Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "finances" ...

  • In Donors We Trust

    This entry features the Detroit Free Press' innovative and exhaustive look into irregularities in the management of the University of Michigan’s $11 billion endowment. The years-long investigation detailed how executives at some of the nation's top investment firms donated hundreds of millions of dollars to the University of Michigan while the university in turn invested as much as $4 billion in those companies' funds. More than $400 million of that amount was sent into funds managed by three alumni who advise the university on the investments of its endowment. Critics who reviewed the newspaper’s computational and statistical analysis said Michigan’s approach of investing with some of its top donors, who also help guide the university's endowment, creates a conflict. After the publication of more than a dozen stories throughout 2018, the university reformed its conflict-of-interest rules; its president apologized for a lack in oversight; a member of its board of regents returned more than $20,000 in campaign contributions from an investment fund leader; and voters ousted both board incumbents running for re-election.
  • In Donors We Trust

    Everyone knows that college is more and more expensive to attend. So why are college and university endowments skyrocketing and now worth more than $567 billion? We started with the University of Michigan, lauded as one of the world’s best public universities which had stockpiled an endowment worth more than $11 billion. We found that university officials invested a good chunk of that endowment – one of the country’s largest among public institutions - in hundreds of private funds across the world. More importantly, our months-long investigation identified a select group who had secretly benefited: top university donors and alumni investment advisers who run private equity, hedge and venture capital funds and real estate investment firms. After our stories published throughout 2018, the university changed its investment policies; rerouted nearly $2 million into more student aid; made new investments based in the state; publicly released university executive compensation information after losing a FOIA lawsuit brought by the Free Press; and saw two university regents (i.e., trustees) lose their elections in November to those who promised more financial transparency and accountability based on our reporting.
  • Why is it ‘easy’ to steal from youth sports?

    Our investigation exposed how a prominent youth sports league that went to the Little League World Series was being ripped off by adult leaders. When we looked statewide, we found gaping loopholes in youth sport finances.
  • NYPD Inc.

    In the wake of a massive corruption scandal in the New York City Police Department, WNYC investigated the outside finances of top NYPD officials. The reporting found numerous top cops earn money on the side with little oversight. Some of these side jobs and investments appear to be conflicts of interest, setting a bad example for the rank and file, and helping create a culture where corruption can breed.
  • Blazer football, death and resurrection

    In late 2014 broke the story that UAB was going to become the first school in 20 years to end a Division 1 football program. Immediately our investigative reporting began, the first revelations coming just after the new 2015 year began. We dug into the financial ramifications, the decision makers behind it and the powerful movement to bring the team back. We discovered a powerful group of people did not want UAB football to exist, but our watchdog reporting fed the public the information they needed to keep fighting -- fans who wouldn't be stopped in its pursuit to return football to Birmingham, and claim black public accountability to their university.
  • Off Track

    An investigation into the finances of the $6.6 billion Honolulu rail project, the largest public construction project in the history of Hawaii. This ongoing series examines where the money is going, whether local companies and workers are getting the jobs and whether it is bolstering the state's economy.
  • Isis Inc

    The FT’s 'Isis Inc' series is the most difficult, important and revelatory investigation the Financial Times has done in years. It exposed for the first time how the jihadis raise - and spend - their money and run their affairs. It also underlined the failure of the western air campaign to dent its organization and revenues. The power of the reporting was reinforced by a host of telling graphics and interactives. “How oil fuels terrorists” was our most read story of the year.
  • Comrade Capitalism

    In these investigations, Reuters revealed how Putin’s daughter secretly married the son of an old friend of the president; how Putin’s new son-in-law went on to acquire a stake worth $2.85 billion in Russia’s biggest petrochemical processor; how that stake was financed by a cheap loan from a bank run by associates of Putin; and how the petrochemical company is now benefiting from $1.75 billion in cheap state finance. While much has been written about other Russian billionaires, no one has previously succeeded in shedding so much light on the finances of the president’s family. Former KGB officer Putin has long claimed to be a man of modest means, a frugal figure atop the former communist country now plundered by crony capitalism. http://www.reuters.com/investigates/section/comrade-capitalism-2015/
  • Private Risk

    In a year-long series, The Wall Street Journal exposed and analyzed the underbelly of Silicon Valley’s technology boom with powerful reporting that triggered action by federal regulators, the nation’s largest drugstore chain and major retailers. Among the many highlights was an expose of blood-testing firm Theranos Inc., detailing how the nation’s largest private health-care company hit technological snags—with employees filing complaints with regulatory agencies alleging the company concealed problems—as it performed millions of blood tests on patients. The articles selected here—from dozens of stories, infographics and videos in the Journal’s “Private Risk” series—also revealed how technology firms fudge their finances; how private tech shares are improperly traded in a shadowy market; and how millions of American own shares of private tech firms through their mutual funds with no idea about what they’re actually worth.
  • ACLU of Michigan: Flint Water Crisis

    This nomination is made by Kary Moss, Executive Director of the ACLU of Michigan, for work performed by the ACLU of Michigan’s Investigative Reporter, Curt Guyette. Curt’s work was pivotal in exposing the disastrous results of the State of Michigan’s decision to take the City of Flint off of the Detroit Water system and instead use the Flint River. At the time, the City was under the control of state-appointed emergency managers who had made the decision to switch the source of the City’s water as a cost-cutting measure. Two years ago the ACLU of Michigan created a new position of investigative report to examine and report on the repercussions of the State of Michigan’s use of a law that allowed it put an emergency manager in control of the city’s finances, divesting locally elected authorities of their powers. ACLU of Michigan legal staff provided additional help in filing Freedom of Information Act requests and helping Curt gain access to State of Michigan press briefings.