Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "deportation" ...

  • Trapped in Gangland

    The Central American gang MS-13 accounts for 1 percent of U.S. gang murders. But when Donald Trump became president, he seized on the gang’s violence on Long Island to promote tougher immigration policies. This series, co-published with New York magazine, Newsday, The New York Times Magazine and This American Life, showed how Trump’s bungled crackdown on MS-13 burned informants, deported young immigrants suspected of gang involvement on flimsy evidence, and failed to prevent further murders. Based on a year and a half of difficult and dangerous reporting, ProPublica reporter Hannah Dreier’s stories persuasively depicted how an entire subculture of Latino teenagers came to be trapped between the gang and the government.
  • Mexico's Crackdown on Central American Migrants

    In January and February 2015, In These Times reporter Joseph Sorrentino interviewed dozens of Central American migrants along one of Mexico's main migration routes. He found that a Mexican government initiative to more aggressively police and deport migrants had forced them to take slower and more dangerous routes, leaving them easier prey to robbery, rape, extortion, kidnapping, assault and murder by gangs and narcos. Mexico's stepped-up border enforcement was the result of U.S. pressure on Mexico to halt the "surge" of Central American children reaching the U.S. border.
  • Pregnant Detainees in Immigration Detention

    Women caught up in America’s immigration detention complex are some of the most vulnerable in the world. As policy, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) says that pregnant women should be put on house arrest while fighting their deportation cases, rather than detained in prison-like facilities. After they told us repeatedly that they “don’t detain pregnant women” we found quite the contrary. Through serialized reporting, Fusion uncovered that nearly 600 pregnant detainees were held in detention centers in the last two years. Women that we spoke with said they were severely underfed and denied basic prenatal treatment. As the reporter and producer on the project, I, Cristina Costantini, uncovered that the agency even initially lied about a miscarriage that occurred in one detention center.
  • Nazi Social Security

    Dozens of suspected Nazi war criminals and SS guards collected millions of dollars in U.S. Social Security benefits after being forced out of the United States, an Associated Press investigation found. The payments, underwritten by American taxpayers, flowed through a legal loophole that gave the U.S. Justice Department leverage to persuade Nazi suspects to leave the U.S. If they agreed to go, or simply fled before deportation, they could keep their Social Security, according to interviews and internal U.S. government records. Social Security benefits became tools, U.S. diplomatic officials said, to secure agreements in which Nazi suspects would accept the loss of citizenship and voluntarily leave the United States.
  • Speedy Removal

    Thousands of undocumented immigrants are being deported without a chance to appear before an immigration judge.
  • Dying to Get Back

    The death of Alfonso Martinez Sanchez, 39, in March 2012 sparked little attention. A construction worker and father of five who’d lived in Southern California for more than 20 years before being deported to Mexico, he was just another immigrant to die in the Arizona desert while attempting to cross back into the United States. But “Dying to Get Back,” a joint investigation by The Investigative Fund and PBS’s Need to Know, revealed that his death was part of a disturbing phenomenon: even as tighter border security has sent illegal border crossings plummeting, migrant deaths are on the rise — particularly among the deported parents of American children.
  • Haiti Deportees

    The story follows Haitian immigrants deported back to their home country after the earthquake.
  • Deportation Nation

    The series found that Immigration and Customs Enforcement is deporting and freeing potentially dangerous immigrants before they can be held accountable in local courts. Those accused of serious crimes were able to return to their homelands and escape the U.S. justice system.
  • Are Your Papers in Order

    The series reveals how the Sheriff of Maricopa County rounded up illegal aliens for deportation in an effort to remove illegal immigrants. The way this was done was arresting many people without probable cause and simple issues, such as traffic stops. Further, he was stopping darker colored people with alleged infractions and later checking on their residency to determine if they had to be deported or not.
  • Deported: Until we meet again

    For many Ohio jails and retention offices, illegal immigrants can mean big bucks. Contracts with Immigration and Customs Enforcement could allow some sheriff departments to create revenue by keeping immigrants who are waiting to be deported. Many deportees who are eventually deported say they will come back to the U.S.