Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "families" ...

  • NBC News: Taxpayers Financing Slumlords: Under Ben Carson, more families live in HUD housing that fails health and safety inspections

    In a three-month investigation, NBC News found that a growing number of families – more than 47,000 - were living in horrid conditions subsidized by taxpayers in properties regularly inspected by HUD; after we started asking questions, HUD announced an overhaul of its inspection system and said it is now planning to toughen inspections, which will impact millions of low-income American families.
  • Miami Herald: FIU Bridge

    On March 15, an under-construction, 174-foot-long concrete pedestrian bridge collapsed on a busy road next to Florida International University's campus. Five people who by a cruel twist of fate happened to be driving under the bridge were instantly crushed to death. In addition, a worker standing on top of the structure, a joint project managed by both FIU and the state of Florida, was killed in the collapse. Several more people were injured. Herald reporters immediately rushed to the scene to report on the stunning accident. Following the initial coverage, a team of reporters worked for the rest of the year -- fighting for public records all the way -- to uncover why the bridge had fallen, who had oversight of the taxpayer-funded project, why the road below it remained open during crucial structural work and the impact on the families of the dead.
  • KXAN: DENIED

    Texas law gives police discretion to withhold information when suspects die in custody. Legislative efforts to close that loophole have failed, but it has not stopped the families who have been denied video and other records detailing their loved ones' final moments from speaking out. A KXAN investigation sheds light on this statewide need for police accountability, transparency and trust.
  • Kept Out

    Kept Out provided a sweeping indictment of access to credit, showing that millions of Americans are being denied a chance at the American dream simply because of the color of their skin. Because, homeownership is most families’ primary source of wealth, the average white family is now worth 15 times as much as the typical African American one.
  • Kaiser Health News: Unlocked and Loaded: Families Confront Guns and Dementia

    In the U.S., where gun violence kills 96 people each day, there has been vigorous debate about how to stop the carnage, including ways to prevent people with mental illness from acquiring and owning firearms. But an unacknowledged and potentially far bigger problem is what to do about the vast cache of firearms in the homes of aging Americans with dementia. Our four-month investigation, produced in partnership with PBS Newshour, shed new light on an aspect of guns and public health that no one talks about, even though it may affect millions of Americans.
  • GateHouse Media: Failure to Deliver

    More women are choosing to deliver their babies outside the hospital as a part of a growing national trend, but a nine-month investigation by GateHouse Media and the Sarasota Herald-Tribune found that it’s a deadlier practice than hospital deliveries and leaves families little recourse when something goes wrong.
  • Education Grant Debacle Fixed: Teachers to Get Millions Back After NPR Investigation

    NPR’s Chris Arnold and Cory Turner started digging into a Department of Education grant program after spotting a brief mention in a broader lawsuit. What they uncovered was shocking: a program gone horribly wrong for thousands of public school teachers. "It's ridiculous; it's mind-boggling. It's been two years of torture," was how teacher Kaitlyn McCollum of Columbia, Tenn described it. It wasn’t supposed to be this way. The program has a noble goal - to encourage aspiring young teachers like McCollum to work in the nation’s most disadvantaged communities. They agree to teach a high-need subject, like math, for four years in a public school serving low income families. In return, they get grants to pay for their own education. But the reporters found that’s not how it worked out at all. Thousands of teachers had their grants unfairly converted to loans due to a paperwork debacle at the U.S. Department of Education - leaving some bearing the burden of more than $20,000 in debt. Cory and Chris’ work not only exposed the program’s brutal inflexibility and it’s devastating impact on the lives of teachers; their seven stories, reported over the previous ten months, convinced the Department to offer teachers a dramatic fix. As a result of their reporting, the Education Department is now reaching out to thousands of teachers to return millions of dollars of grant money that was unfairly taken away from them.
  • CBS News: Healthcare Fraud in America

    For the past four years, CBS News has been committed to investigating healthcare fraud throughout the United States. Our reporting has uncovered schemes preying on veterans, cancer patients, rural communities, and opioid addicts. We’ve been the only network to expose con artists defrauding billions from private insurance companies, Medicare and even Tricare, a component of the military health system. In 2016 we produced an investigative series that found compounding pharmacies were collecting prescriptions for pain creams and billing insurance more than $1 million per week. Last year, our reporting revealed an insurance scheme involving genetic testing that cost the Pentagon trillions. This year’s entries continue our work to expose unscrupulous actors bilking insurance to cash in on the American healthcare system. Our stories go beyond examining the fiscal toll of insurance fraud, they illustrate the human impact these practices have on communities, families, and individuals.
  • CBC News - Missing and Murdered: Finding Cleo

    This submission is for a podcast with ten episodes. The submission includes the episodes, an audio trailer as well as a link to the podcast website where you can find other material such as photos and video and text stories and uploaded files of the episode transcripts (as supplementary material) On the surface, this is a true crime story trying to answer the question - what happened to Cleo Semaganis Nicotine? She and her siblings in the Cree Indigenous family were taken into government care in Saskatchewan, Canada in the 1970's and adopted into white families in Canada and the United States. The siblings re-connected as adults but can't find Cleo. They've heard that she ran away from a home in Arkansas and was murdered but they don't know if that is true. They want help to at least find where she is buried.
  • Broken Homes, Broken System?

    It's a no-win situation. Families can stay in an unsafe home or call Code Enforcement for help and risk eviction and fines. We compared inspection reports from Code Enforcement with eviction records from Magistrate Court. We found a system breakdown that allows bad landlords to keep tenants in unsafe homes. The deeper we dug into city records, the more we uncovered. Our investigation lead to a change in city code. The city adopted stricter fines. Code Enforcement developed a follow-up system for complaints. Magistrate began looking at prior code violations before ruling on an eviction.