Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "felonies" ...

  • The Marshall Project and Los Angeles Times: The Great California Prison Experiment

    The Great California Prison Experiment examines the impacts on public safety of the state’s criminal justice reform measures that dramatically reduced the prison population.
  • Baseball player promoted to varsity after sexually abusing child

    After receiving a tip, WJHL asked a juvenile court judge in Virginia to release court records related to a sex abuse case. They knew they had a shot securing the records after conferring with an open records expert. After all, the records involved serious felonies. The judge released the records after discussing the issue with the Virginia Supreme Court. The records confirmed exactly what we suspected. In the end, the investigation uncovered a legal and school system failure that allowed two baseball players to remain on the team and at school after sexually abusing their 11-year-old neighbor during an off-campus campout. The investigation prompted the court clerk to apologize and the school to take action against the boys.
  • Bias on the bench

    Florida legislators have struggled for 30 years to create an equitable justice system. But a Herald-Tribune investigation, involving an unprecedented analysis of tens of millions of electronic records, shows that black defendants are punished more severely than white defendants who commit the same crimes and have similar criminal backgrounds. Judges in Florida offer blacks fewer changes to avoid jail or scrub away felonies. They give blacks more time behind bars – sometimes double the sentences of whites. No news organization, university or government agency has ever done such a comprehensive investigation of sentences handed down by individual judges on a statewide scale. http://projects.heraldtribune.com/bias/
  • ChiMag: Crime Stats

    Written by National Magazine Award finalists David Bernstein and Noah Isackson, this ambitious two-part investigative series, which took the better part of a year to report, exposed how the Chicago Police Department underreported homicides and improperly downgraded scores more serious felonies to lesser offenses in order to bolster the department's crime statistics and make the city appear safer.
  • Broken Windows

    “Beyond Broken”: The number of summonses issued each year has soared since broken windows was implemented in the early 1990s — from 160,000 in 1993 to a peak of 648,638 in 2005 — making ticket writing for low-level offenses the single most frequent activity of NYPD officers, far surpassing felony and misdemeanor arrests combined. Roughly 81% of the 7.3 million people hit with summonses between 2001 and 2013 were black and Hispanic. And the top 15 precincts with the highest rate of summonses have a population that is 75% or more black and Hispanic. They spoke to nearly 170 people waiting in line at the city’s three summons courts. Although some admitted guilt, many said they felt targeted by officers looking to write tickets, as if their neighborhood were under “martial law.”
  • Fugitives from Justice

    Growing numbers of criminal suspects flee the U.S. each year to evade trial for murder, rape and other serious felonies. The investigation penetrated the government secrecy that shrouds America's interntaional fugitive extradition programs, giving a voice to forgotten victims.
  • The High Costs of Wrongful Convictions

    A seven-month investigation by the Better Government Association and the Center on Wrongful Convictions reveals the wrongful convictions of 85 men and women for violent crimes in Illinois has cost taxpayers more than $214 million, and imprisoned innocent people for more than 900 years. Meanwhile, the real perpetrators committed nearly 100 felonies.
  • Air Marshals: Undercover and Under Arrest

    The Federal Air Marshal Service presents the image of an elite undercover force charged with making life-and-death decisions that demand sound judgment. ProPublica found that dozens of air marshals have been charged with crimes, including 18 felonies, and hundreds more have been accused of misconduct. Cases include smuggling drugs past airport security, aiding a human trafficking ring, child sex abuse, bribery, drunken driving, domestic violence, holding an escort against her will during an overnight layover, solicitation to commit murder and voyeurism after one air marshal was caught taking photos of women's genitals on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial.
  • Policing the Air Marshals

    "The Federal Air Marshal Service presents the image of an elite undercover force charged with making life and death decisions that demand sound judgment. ProPublica found that dozens of federal air marshals have been charged with crimes, including 18 felonies, and hundreds more have been accused of misconduct."
  • Gangs in the Military

    Gang activity in the military is on the rise. This "coincides with the increase in military recruits with a criminal history. Since 2003, in order to meet recruitment goal, 125,000 recruits with criminal backgrounds have been granted waiver for felonies, including robbery and assault, so they can join up."