creating a cancer risk to anybody who might have breathed airborne asbestos as a result. A Washington region with stricter reporting requirements had a significantly higher compliance rate, we found. The investigation also found that Oregon is the only state failing to meet federal notification standards necessary to prevent contractors from doing large-scale demolitions without first removing asbestos.
  • Revealed: the private firms tracking terror targets at the heart of US drone wars

    An innovative, complex, long-term investigation into one of the most hidden elements of the US drone war - the use of private contractors to determine targets. We built a unique database and processed over 8 million federal transacting records to locate 10 companies offering imagery analysts to the military and interviewed current and former contractors about their experiences.
  • The Man Behind the Closing Curtains

    A six-month Naples Daily News investigation exposed the dark past of theater creator James Duffy. An analysis of media reports, court records, company filings and interviews linked Duffy to 88 theaters in 26 states. Fifty-eight of the theaters either never opened or were open less than three years. A nationwide court case search found James Duffy or his companies have been sued at least 69 times and been ordered to pay at least $24.6 million in judgments since 1982. Duffy’s business convinced property owners to pay millions of dollars up-front for the construction or renovation of their theaters. His companies raked in ticket and concession sales from theaters that did open, but didn’t pay rent or other bills and abandoned theaters as lawsuits were filed. Contractors that should have been paid with the fronted renovation money went unpaid, as did investors, lenders, film distributors and even the lawyers who represented Duffy or his companies when they were sued. Numerous employees have also complained of not being paid.
  • The Invisible Soldiers

    "The Invisible Soldiers" talks about the U.S. national security and its growing "private military" complex and "security companies."
  • An Inside Track

    A groundbreaking investigation by Dallas Morning News reporters Ed Timms and Kevin Krause exposed questionable practices by a nonprofit agency created by local governments in part to avoid public scrutiny of the certification process for minority- and woman-owned businesses.. The reporters and their newspaper fought a lengthy legal battle for more than a year that resulted in a strong legal precedent that may deter other governments from trying to circumvent open records law by forming nonprofits. The investigation revealed that the local governments had relied on a temporary employment firm had operated the nonprofit agency for more than a decade. Employees of that private firm certified their own company as a minority-owned business, even as it won millions in contracts from those same governments. The employees also decided whether their company's competitors and subcontractors got certified. It also disclosed that the company, and other contractors, failed to adequately screen temporary employees provided to Dallas County.