Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "homeowners" ...

  • How Much are you Overpaying in Property Tax?

    In 2016, an apartment building in Athens County took out a loan for $48.3 million. Yet it was paying property tax as if it were valued at $13.8 million, a whopping $35 million difference. When the Cleveland Plain Dealer first reported on this in 2018, it got us thinking: there's a lot of great data out there that we could put together to see how much this actually costs our readers.
  • Kept Out

    Kept Out provided a sweeping indictment of access to credit, showing that millions of Americans are being denied a chance at the American dream simply because of the color of their skin. Because, homeownership is most families’ primary source of wealth, the average white family is now worth 15 times as much as the typical African American one.
  • CBS News: National Flood Insurance Mismanagement

    Our EXCLUSIVE six-month CBS News investigation uncovered serious fiscal mismanagement in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), administered by FEMA. Today, that program is 25 billion dollars in the red. We found that as storm victims struggle to rebuild, much of FEMA’s money that could pay homeowners claims actually goes to private insurance companies and legal fees to fight flood victims’ claims. Based on a review of thousands documents related to claims, lawsuits and FOIA requests, private government contractors are getting rich at the expense of desperate flood victims.
  • Kept Out

    Kept Out provided a sweeping indictment of access to credit, showing that millions of Americans are being denied a chance at the American dream simply because of the color of their skin. Because, homeownership is most families' primary source of wealth, the average white family is now worth 15 times as much as the typical African American one. Our radio documentary tells this story through one African-American woman's quest to buy a home in Philadelphia.
  • Information Roadblock

    This story outlines the push-back we received from city leaders when we tried to obtain emails that might explain why and how a city council member tried to closed off a public street at the request of a Homeowners Association in an affluent neighborhood without notifying, or getting any input from the residents in the adjoining subdivision. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NiZO3Ctg-0M&feature=youtu.be
  • Business of Disaster

    Superstorm Sandy devastated the East Coast in 2013, but it wasn’t a disaster for everyone. For some, Sandy was big money. This investigation revealed for the first time just how much money insurance companies make during a disaster, and how those companies wielded a taxpayer program into a powerhouse of profit while homeowners suffered.
  • Dangerous Exposure

    Toxic chemicals seeping from industrial sites across the State of Indiana are contaminating neighborhoods and putting families at risk of dangerous exposure. 13 Investigates discovered most Indiana homeowners are in the dark about toxins lurking below the ground or in the air. The companies responsible for the contamination promised to clean up their messes as part of a voluntary program offered by the State. In exchange, the state provides participating companies legal immunity from getting sued, but 13 Investigates discovered major breakdowns in accountability. Companies hiding out in the program for decades failed to clean up as promised. At the same time Indiana's top environmental watchdog agency failed to enforce the rules to keep homeowners safe. 13 Investigates Reporter Sandra Chapman uncovers what's hidden, presses for answers and finally gets government admissions that the State simply lost track of some sites and poorly managed others. In response the state created new directives to prevent stalled cleanups from exposing neighborhoods to toxic threats. http://youtu.be/cbACoNGvHMU http://www.wthr.com/tags/dangerous-exposures
  • How an internet mapping glitch turned a random Kansas farm into a digital hell

    This series found people who have been affected by mistakes in digital cartography, or the mapping of internet-connected devices via their IP addresses to the physical world. The story's major finding was that a widely-used Boston-based company called MaxMind that maps IP addresses had chosen default locations around the country for devices it could not map precisely. Some of those locations were on the property of homeowners. It resulted in millions of IP addresses being inaccurately mapped to these people's homes, and when the IP address was used to do something bad online, legal authorities and internet vigilantes assumed the people who lived at the homes were the culprits. https://gimletmedia.com/episode/53-in-the-desert/
  • IP Mapping

    This series found people who have been affected by mistakes in digital cartography, or the mapping of internet-connected devices via their IP addresses to the physical world. Our major finding was that a widely used Boston-based company called MaxMind that maps IP addresses had chosen default locations around the country for devices it could not map precisely. Some of those locations were on the property of homeowners. It resulted in millions of IP addresses being inaccurately mapped to these people's homes, and when the IP address was used to do something bad online, legal authorities and internet vigilantes assumed the people who lived at the homes were the culprits. https://gimletmedia.com/episode/53-in-the-desert/
  • A False Diamond: Reverse Mortgage Series Leads to Statewide Reform

    This series exposed the reverse mortgage/home repair scam Chicago businessman Mark Diamond had perpetrated for decades against elderly black homeowners on the city’s South and West Sides. The project also revealed the civil justice system’s toothlessness and raised pointed questions about how much havoc one person can wreak in the civil sphere before facing any criminal consequences. The project sparked a hearing by a state senator, media pickup, the filing and passage of state legislation and community action.