Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "grader" ...

  • The Grader Operator

    April 1st, 2017, a snowy Easter Saturday. That's the day Brenda Duhaime thinks it all started going wrong for her husband, Robert. Robert worked as a grader operator, clearing the roads in rural Saskatchewan. But that day, his grader got stuck in a ditch. And shortly after, Brenda says he started receiving angry phone calls from work. It took a toll on his mental health -- but when Robert applied for stress leave, his claim was denied. Four months later, Robert took his own life. And now his widow is trying to get answers.
  • #Being13: Inside the Secret World of Teens

    #Being13: Inside the Secret World of Teens" is a 2 year investigation & scientific study into what teens say on social media & the psychological effect these sites have on them. 100’s of 8th graders allowed child development experts to follow their social media posts over the course of 6 months. After studying 150,000 posts, all of the good, bad & ugly that kids experience online was revealed. We have results to questions the study sought to answer but also discovered so much about the secret language teens speak online & the huge disconnect between teens & parents regarding social media. https://vimeo.com/142305369 password: CNN
  • #Being13: Inside the Secret World of Teens

    #Being13: Inside the Secret World of Teens" is a 2 year investigation & scientific study into what teens say on social media & the psychological effect these sites have on them. 100’s of 8th graders allowed child development experts to follow their social media posts over the course of 6 months. After studying 150,000 posts, all of the good, bad & ugly that kids experience online was revealed. We have results to questions the study sought to answer but also discovered so much about the secret language teens speak online & the huge disconnect between teens & parents regarding social media.
  • Inside the Box

    Portable classrooms come cheap and fast. They offer a lifeline for districts with more students than building capacity, a problem recent projections show will worsen in coming years. But in Washington and Oregon, like at schools across the country, the temporary structures more often than not become permanent fixtures, InvestigateWest and EarthFix learned. The consequences can be serious, as for fourth-grader Shaylee Adams, who suffered high fevers, coughing and swelling.
  • Rialto Unified Holocaust essay assignment

    The 26,000-student Rialto Unified School District in Southern California asked its 2,000 eighth graders this spring to write an in-class essay assignment on whether or not the Holocaust occurred, and gave students print-outs from a Holocaust denial site as one of three "credible sources" they were required to base their work on. The district initially claimed that no students had denied the Holocaust occurred, but after the students' essays were obtained through a California Public Records Act request, it turned out that dozens of students had done so, some of them earning high marks along the way. The revelation led to international condemnation, the establishment of a new lesson plan for the rising ninth graders, the departure of high-ranking officials within the district and may have contributed to the school board president choosing to not run for reelection.
  • Stacked Up: Do Philly students have the books they need?

    Stacked Up employs data journalism to explore the hidden book crisis in Philadelphia schools. Most people would be surprised at the idea that a public school wouldn't have enough books. In Philadelphia, however, students and parents regularly complain of textbook shortages. A 10th grader at Parkway West High School told me that students often have to share books in class and can't take them home to do homework. Many books are in poor condition: "There were pictures of testicles drawn on every page," she said of one of her ninth-grade books. Access to books is particularly critical because a school today is labeled a success or failure based on students’ performance on high-stakes tests. The tests are highly specific and are aligned with state educational standards. The tests are also aligned with the textbooks sold by the 4 educational publishers that dominate the educational publishing market—the same publishers who have a hand in designing and grading the standardized tests. It therefore stands to reason that if students don’t have the right textbooks, they won’t be able to do well on the tests even if they want to.
  • Newtown School Massacre

    A gunman killed 20 first graders and six adults at Sandy Hook Elementary School. The Courant deployed its most seasoned and well-connected reporters after the tragic killing with a goal of providing accurate and detailed information in the hours and days after the incident.
  • Students concerned about low graders as final tests approach

    This computer-assisted reporting based investigation examined grade point average and test scores at Michigan State University. Morath analyzed data to determine the average grades for each class.
  • Special Cases

    This investigation shows how the Bakersfield City School District failed to make accomodations for a "violence-prone, emotionally disturbed eighth grader." The student ended up literally breaking his teacher's back, before school officials recognized that he was a danger to others.
  • Failing students getting promoted

    Despite the high numbers of students who failed statewide reading and math exams, Ohio area schools continue to pass them to higher grades, regardless of if they are ready. This series originally came about after one Cleveland teacher complained of having to promote fourth graders who she did not believe were ready for the fifth grade. Upon their own analysis, the Plain Dealer noticed that, though 99 percent of students were promoted in the last school year, 66 percent of them had failed state examinations. The investigation points out: "that gap was even more pronounced for black and Hispanic students who fail the tests more often than their white peers." The report also looks at the social and educational benefits to promoting or holding these students back.