Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "immigrants" ...

  • Kids on the Line: An investigation into the contractors behind family separation

    As the U.S. government’s family separation policy played out in real time, Reveal’s investigation uncovered major problems with the contractors tasked with caring for immigrant children, including a defense company holding immigrant children in unlicensed facilities -- vacant office buildings in Phoenix without yards, showers or kitchens -- and a Texas shelter drugging immigrant children without their consent.
  • Breakdown: America's Immigration System

    Breakdown: America's Immigration System They flee the most dangerous places in North America, where murder rates are some of the highest in the world. Yet, when they come to the U.S., these immigrants encounter new hurdles created by an immigration system in total breakdown. NBC Bay Area’s Investigative Unit spent five years pulling back the curtain on system that is deeply flawed and completely overwhelmed. One judge likened it to life and death decisions being made with the same lack of resources as “traffic court.” As part of our commitment to covering this issue in a different way, NBC Bay Area sought to tell the story of immigrant policy in a way that most media do not.
  • Asylum Crackdown

    In her investigation “Chinatown Asylum Crackdown,” NPR’s Ailsa Chang shines a light on a never-before reported aspect of the Trump administration’s clampdown on the asylum system. Much of the news coverage on President Trump’s immigration policies has been focused on the White House’s efforts to turn away asylum-seekers at the border. What Chang reveals in her investigation for NPR’s Planet Money podcast is the Trump administration’s quiet operation to strip asylum status from immigrants who won it years ago. The people targeted in this sweeping review are Chinese immigrants – more than 13,000 of them. Many of them have been living in the U.S. for years with green cards and are now spending thousands of dollars defending their asylum cases in immigration court – years after winning asylum.
  • The Innocents: How U.S. Immigration Policy Punishes Migrant Children

    Federal immigration policies that separated children from their families at the U.S.-Mexico border had real, traumatic consequences on the most vulnerable members of our society. This series of exclusive investigations identified “tender age shelters” warehousing babies and toddlers, exposed a Virginia shelter where migrant teenagers described horrific abuse and followed a Salvadoran mother who came close to losing her daughter to adoption, revealing the legal possibility that separated children could be permanently taken from their parents. AP also followed the money, highlighting the billion-dollar business in migrant child detention, a sector that has grown tenfold in the last decade. Just before year’s end, AP broke the news that the government was keeping most of the 14,000 migrant kids in its care in shelters with hundreds of others, despite expert warnings that mass institutionalization can cause life-long trauma. Based on deep source reporting and exclusive data, the story was the first to provide the number of children in every government-contracted detention center, shelter and foster care program dating back to 2017 - data the government had been withholding all year.
  • The Intercept: Detained, then Violated

    The Intercept obtained hundreds of complaints of sexual and physical abuse in immigration detention, in response to a public records request with the Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Inspector General, which is tasked with independently reviewing the department’s various agencies, including ICE and Border Patrol.
  • Trapped in Gangland

    The Central American gang MS-13 accounts for 1 percent of U.S. gang murders. But when Donald Trump became president, he seized on the gang’s violence on Long Island to promote tougher immigration policies. This series, co-published with New York magazine, Newsday, The New York Times Magazine and This American Life, showed how Trump’s bungled crackdown on MS-13 burned informants, deported young immigrants suspected of gang involvement on flimsy evidence, and failed to prevent further murders. Based on a year and a half of difficult and dangerous reporting, ProPublica reporter Hannah Dreier’s stories persuasively depicted how an entire subculture of Latino teenagers came to be trapped between the gang and the government.
  • Dangerous Jobs, Cheap Meat

    Americans love meat – we have one of the highest rates of consumption in the world. While U.S. shoppers enjoy relatively low prices and an array of choices, there is a high human price tag. The more than 500,000 men and women who work in slaughterhouses and meat processing plants have some of the most dangerous factory jobs in America. The meatpacking industry has made a lot of progress on worker safety since publication of Upton Sinclair’s “The Jungle” in 1906, but some things remain the same: the work is mostly done by immigrants and refugees; they suffer high rates of injuries and even, sometimes death; and the government lags in oversight. http://harvestpublicmedia.org/content/dangerous-jobs-cheap-meat
  • American Coyotes

    American Coyotes is a series of stories about the human smugglers -- or "coyotes" -- who bring undocumented immigrants from Mexico into the United States via vehicle and on foot, often utilizing stash houses, in return for payments that vary depending on where the immigrant is coming from and where they are crossing the border. The stories look at how the coyotes operate, the impact they have on Americans who live along the border and the environment as well as the Border Patrol agents, law enforcement and even Texas National Guardsmen assigned to prevent undocumented immigrants.
  • The Changing Face of America

    Most data-driven discussions about race focus either on the national level (which masks local trends) or are centered on areas of conflict (such as Ferguson, Mo.) USA TODAY wanted to give people the tools that would allow them to explore how race end ethnicity have changed over time -- where they live and where they go to school. But how do you measure diversity when such trends wax and wane over time? Is a community that changed from nearly all-white to all-black as diverse as an area that received a high level of immigrants? Why do some communities barely notice big changes over time, while others become a nexus of violence? And how does the change in my community compare to anyone else's? To do that USA TODAY needed a tool to level the playing field, a way to show 100 years of change both locally and nationally, on the same scale. The series, based on the USA TODAY Diversity Index, is explanatory data at its best: quantifying incremental change that everyone sees anecdotally.
  • Telemundo 39 Diploma Mills

    Diploma mills have become prominent in North Texas. These businesses open shop as alleged private schools in small offices and offer home-school programs. They promised people a high school diploma in exchange of a flat fee. They take advantage of a loophole in Texas Law that protects home-school students from being discriminated by colleges or universities. People running these diploma mills are making thousands of dollars selling bogus diplomas, and the students are finding out the hard way. Some of them realize that the diplomas are useless when applying for work or for financial aid. After their broadcast, the group of students showcased in the first part received a money order with a refund for their diploma fee.