Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "deals" ...

  • How Much are you Overpaying in Property Tax?

    In 2016, an apartment building in Athens County took out a loan for $48.3 million. Yet it was paying property tax as if it were valued at $13.8 million, a whopping $35 million difference. When the Cleveland Plain Dealer first reported on this in 2018, it got us thinking: there's a lot of great data out there that we could put together to see how much this actually costs our readers.
  • Newsday Investigation: Pathway to Power

    In a panoramic, 30,000-word narrative, reporters exposed the underpinnings of Long Island’s corrupt political system through the life of a onetime street hoodlum who would eventually own a castle-like estate that became the Island’s unofficial political clubhouse and the site of a startling attempt on his life. Drilling deep below decades of numbing public scandals, the project is the defining document of how local power works on Long Island, how the public gets exploited and why unscrupulous operators persistently prevail.
  • OCCRP: Paradise Leased: The Theft of the Maldives

    Maldives tourism isn’t all swaying palm trees and white sand beaches. The truth is something far uglier. Thanks to a trove of leaked files, OCCRP reporters have uncovered the details of an audacious multi-million dollar scheme that saw dozens of Maldivian islands leased out to developers in no-bid deals — and the money then stolen. While local tycoons and international investors cashed in, the people of this island paradise in the Indian Ocean saw precious little. The revelations also include fresh evidence that implicates the Maldives’ authoritarian president, Abdulla Yameen, in the scandal.
  • NYT: Cashing in On Cancer

    Conflicts riddle Memorial Sloan Kettering. Top doctors and executives benefit from lucrative side deals. Its staff feels betrayed, its mission is tainted.
  • North Bay Bohemian: Sonoma Trifecta

    The three interlocking stories uncovered a real estate investor-banking-media network that illuminates the shape of Sonoma County’s “shadow” government. A development partnership angling for a county contract includes a county official who partners with a banker who flaunts ethics regulations in a fire disaster rebuild area. An owner of a major local newspaper is a board member of the bank which receives favorable press coverage in the newspaper for its fire deals that do not disclose the ownership connection. Another owner of the newspaper, a real estate investor and political consultant, is found to have defrauded a local Indian tribe in a real estate deal and in cahoots with the son of a U.S. Senator. As we go to press, the newspaper fails to report on the fraud when confronted with the relevant court documents, publishing only a 900 word story on a “dispute” that our 3,500 story unveils as fraud and breach of contract. The need for surviving alt-weeklies to keep publishing hard-hitting LOCAL investigative journalism is reaffirmed.
  • Der Spiegel/EIC: Football Leaks

    This is a cross-border investigation into how the secret deals of club officials, leading associations, agents, investors and players have corrupted the most popular sport in the world. Recent work was undertaken by the network European Investigative Collaborations (EIC) and its partners, which has brought together 15 media and almost 80 journalists from 13 countries, publishing 350 stories in 11 languages across Europe.
  • Arizona Republic: The Charter Gamble

    Reporting by Craig Harris, starting in the spring, revealed one questionable deal after another with Arizona charter schools, as his reporting detailed how the industry had created millionaires through insider deals. By the time lawmakers were calling for reforms, The Arizona Republic built a team to take the next big bite. The deep dive by Harris, along with Anne Ryman, Justin Price and Alden Woods, spun out a five-part series that told the story of Arizona’s charter schools from inception to present day.
  • Arizona Daily Star: Evictions

    Reporter Emily Bregel spent seven months investigating the problem of evictions and lack of affordable housing in Pima County, Arizona. The series ran in print over three days and highlighted the chaotic fall-out following an eviction, the reasons why experts said evictions were about to surge in Pima County and the City of Tucson, as well as the failures in the justice court system that deals with eviction cases. The online story also featured an introductory video created by Emily Bregel and video editor Nick Murray, an interactive map of evictions, audio clips from relevant eviction hears and multiple graphics.
  • Pennsylvania Turnpike investigation

    WTAE TV revealed waste, mismanagement and conflicts of interest at the Pennsylvania Turnpike. Emails showed turnpike officials congratulating themselves for their response to a storm that left more than 500 drivers stranded for more than 20 hours. Records revealed turnpike commissioners getting take-home cars even though they meet only once a month. Documents showed a turnpike commissioner cutting personal business deals with turnpike vendors. All this occurred as the turnpike hiked tolls and cut back on projects to deal with a financial crisis.
  • San Diego's waterfront

    inewsource's investigation uncovered the back-room deals and power politics that shaped some of the most valuable — and public — waterfront land in southern California. With two long-form stories told through every medium possible — text, photo, video, audio, graphics, maps and social media — inewsource helped prevent the same deviant process from occurring again in a neighboring (and equally valuable) plot of land currently under development. The series also helped kickstart mitigation efforts to make part of the original land more publicly accessible. The first story was told using inewsource’s unique transparency technique of providing an interactive text version of the story, allowing readers to view the documentation behind nearly every sentence for themselves using DocumentCloud.